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Seashore

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About Seashore

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  • Birthday 12/03/1979

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  1. Seashore

    The Decline of the Travel Experience

    Colin, you missed out cruises. They’re on a race to the bottom in terms of standards whilst prices rocket, charging for room service, increasing gratuities (which is always a con anyway, especially Carnival who have just increased theirs from 15% to 18% of which only half the increase goes to the crew and the company pockets the rest - although P&O are getting rid of theirs since they have Iona to fill and New to Cruise Brits just don’t understand why they need to pay again for the service they were shown they were getting when buying the ticket). No longer 24 hour buffets and rarely any midnight buffet events. Toiletries replaced with cheap gunk in dispensers like a budget hotel. Balconies get narrower and narrower on new ships. Chocolates on the pillow went years ago, no time for towel animals even as a one off for formal night. Partly because most formal nights have been dropped. I’m lucky to be able to take a couple of cruises per year, I know others are not so, but the prices are increasing and the service is decreasing so it’s no longer the same good value it once was.
  2. Seashore

    Brexit effect on BF

    Still sooner than Grayling Ferries will be up and running! As long as Chris “Failing” to run ferries and trains didn’t tell you, then you know it could be true. Has his DfT found the Gatwick Drone yet? And to think he’s an architect of Project Leave. We’re all doomed!!
  3. Seashore

    New Look Revealed

    Yes, looks like they need to finish off the a and e’s 😂
  4. Seashore

    Brexit effect on BF

    I’d be disappointed having been extremely lucky to do 28 cruises, if Brittany Ferries think their ships and experience come anywhere close to the size, range of activities, quality of cabins, level of service, food options and the general chilled out experience... putting your hand in your pocket to get something to eat, tiny cabins and chucked out of said cabin at 05.15 GMT is nothing like a cruise. Totally agree with you there @jonno. Even against the likes of Color Magic and Fantasy, Viking Grace, Silja Symphony and Serenade, there’s no comparison.
  5. Seashore

    Government charter

    I might be missing something here, but someone might be able to say what I’m missing: If Dover is going to turn into a complete bottleneck (potentially) if no deal... A backlog in Calais could be mitigated by using the linkspans from Boulogne, Dunkerque, Ostend and Zeebrugge... ...then why can’t the existing capacity that is creating the bottleneck be diverted to another port? If there were already ship capacity issues then surely P&O and DFDS would have already put on more ships, traffic volumes aren’t likely to jump up because of Brexit. European Seaway used Ramsgate when it was on wind farm charter. Prides of Kent, Burgundy and Canterbury have identical hulls to European Seaway. Calais Seaways used to run from Ramsgate first as Prins Filip then as Ostend Spirit. Have I missed something there? I wouldn’t expect HM Government to work that out, they’ve made a meal of it already (pun intended!).
  6. Seashore

    Brexit effect on BF

    Faster? To fit in a Le Havre rotation at regular speed she’ll realistically need 16 hours (2x 5.5 hour crossings, 2x 2 hours turnarounds, anything more with deck 5 would be tight). Add in St Malo assuming she doesn’t slow steam, and you’ll need 22 hours (2x 9 hour crossings and 2x 2 hour turnarounds). So assuming that, she would need to do 37 hours work in a 24 hour period. I know her 1980’s vintage is another era but she’s not a time machine. Taking out the turnaround time, that’s 8 hours, leaves 16 hours. At the current speed she is at sea for 29 hours. Not allowing for the fact you have to slow down in port especially Portsmouth, she’ll need to sail at twice speed so 40-42 knots. Normandie Express doesn’t go that fast. Notwithstanding that getting a heavy steel ship with the hull proportions she has to go that fast, she’ll need an awful lot of power and burn a phenomenal amount of fuel; it’s not double, it’s more like six times the amount of fuel. Everyone will probably be sick on board from a corkscrewing effect, but they couldn’t fit scrubbers to her so a power plant six times the size and fuel tanks six times the size means there won’t be a lot of car deck left. It’s a reasonable question to wonder, but it’s totally impractical and uneconomical, hope you take it in the way it’s intended. If you’re considering Le Havre options without requiring additional tonnage, one possibility would be to take all the cars off Etretat, Baie de Seine and Normandie to make way for freight and put the cars on Normandie Express doing an extra Le Havre rotation. That would mathematically gain enough lane metres to make up the difference, assuming 250 cars on a conventional ship, plus with fewer passengers you need fewer crew on the larger ships.
  7. Seashore

    New Look Revealed

    Surely won’t it be one single, continuous stripe?
  8. Seashore

    Brexit effect on BF

    Most travelling public would prefer a new, clean, open plan ship than a dated, dirty (cabins in particular) and dingey ship.
  9. Seashore

    Normandie not sailing as economie

    I think she will feel spacious - most particularly in the car decks! Mont St Michel is marginally larger than Val de Loire, but again far fewer cabins, no swimming pool, no observation lounge etc. Her car decks are cavenous though and that’s where all the space went; grt measures enclosed space so that includes car decks. If you look at the ex Olau pair to Le Havre, they’re now with GNV (brand merged with SNAV, both are owned by MSC), they took the cabins out along the car decks and resulted in a huge increase in freight and car capacity, partly due to the lane meterage but also because air doesn’t weigh a lot whilst cabin units and the associated services are heavy. Trucks weigh a lot but they replace the cabins and likely earn a lot more per square metre and have the advantage that the company doesn’t need to clean them (although it seems they don’t bother cleaning them on Bretagne either 😂). I think the other indication is that MSM has a certificate for 2,200 passengers whilst Honfleur is being built for 1,600. Honfleur will basically be a big truck and car carrier. (But not as big as that new Irish Ferries Holyhead ship, at 67,000 and with at least 3 double height vehicle decks plus an outdoor lorry deck at the the stern, that thing is massive.)
  10. Seashore

    Normandie not sailing as economie

    Nice photos @LHCity, merci beaucoup ! There is about a 20% difference in size, Normandie is listed as 27,542 grt whilst the “Olau” twins are 33,336. Deceptive because they are about the same length but the Prides were taller and bulkier, less tapered at the top. Of course, Val de Loire was a similar size to the Prides and in Portsmouth side by side there was a noticeable difference. The extra internal space generally went into cabins - Normandie has about 760 berths whilst VdL/Prides were about 1600.
  11. Seashore

    Government charter

    I think there’s a limit to the berths that the Spirits can use, so berth utilisation has to be planned around them coming in. Berth 1 is single deck, would work for a freighter. Then there’s two pairs, Berths 2 & 3 and Berths 5 & 6 (berth 4 had a small linkspan removed decades ago, last used by the Ostend tubs), then Berth 7 sandwiched between Berths 8 & 9. Even in the pre tunnel days with ships to Boulogne, Calais, Dunkerque, Zeebrugge and Ostend it has never had so many. But I think the issue isn’t about linkspans or even the capacity of the ships. It’s vast amount of traffic and the corresponding size of the ships that means that any delay getting trucks through customs is going to have an immediate and significant impact. A small initial delay could snowball fast. What this won’t be doing is encouraging folks to go on self drive anywhere on the continent at least for the foreseeable; it’ll hit the likes of Eurocamp, Canvas etc hard plus probably Brittany Ferries’ holidays too as the majority public perception will be all the ferries will be backed up. HM Government couldn’t make more of a mess of Brexit if they tried, thanks Theresa Omnishambles May.
  12. Seashore

    New Look Revealed

    @Paully is right. Most millennials in the demographic sense are “time poor” so spending hours on a ferry is not a priority. @Gareth I can’t believe you missed out the social media phrase of the moment; gutted. I have images of people in total devastation like the world has ended because the tiniest thing has not gone their way. Or that they’re sitting there with no innards left, like a fish is gutted. It’s the tendency on social media to be keyboard warriors and exaggerate everything.
  13. Seashore

    New Look Revealed

    The one thing that seems strange to me, is that modern branding rarely makes use of italics these days. It’s all about clarity and quality on websites, especially when viewed on mobile phones. The BBC dropped italics years ago citing just that. Looking at the font Jim has used on the forum header in regular font, it’s much more modern looking.
  14. Seashore

    New Look Revealed

    30 year old banger with tiny dated cabins and bathrooms with smaller windows than an aeroplane some under the car deck (fortunately without windows) and not enough for half the passengers on a busy Friday night sailing, noisy engines, threadbare carpets, 1980s decor, terrible free WiFi and almost nothing to do for 9 hours in the day except pay more to eat or pay to watch a film. The latter Stena give you for free. Ask most of the travelling public and they’ll say they’re already getting a budget product at premium prices.
  15. Seashore

    New Look Revealed

    Why do they need to be set apart? They have no direct competitors on the Western Channel. And why do they have to pay attention to detail, as manifest in the quality of cabin preparation. They should but right now they don’t always do it. Setting apart isn’t always a line’s priority - look at Dover with very little to separate the P&O and DFDS liveries.
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