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Bad weather and sea-sickness advice

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My wife and I have been traveling regularly between UK and Santander on Pont Avon in summer. She tends to suffer from sea sickness, but on only one occasion was the sea rough enough to seriously trouble her. This year, we are planning to travel in the mid-November to mid-December period, but are worried about heavy seas in the Bay of Biscay. Does anyone have any experience of traveling at this time of year?

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Not done that route and never suffered with seasickness. However, our daughter does, but since a work colleague of mine recommended STUGERON for her she has crossed in the roughest of seas on most of BF's routes. Don't, like a lot of folk, take them as you get on board or start to feel ill. Take them 2 hours before the crossing starts and then every 8 hours.

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I did the Pont Aven to Santander in November last year, must have been lucky as the Bay of Biscay was like a millpond most of the way; there was the odd bit of bumpy water, but I found that while the Pont pitches a fair bit, there was very little roll. Luck of the draw regarding the weather I guess.

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Yeah, its really down to pot luck.

 

Some winter crossings on the Biscay can be just like a crossing in the summer.

 

Others can be a lot rougher. But the position of your cabin can really help. If on the PA, I would go for a mid-ship cabin on deck 8 or 7.

 

If the weather is bad, deck 5 and 6 cabins on the Pont near the bow can suffer from an awful lot of metallic banging noises as she plys through the water. Not a nice sound to lull you to sleep.

 

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Should that be decks 5 and 6? There are no cabins on deck 7 and on deck 8 are either forward or towards the stern.

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You could get bad weather any time of the year... We had poor weather in May..... So impossible to call.

If she feels dreadful, then why not save her the trouble and put her on a flight? Low season flights can be very cheap.... Even BA have single flights to Bilbao for less than £70 (or 4,000 avios(airmiles) and £17.50) if you collect them... One of our family regularly does this!

Again, cabin location as mentioned is important, an inside cabin on deck 8 opposite the deluxe cabins are well located.... Stay away from the bow!

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Strangely Ginger biscuits work well ??????

i

Ginger is a very old remedy for motion sickness and nausea, dating from ancient Chinese medicine through to the present. You can drink ginger tea - thinly sliced ginger root infused in boiling water with anything you like to add to it. But if you get biscuits, get the best quality: plenty of ginger.

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We have done this crossing many times at various times of the year. Certainly winter months can be rough - as has been said a cabin in the middle of the ship is more comfortable but if you are not a good sailor then take a supply of "Sea Legs" tablets to make the crossing more comfortable. You cannot buy sea sickness tablets on the ship..

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One of the best things is to get outside, fresh air and look at the horizon, of course in bad weather they don't let you outside!

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Thanks for the advice. Several people have told me about the best cabins to minimize seasickness. But I book online and are just given a cabin number, there is no opportunity to make a choice?

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Thanks for the advice. Several people have told me about the best cabins to minimize seasickness. But I book online and are just given a cabin number, there is no opportunity to make a choice?

 

Hi there,

 

Earlier this year when it looked like we were in for a rough crossing, I posted on here with our cabin number to ask if anyone could tell me where on the ship it was located. I got a number of helpful replies which established that our cabin was at the forward end of the ship. I then phoned BF customer services and asked for a different cabin which, based on the advice received on here, might provide a more comfortable experience. BF were happy to oblige and although technically they could have charged an amendment fee, they were happy to waive this. We actually got a cabin right at the aft end and in pretty lively seas it proved to be very comfortable.

 

Andy

 

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We have found that being still for a long time before sailing helps we used to travel down and get on the ferry now we travel down have a night in Plymouth/Roscoff and the sail , a lot of yoga poses to balance your body helps.

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My Grandad was a sea captain and swore if you had a double brandy you would never be seasick and do you know - its true. Try it, 

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Hi Lalli,

That sounds like great advice; if one of those nice people in the marketing department at BF HQ are reading this then I'm sure the Courvoisier Brandy will be on Special Offer as soon as the weather starts going downhill......:o

Your Grandad was lucky enough to live in lax times; in today's more safety conscious world ( for better or for better) as far as I'm aware all ferry companies operate a dry ship policy, especially in European waters. From the Captain down, if they are caught under the influence then like airline pilots their job/career is at stake.

 

Chris

 

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The best prevention and cure for mal de mer is to lie down in the shade of a stone cottage.

Joking aside, we're all different but we find Stugeron to be the best drug, and lying down in your cabin a very good alternative. 

We had spectacular storms in the Bay of Biscay last November, a time of year when I think it's even more likely for there to be bad weather. We survived, it was like being on a fairground ride, and a little boring as we just lay on our bed sedated by stugeron for some hours. We were surprised the ship even sailed, as we found it the roughest crossing ever, in many years of Spanish and French crossings.

I think it's more likely to encounter rough seas in the winter.

We sailed to Caen last Friday night, were in bed 30 mins before we set off. It was so calm, when I woke up at 03.30 I had to look out the window as I couldn't believe we'd actually left Portsmouth!

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We do the trip to Northern Spain and back in both summer and winter. As has been said you can have a calm crossing and a rough crossing at any time so pot luck really if you are booking well in advance. I guess we are fortunate not to suffer with sea sickness probably due to many experiences crossing the Irish sea on a much smaller vessel.  We used to give our children "Sea Legs" tablets which worked well but did make them drowsy for a few hours.

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