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New cowes floating bridge


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Yachts have been regularly crashing into the floating bridge for many years. Often because they were not anticipating it popping out in front of them and the tide carrying them onto it. Yachts don't have brakes.

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Quite surprised you got to the end of your post without it being suspended again ūüėĄ

Spotted laid up by the Gosport Ferry Terminal today    (Apologies for poor image quality )

Not too old at all, On BFE we are all juvenile trainspotter types. That's what the site is all about.

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I know, but in the photo it looks like his sails were down and he was using his engine to manoeuvre. I guess a yacht is simply less responsive to the helm and throttle than a RIB or motorboat would be when you need to take evasive action. Ed.  

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Yes, yacht engines are not very responsive in reverse, if it can only push the boat along at around 5 knots or so normally (and that can take a while to achieve) then the 4 knots of tide that can sometimes be experienced in the vicinity of the chain ferry don't give you many options. it will take a while to stop if you try to reverse and if you put the helm over then the chances are you will be carried sideways onto the obstacle. Looks like he might have been trying to do the latter and ran out of room. Easily done I'm afraid, I have seen it happen. Usually the result is just damaged paintwork and scratches and an embarrassed skipper.

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Yes that was my interpretation of the photo too and he perhaps turned to hard, lost forward momentum and was unable to recover in time to skip around the bow/stern of the ferry. Plus the tide and wind may have contributed to the loss of control. Ed 

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True, although it does have only two fixed headings which most regular harbour users should be aware of. As to whether the yacht crashed into its bow or stern, does anyone know what the rules is for double-ended ferries? Does the bow change ends depending on the direction of travel or are the two extremities fixed and defined in relation to the bridge/superstructure? Ed. 

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It's basically up to yacht skippers top read their charts and be aware of potential navigational hazards. Inevitably however Cowes has huge numbers of visiting yachts, many of which will be unfamiliar with the characteristics of floating bridges. Occasionally one gets caught out.

Compared with most leisure boat areas, the Solent is incredibly busy with a mix of leisure and commercial craft and has been likened to an area of multiple motorways. When out on the water you need your wits about you at all times as hazardous situations can appear out of nowhere.

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1 hour ago, Cabin-boy said:

True, although it does have only two fixed headings which most regular harbour users should be aware of. As to whether the yacht crashed into its bow or stern, does anyone know what the rules is for double-ended ferries? Does the bow change ends depending on the direction of travel or are the two extremities fixed and defined in relation to the bridge/superstructure? Ed. 

One fixed end will be the bow, and the other stern, regardless of direction of travel (ie one direction it will be going "in reverse")

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On 1/4/2017 at 15:11, CyberMatt said:

Some videos here of the last day, plus how they 'unchain' it and tow it away...

Seems that by encouraging the master to bring the vessel further up the ramp, the chance of a grounding (on a falling tide) is increased.

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It's to do with the chains not having enough tension to hold her straight when the tide is spring and she misses the slipway .if they tension them more river traffic will snag them .cant think of a solution so who knows what will happen 

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2 hours ago, eagleeye said:

It's to do with the chains not having enough tension to hold her straight when the tide is spring and she misses the slipway .if they tension them more river traffic will snag them .cant think of a solution so who knows what will happen 

Sounds like this is something fundamental that should have been thought of right at the start of the planning process and long before they went to construction. If so I hope the designers have good liability cover. They may well be needing it

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23 hours ago, eagleeye said:

It's to do with the chains not having enough tension to hold her straight when the tide is spring and she misses the slipway .if they tension them more river traffic will snag them .cant think of a solution so who knows what will happen 

Could that be connected to the repositioning of the chain pits which you referred to a couple of pages back and led to the delay in starting the service?  Ed. 

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I'm sure with the old bridge they had some additional chains that could be attached between the edge of the slipway and the upstream chain as the tide went down to prevent the ferry being dragged "out to sea".  Haven't seen any evidence of these in any of the photos of the new ferry.

Anyway, problem now solved by not running the ferry when it's low tide!

Pete.

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4 hours ago, Cabin-boy said:

Could that be connected to the repositioning of the chain pits which you referred to a couple of pages back and led to the delay in starting the service?  Ed. 

There is speculation that the chains are thinner and lighter and the bridge heavier so they are struggling 

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