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Security exercise held at sea onboard Mont St Michel

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From Plymouth's Evening Herald:

 

The introduction of sea marshals on French cross-Channel vessels has come a step closer as armed personnel took part in an on-board security exercise.

 

Brittany Ferries carried out the exercise as part of moves to make the highly trained military personnel part of the security network.

 

No plan has yet been announced to introduce armed marshals on routes between Plymouth and France but the exercise gave Brittany Ferries a chance to test out its response as it assesses future risks

 

Half-way through the crossing on the Mont St Michel ferry, travelling from Portsmouth to Caen, at about 5.30pm, around three hours before the ship's scheduled arrival in France, three armed French sea marshals wearing full military kit landed on the ship by helicopter.

 

The marshals, who are effectively part of the French military, patrolled the ship and carried out other security measures.

 

The exercise was part of a potential ramping up of security in light of recent terror attacks in France and elsewhere in Europe, amid fears there may be more to come.

 

With the nation on its highest level of security alert, French authorities are keen to be seen to be doing something positive, particularly on French-flagged vessels, to tackle potential security threats.

 

Public demands in France for increased security have accelerated rapidly in the last few weeks.

 

A Brittany Ferries spokesman said: "Access to outside decks was not allowed at the time of the helicopter's arrival. The security crew travelled with passengers to France, where they left the ship on foot.

 

"Security exercises like today's on board Mont St Michel give Brittany Ferries an opportunity to practise its incident response in partnership with other agencies.

 

"Safety and security are our highest priority and we operate according to robust procedures set out in the ISPS (International Shipping and Port Security) Code, an international framework endorsed by the International Maritime Organisation (IMO).

 

"We very much appreciate passengers' support during this exercise and thank them for travelling with Brittany Ferries".

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From Plymouth's Evening Herald:

 

The introduction of sea marshals on French cross-Channel vessels has come a step closer as armed personnel took part in an on-board security exercise.

 

Brittany Ferries carried out the exercise as part of moves to make the highly trained military personnel part of the security network.

 

No plan has yet been announced to introduce armed marshals on routes between Plymouth and France but the exercise gave Brittany Ferries a chance to test out its response as it assesses future risks

 

Half-way through the crossing on the Mont St Michel ferry, travelling from Portsmouth to Caen, at about 5.30pm, around three hours before the ship's scheduled arrival in France, three armed French sea marshals wearing full military kit landed on the ship by helicopter.

 

The marshals, who are effectively part of the French military, patrolled the ship and carried out other security measures.

 

The exercise was part of a potential ramping up of security in light of recent terror attacks in France and elsewhere in Europe, amid fears there may be more to come.

 

With the nation on its highest level of security alert, French authorities are keen to be seen to be doing something positive, particularly on French-flagged vessels, to tackle potential security threats.

 

Public demands in France for increased security have accelerated rapidly in the last few weeks.

 

A Brittany Ferries spokesman said: "Access to outside decks was not allowed at the time of the helicopter's arrival. The security crew travelled with passengers to France, where they left the ship on foot.

 

"Security exercises like today's on board Mont St Michel give Brittany Ferries an opportunity to practise its incident response in partnership with other agencies.

 

"Safety and security are our highest priority and we operate according to robust procedures set out in the ISPS (International Shipping and Port Security) Code, an international framework endorsed by the International Maritime Organisation (IMO).

 

"We very much appreciate passengers' support during this exercise and thank them for travelling with Brittany Ferries".

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Gosh, worrying times. If the marshals were to happen, would they be in military clothing or plain clothed.

I guess the fear is, someone onboard God forbid a attacking passengers as opposed to Dangering the vessel itself?

All very alarming.

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Gosh, worrying times. If the marshals were to happen, would they be in military clothing or plain clothed.

I guess the fear is, someone onboard God forbid a attacking passengers as opposed to Dangering the vessel itself?

All very alarming.

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Linking to the other thread, I think I must be a lone voice on here in finding the fact that the French are doing something about this obvious security threat as reassuring rather than alarming. Alarming is when the politicians spout on about how they are doing "everything possible" to protect the public and then actually doing nothing.

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Linking to the other thread, I think I must be a lone voice on here in finding the fact that the French are doing something about this obvious security threat as reassuring rather than alarming. Alarming is when the politicians spout on about how they are doing "everything possible" to protect the public and then actually doing nothing.

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But they're not. Transmamche at Newhaven and DFDS at Dover (well the Calais ships anyway) are French registered. The plan, according to BBC page, is that the patroks are going to board ships whilst in international waters until agreement is reached with the British to be able to cover UK waters too. On a "random but regular" basis, which means not on every sailing but enough for the thugs not to know whether there is a patrol on board or not so there is a deterrence factor. I hope the UK authorities do come do an agreement so they don't have to keep getting on and on leaving/entering UK waters.

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But they're not. Transmamche at Newhaven and DFDS at Dover (well the Calais ships anyway) are French registered. The plan, according to BBC page, is that the patroks are going to board ships whilst in international waters until agreement is reached with the British to be able to cover UK waters too. On a "random but regular" basis, which means not on every sailing but enough for the thugs not to know whether there is a patrol on board or not so there is a deterrence factor. I hope the UK authorities do come do an agreement so they don't have to keep getting on and on leaving/entering UK waters.

 

 

Just a guess (and not sure it would make a difference anyway), did the helicopter land *on* MSM, or were the people lowered? Perhaps the MSM was more suitable for this than other vessels. Have seen a pilot pick up off the Cote D'Albatre before but it was done by winching. I presume helipads have some kind of weight limit.

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Just a guess (and not sure it would make a difference anyway), did the helicopter land *on* MSM, or were the people lowered? Perhaps the MSM was more suitable for this than other vessels. Have seen a pilot pick up off the Cote D'Albatre before but it was done by winching. I presume helipads have some kind of weight limit.

 

Maybe it's BF trying to butter up the French government by being cooperative with them .

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Just a guess (and not sure it would make a difference anyway), did the helicopter land *on* MSM, or were the people lowered? Perhaps the MSM was more suitable for this than other vessels. Have seen a pilot pick up off the Cote D'Albatre before but it was done by winching. I presume helipads have some kind of weight limit.

 

Weight limit on the Irish Sea ferries is 3.5 tons (far as I know, that's the upper limit usually) - chances are they rapelled onboard.

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The weight limit is normally painted on the helipad, Pont-Aven's seems to indicate a limit of 5 tons and 4 tons for the Bretagne. I've seen a Sea King land on Pride of Hull for a medevac and I believe the pads on European Highlander and Causeway may be able to accommodate that type as well.

 

Preference always seems to be winching people on and off rather than landing.

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