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Which financial companies are leaving London, or are we still looking at pre referendum threats and post referendum hysteria? As for the pound, it'll stabilize at around 1.22 (currently at 1.20) against the euro and 1.35 (1.32) against the dollar... Ideal for trade making the UK most attractive especially to our biggest single export market, the US.

 

Let's remember that it's less than 2 years since sterling was worth 1.20 and I can't remember anyone saying it was in a state then.

 

Standard life stopping trading in their property portfolio because of the mass exodus of money from it to name just one of the companies doing similar, the loosing of the country's top credit rating but it's all scaremongering apparently, let's see how the pound holds up after the novelty of a new PM being appointed has worn of , hopefully the country won't loose too much in tax by cutting corporation tax so much.

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Which financial companies are leaving London, or are we still looking at pre referendum threats and post referendum hysteria? As for the pound, it'll stabilize at around 1.22 (currently at 1.20) against the euro and 1.35 (1.32) against the dollar... Ideal for trade making the UK most attractive especially to our biggest single export market, the US.

 

Let's remember that it's less than 2 years since sterling was worth 1.20 and I can't remember anyone saying it was in a state then.

 

Standard life stopping trading in their property portfolio because of the mass exodus of money from it to name just one of the companies doing similar, the loosing of the country's top credit rating but it's all scaremongering apparently, let's see how the pound holds up after the novelty of a new PM being appointed has worn of , hopefully the country won't loose too much in tax by cutting corporation tax so much.

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Good to see that Siemens will continue to invest in the UK, though.

 

Well perhaps the Siemens CEO might be slightly less keen to invest when he finds out Poole council want to turn his traffic light factory into a housing estate. It's always a good idea to create more housing while at the same time trying to eliminate some of the better paid more skilled jobs in the area.

 

 

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Good to see that Siemens will continue to invest in the UK, though.

 

Well perhaps the Siemens CEO might be slightly less keen to invest when he finds out Poole council want to turn his traffic light factory into a housing estate. It's always a good idea to create more housing while at the same time trying to eliminate some of the better paid more skilled jobs in the area.

 

 

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Standard life stopping trading in their property portfolio because of the mass exodus of money from it to name just one of the companies doing similar, the loosing of the country's top credit rating but it's all scaremongering apparently, let's see how the pound holds up after the novelty of a new PM being appointed has worn of , hopefully the country won't loose too much in tax by cutting corporation tax so much.

 

 

Ok, Standard Life, M&G & Aviva, halted property investment withdrawals. The property investment market had ballooned by over 40% since '09 and Smith Williamson advised me in January that the bubble had burst. Open ended property funds have been seeing large outflows since February, the closed ended funds have performed far more robustly. But yes, Brexit hasn't helped the smaller investor who by design panic a lot faster and look to diversify. It's interesting that less than 24 hours later when the three UK based firms began trading again it didn't make the news. Let's not forget that Standard Life threatened to pull out of Scotland if there had been a positive independence vote too.

 

None of these have threatened to leave the UK though.

 

triple A ratings are a bit disingenuous. Any rating above BBB- is classed as solid investment grade with only BB+ and lower classed as junk or speculative.

 

Abu Dhabi has over 1 trillion of worldwide investment and has one of the highest GDP per capita, 9% of the world's proven oil reserves and 5% of the world's gas however this only accounts for approximately 50% of their income, they aren't fossil fuel dependant plus their income from none fossil fuels will rise closer to 70% by 2030.

 

It's credit rating is only AA. The same as the UK.

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Standard life stopping trading in their property portfolio because of the mass exodus of money from it to name just one of the companies doing similar, the loosing of the country's top credit rating but it's all scaremongering apparently, let's see how the pound holds up after the novelty of a new PM being appointed has worn of , hopefully the country won't loose too much in tax by cutting corporation tax so much.

 

 

Ok, Standard Life, M&G & Aviva, halted property investment withdrawals. The property investment market had ballooned by over 40% since '09 and Smith Williamson advised me in January that the bubble had burst. Open ended property funds have been seeing large outflows since February, the closed ended funds have performed far more robustly. But yes, Brexit hasn't helped the smaller investor who by design panic a lot faster and look to diversify. It's interesting that less than 24 hours later when the three UK based firms began trading again it didn't make the news. Let's not forget that Standard Life threatened to pull out of Scotland if there had been a positive independence vote too.

 

None of these have threatened to leave the UK though.

 

triple A ratings are a bit disingenuous. Any rating above BBB- is classed as solid investment grade with only BB+ and lower classed as junk or speculative.

 

Abu Dhabi has over 1 trillion of worldwide investment and has one of the highest GDP per capita, 9% of the world's proven oil reserves and 5% of the world's gas however this only accounts for approximately 50% of their income, they aren't fossil fuel dependant plus their income from none fossil fuels will rise closer to 70% by 2030.

 

It's credit rating is only AA. The same as the UK.

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Ok, Standard Life, M&G & Aviva, halted property investment withdrawals. The property investment market had ballooned by over 40% since '09 and Smith Williamson advised me in January that the bubble had burst. Open ended property funds have been seeing large outflows since February, the closed ended funds have performed far more robustly. But yes, Brexit hasn't helped the smaller investor who by design panic a lot faster and look to diversify. It's interesting that less than 24 hours later when the three UK based firms began trading again it didn't make the news. Let's not forget that Standard Life threatened to pull out of Scotland if there had been a positive independence vote too.

 

None of these have threatened to leave the UK though.

 

triple A ratings are a bit disingenuous. Any rating above BBB- is classed as solid investment grade with only BB+ and lower classed as junk or speculative.

 

Abu Dhabi has over 1 trillion of worldwide investment and has one of the highest GDP per capita, 9% of the world's proven oil reserves and 5% of the world's gas however this only accounts for approximately 50% of their income, they aren't fossil fuel dependant plus their income from none fossil fuels will rise closer to 70% by 2030.

 

It's credit rating is only AA. The same as the UK.

 

Obviously you think you've made the right decision regarding brexit, others will profoundly disagree with you. I'm afraid one swallow doesn't make a summer. There may be pointers or some anecdotal evidence that will point to the final outcome for the country but they may all turnout to be false trails. Everything you or I might say at the present time is, frankly, irrelevant. At present however, nothing regarding brexit is set in stone, nothing has changed, nothing that happens today or tomorrow is necessarily likely to last. Until things settle down in perhaps five or more probably ten years time no one will know if brexit is the greatest thing since sliced bread or the biggest self inflicted disaster to befall any country in recent history.

 

 

Ok, Standard Life, M&G & Aviva, halted property investment withdrawals.

 

Aberdeen Asset Management had also halted property investment withdrawals. The good news is they have now said they will allow withdrawals. The bad news is you have to accept a 17% cut in the value of your investment to protect future of the fund.

Edited by G4rth

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Ok, Standard Life, M&G & Aviva, halted property investment withdrawals. The property investment market had ballooned by over 40% since '09 and Smith Williamson advised me in January that the bubble had burst. Open ended property funds have been seeing large outflows since February, the closed ended funds have performed far more robustly. But yes, Brexit hasn't helped the smaller investor who by design panic a lot faster and look to diversify. It's interesting that less than 24 hours later when the three UK based firms began trading again it didn't make the news. Let's not forget that Standard Life threatened to pull out of Scotland if there had been a positive independence vote too.

 

None of these have threatened to leave the UK though.

 

triple A ratings are a bit disingenuous. Any rating above BBB- is classed as solid investment grade with only BB+ and lower classed as junk or speculative.

 

Abu Dhabi has over 1 trillion of worldwide investment and has one of the highest GDP per capita, 9% of the world's proven oil reserves and 5% of the world's gas however this only accounts for approximately 50% of their income, they aren't fossil fuel dependant plus their income from none fossil fuels will rise closer to 70% by 2030.

 

It's credit rating is only AA. The same as the UK.

 

Obviously you think you've made the right decision regarding brexit, others will profoundly disagree with you. I'm afraid one swallow doesn't make a summer. There may be pointers or some anecdotal evidence that will point to the final outcome for the country but they may all turnout to be false trails. Everything you or I might say at the present time is, frankly, irrelevant. At present however, nothing regarding brexit is set in stone, nothing has changed, nothing that happens today or tomorrow is necessarily likely to last. Until things settle down in perhaps five or more probably ten years time no one will know if brexit is the greatest thing since sliced bread or the biggest self inflicted disaster to befall any country in recent history.

 

 

Ok, Standard Life, M&G & Aviva, halted property investment withdrawals.

 

Aberdeen Asset Management had also halted property investment withdrawals. The good news is they have now said they will allow withdrawals. The bad news is you have to accept a 17% cut in the value of your investment to protect future of the fund.

Edited by G4rth

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For our limited quota allowances on trade I look at it this way...

 

Diamonds are possibly the most common stone on the earth, their high price is maintained by limited distribution and stockpiling. Oil was the same until the non OPEC countries decided to sell commensurate to extraction, hence the drop in price, hey the Yanks & OPEC may scream & shout but shipping like it and I'm still paying £107.9.

 

Our EU trade allowances are also similarly limited... As an example...

 

You may be able to manufacture 200000 toilet rolls for an export market who want them but the European Parliament (not the Commission) says that you can only export 50000... This in turn pushes up manufacturing & labour costs forcing you to sell at a higher price and subsequently let staff go as they're not needed.

 

You remove the limits and you're back to capacity, employing staff, selling cheaper and due to the price and a non inflated pound you may actually need to expand.

 

If Switzerland want your 200000 loo rolls they should be allowed to buy them without having the burden of added expense from searching for another manufacturer.

 

The UK is forced to import an inferior product because it's already taken its allowance of the class A product. This kills competitive aspiration as the inferior manufacturer knows he'll sell regardless. Why strive to do better when you don't have to?

 

Why is it that the likes of BAE, other UK defence, aerospace and specialised automotive manufacturers are thriving? It's because they aren't governed by the same legislation. They sell to individual countries whether they are in the EU or not.

 

I think all manufacturers across Europe should get the same deal.

 

This isn't just us, it's every European nation. As for free trade, it's not. it costs us £175bn a year for a door key. £175bn which in turn goes into the pot used to bail out less fortunate countries who are struggling due to their limited manufacturing & export quotas causing unemployment and slow economies because no one can spend what they can't earn...

 

Spain's economic growth this year will be -1.7% coupled with 25% unemployment.

 

Since 2008, nine member states have had bailouts worth over £540bn, that will rise to over £600bn later this year due to Italy's struggling economy.

 

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For our limited quota allowances on trade I look at it this way...

 

Diamonds are possibly the most common stone on the earth, their high price is maintained by limited distribution and stockpiling. Oil was the same until the non OPEC countries decided to sell commensurate to extraction, hence the drop in price, hey the Yanks & OPEC may scream & shout but shipping like it and I'm still paying £107.9.

 

Our EU trade allowances are also similarly limited... As an example...

 

You may be able to manufacture 200000 toilet rolls for an export market who want them but the European Parliament (not the Commission) says that you can only export 50000... This in turn pushes up manufacturing & labour costs forcing you to sell at a higher price and subsequently let staff go as they're not needed.

 

You remove the limits and you're back to capacity, employing staff, selling cheaper and due to the price and a non inflated pound you may actually need to expand.

 

If Switzerland want your 200000 loo rolls they should be allowed to buy them without having the burden of added expense from searching for another manufacturer.

 

The UK is forced to import an inferior product because it's already taken its allowance of the class A product. This kills competitive aspiration as the inferior manufacturer knows he'll sell regardless. Why strive to do better when you don't have to?

 

Why is it that the likes of BAE, other UK defence, aerospace and specialised automotive manufacturers are thriving? It's because they aren't governed by the same legislation. They sell to individual countries whether they are in the EU or not.

 

I think all manufacturers across Europe should get the same deal.

 

This isn't just us, it's every European nation. As for free trade, it's not. it costs us £175bn a year for a door key. £175bn which in turn goes into the pot used to bail out less fortunate countries who are struggling due to their limited manufacturing & export quotas causing unemployment and slow economies because no one can spend what they can't earn...

 

Spain's economic growth this year will be -1.7% coupled with 25% unemployment.

 

Since 2008, nine member states have had bailouts worth over £540bn, that will rise to over £600bn later this year due to Italy's struggling economy.

 

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Actually Jonno your detailed analysis will fly over the heads of many... but it is a so clear and defined analysis linked to good old common sense and trade statistics and as you have pointed out the EU bailouts have now reached mega values. I have always appreciated that having a small well run company with dedicated employees works extremely well - "expansion" does create its own problems and again I personally think the Common Market/EEC/EU now has the repercussions of this with 27 countries most of which require major support.

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Actually Jonno your detailed analysis will fly over the heads of many... but it is a so clear and defined analysis linked to good old common sense and trade statistics and as you have pointed out the EU bailouts have now reached mega values. I have always appreciated that having a small well run company with dedicated employees works extremely well - "expansion" does create its own problems and again I personally think the Common Market/EEC/EU now has the repercussions of this with 27 countries most of which require major support.

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Suffice to say the UK has not contributed a cent of so-called EU bailout funds since the early funding at a low level in 2010/11, all of which proved a very good move and was subsequently recovered as our trading partners (Ireland and Portugal in those cases) weathered the storm. And the UK is exempt from making any further contributions to bailout funds in the eurozone going forward.

 

If you could substantiate the £175bn figure and the thing about toilet roll quotas that would be fab.

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Suffice to say the UK has not contributed a cent of so-called EU bailout funds since the early funding at a low level in 2010/11, all of which proved a very good move and was subsequently recovered as our trading partners (Ireland and Portugal in those cases) weathered the storm. And the UK is exempt from making any further contributions to bailout funds in the eurozone going forward.

 

If you could substantiate the £175bn figure and the thing about toilet roll quotas that would be fab.

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I believe the European parliament have stopped using toilet roll now and have moved over to vellum due to the more satisfying sensations it produces. Apparently it feels just like Nigel Farage's skin. They have however just found an Australian company which promises to go one better: http://www.toiletpaper.com.au/24-car...-paper-1-roll/

Ed.

Edited by Cabin-boy

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I believe the European parliament have stopped using toilet roll now and have moved over to vellum due to the more satisfying sensations it produces. Apparently it feels just like Nigel Farage's skin. They have however just found an Australian company which promises to go one better: http://www.toiletpaper.com.au/24-car...-paper-1-roll/

Ed.

Edited by Cabin-boy

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I believe the European parliament have stopped using toilet roll now and have moved over to vellum due to the more satisfying sensations it produces. Apparently it feels just like Nigel Farage's skin. They have however just found an Australian company which promises to go one better: http://www.toiletpaper.com.au/24-car...-paper-1-roll/

Ed.

 

Slam Dunk......Jonno don't even respond.... I remeber IZAL.... LOL....:o

Edited by Manxscorpio

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I believe the European parliament have stopped using toilet roll now and have moved over to vellum due to the more satisfying sensations it produces. Apparently it feels just like Nigel Farage's skin. They have however just found an Australian company which promises to go one better: http://www.toiletpaper.com.au/24-car...-paper-1-roll/

Ed.

 

Slam Dunk......Jonno don't even respond.... I remeber IZAL.... LOL....:o

Edited by Manxscorpio

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Slam Dunk......Jonno don't even respond.... I remeber IZAL.... LOL....:o

 

Exactly! Nigel Farage - somewhat abrasive and a lingering pain in the **se. Ed.

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Slam Dunk......Jonno don't even respond.... I remeber IZAL.... LOL....:o

 

Exactly! Nigel Farage - somewhat abrasive and a lingering pain in the **se. Ed.

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Boris as foreign secretary I think it's divine intervention needed now.

 

Boris foreign secretary, David Davis secretary of state for brexit and Liam Fox international trade secretary. Sounds like brexiteers have been handed the poison chalices, set up to fail.

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Boris as foreign secretary I think it's divine intervention needed now.

 

Boris foreign secretary, David Davis secretary of state for brexit and Liam Fox international trade secretary. Sounds like brexiteers have been handed the poison chalices, set up to fail.

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