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Timmy

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About Timmy

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  • Birthday 07/02/1981

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  1. From my brochure collection the schedules were:- 1995 Dep Portsmouth 0800, 1445 and 2230 Dep Le Havre 0830, 1630 and 2300 1996 Dep Portsmouth 0800, 1445 and 2230 Dep Le Havre 0830, 1600 and 2300 2003 Dep Portsmouth 0730, 1500 and 2230 Dep Le Havre 0830, 1550 and 2330 2005 Dep Portsmouth 0830, 1530 and 2230 Dep Le Havre 0930, 1630 and 2330
  2. P&O is still very much run as separate companies within a company. While it's all managed from one HQ crewing and fleet management etc are still split Dover, North Sea and Irish Sea with different crew T's & C's which means they are not easily interchangeable. There are also more recently created divisions which mix and match from the historic ones. I suspect we shall see Pride of Bruges and one Dover ship return sooner rather than later more for freight demand than passenger.
  3. Both the Bruges and York are technically fine and could be made ready for service in a week or so. However the British side of P&O is coming to the end of the redundancy process so there is unlikely to be enough British Officers and Ratings to have the York and more than one of the laid up Dover ships return to service soon.
  4. Rotterdam service is pretty much full of freight most sailings leaving only Deck 7 for pax at the moment.
  5. Twin screw inward turning CPP ferry with Bow Thrusters and Quay on starboard side. Rudders hard to starboard, port CPP ahead, stbd CPP astern to arrest any headway as if you pick up too much speed your pivot point moves fwd and you'll make life difficult for yourself, Bow thruster thrusting to push the bow to port and voila you're moving sideways. Slow and steady always wins the race with manoeuvring.
  6. The pictures showing the changes to Le Havre over the years are fascinating, thanks to LHCity and hhvferry for posting them. I never noticed the difference between the jumbo Viking Valiant and Viking Venturer, they have different colour TT's on the upper bow door. Townsend Thoresen often did things like that to distinguish sister ships, the Spirit class all had differences allegedly so they could tell the difference from Channel House. Where was the Normandy Ferries terminal in Le Havre in relation to the rest of the city? I've read it was in quite an inconvenient location in comparison to the Thoresen terminal
  7. Interesting note at the end of that article about Stena Nordica:- The third vessel on that route is currently the Stena Baltica aka Cotentin, does that mean the Baltica is being returned to BF or moving to another Stena route?
  8. The Bilbao is coming off Berth 2, the Le Havre is pulling up next to the Bilbao to crab on to the berth once it's clear. I assume she has done that so she doesn't get held up by the Bretagne swinging. Only the Super Vikings used Berth 3 until it was rebuilt for the 'new' Pride of Cherbourg.
  9. Norsky and Elisabeth on Hull-Zeebrugge
  10. The Raptor Class have a Voith Schneider unit at each end along the centre line of the vessel. Both are normally used for propulsion but the aft one in direction of travel is also used for steering like a rudder. I image if there was a problem with one of the units the Master would favour steering with the stronger unit so the vessel would need to turned after departure for one leg of the round trip.
  11. Spirit of France is in the larger Amsterdam dry dock, maybe they can only handle one large ship at a time?
  12. Stena Superfast X is currently on the Rosslare-Cherbourg run so you've got something different albeit temporarily.
  13. She's going to the same yard as the Bruges.
  14. No, they are found on older vessels as a SOLAS stability modification. They divide up the main vehicle deck in to smaller areas to reduce free surface effect if there is water on deck. Pride of Bruges/York and Princess Seaways have a variation of them. King Seaways has internal sponsons instead to comply with the rules.
  15. You mean Bilge Water? Ballast water isn't normally tested and doesn't need to go through an OWS as it's just ballast and shouldn't have gone near anything oily. Hence why the Ballast Water Convention is more interested in invasive species than oil pollution. There have been instances where ballast tanks have become contaminated with fuel oil because the ballast and heated fuel tanks are right next to each other and hot fuel on one side of the bulkhead and cold ballast water on the other doesn't do wonders to said bulkhead over time. But that's a design and inspection issue.
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