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John M

Security, what is your opinion.

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I'm not concerned, the western channel's freight numbers in Q1 were up by 3% on last year with Q2 expected to show a larger increase, Le Shuttle Freight has just announced an new daily record of 3822 movements (June 8th) too and as goods traffic is the core of BF's business, the area in which most of their profit is made, I can see why Christophe Mathieu was rather buoyant when interviewed on Sky announcing Honfleur which has been designed to carry more heavy goods and less passengers than Normandie.

I'd be interested to see how Pax numbers are affecting Bretagne & NEx as these are the two vessels which would suffer with their particular freight restrictions and passenger centric focus.

I'm looking forward to Q3's figures with interest.

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7 hours ago, Paully said:

Passenger numbers were well down on the Bretagne on the Sunday night crossing..Les Abers, busy but not full, and the Gwen Ha Du bar was less than half full and not much of an atmosphere...mind you entertainment was poor. On arrival at At Malo there was no queuing on the steps to the car decks either.

 

I was surprised to see Bretagne so empty at the weekend too. Even though it's not yet school holidays, I was still expecting end of June (especially a Saturday!) to be far busier. I was sat in the Gwen Ha Du all morning and there can't have been more than 25 people in there. Having said that, it looked like there were a lot of cars boarding, so perhaps wasn't as bad as it looked. It may be possible that everyone had disappeared for an early lunch!

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http://www.dryadmaritime.com/safe-travels/

Countering terrorists and their acts of violence is best done through a layered and intelligence led approach; the latter of which stops them from getting to the point of attack in the first place. For every successful terrorist act that results in an examination of intelligence failures, there’s a vastly larger number of plots that are foiled before they are executed. This is achieved through diligent intelligence gathering and law enforcement activity by police forces and intelligence agencies. Effective action is also heavily reliant upon international cooperation and intelligence sharing, something that must continue in Europe whatever the outcome of the UK’s BREXIT process.

The next layer of defence comes from effective port and ship security, aimed at preventing terrorists from boarding vessels with weapons and explosive devices should they get to the port of departure. With the advent of the International Ship and Port Security (ISPS) Code, alongside traditional border controls in some areas, we have the ability to identify suspects and ensure that they do not embark with the means to conduct acts of violence. Whilst the ISPS code moves maritime transportation closer to aviation style security, the sheer volume and associated pressures make this less effective than the equivalent measures when boarding an aircraft.  Sadly, as evidenced by the recent atrocities in France where knives and vehicles have been used to diabolical effect, a terrorist group does not always need guns or bombs to conduct acts of violence. Put simply, security measures in ports and on board ships need to be diligently applied and quality controlled by well-trained and well-motivated security staff.

Should law enforcement and traditional security fail and a terrorist act takes place, the quality of the response is vital in reducing the impact of the situation and ensuring the safety of those affected. This is achieved through the execution of well-constructed, and regularly exercised, security and crisis management plans – in ports and on board vessels. It is also important to draw upon the assistance of additional support from the police and military to deal with such situations. Last week’s exercise by French forces at sea boarding the Mont St Michelwith a helicopter insertion is an example of how such forces need to be capable of taking control of a vessel to protect passengers and crew and bring a terrorist act to a successful conclusion. Such a demonstration of capability can act as a deterrent and is a confidence building measure for passengers. Rather than a pure capability demonstration of the boarding of a ship underway – let’s remember that it was pre-planned and unopposed – the boarding of the French-flagged vessel in transit was likely as a result of jurisdictional issues outside of UK territorial waters. If so, this is clearly an area for Anglo-French bi-lateral cooperation should such security measures become commonplace. The last thing we need is exploitable ‘seams’ between different security methodologies.

Edited by lewisrugby

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Without giving too much away, at ground and senior officer level there is an enormous amount of co operation and mutual respect,between the French and British Forces. They face the same enemy. That rapport has been built over many years and isn't about to change just because politics does. They may have had an intervention cross channel, but we will have monitored it and will be part of the de brief.. I'm also led to believe that the social side of such mutual events features French hospitality at its best😀...but we need to trust those in charge of the Forces and leave the Politicos to just balls everything up. It's the only thing they are good at, afterall.

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A couple of updates to the security at Roscoff yesterday afternoon.  Had the usual search of the car once checked in, but this time, a small yellow sticker with 'Contrôle sûreté' was attached to the windscreen afterwards.  I noticed a number of vehicles had this sticker.  There didn't appear to be any additional gendarmes, although one was making sure that dashcams were switched off.

There was also a large mobile scanning device for the freight.

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Don't have a problem being checked or 'stickered' if it helps keep us all safe, although some of the immigration control/customs at the British ports do not have a very pleasant demeanor in carrying out their duties!  Courtesy costs nowt!

 

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37 minutes ago, Fine Whine said:

hf_uk, you always look dodgy!

Chris

One was not travelling with one's regulars this time though Chris! :/ 

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46 minutes ago, BobCrox said:

A few years ago an FOI request revealed that the checks at Plymouth had never caught any illegal immigrants entering via BF.

I know for a fact that some of the dockers down there report that at least a few have been sent back. Perhaps not recorded if they are caught BEFORE leaving the secure area?!

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2 hours ago, hf_uk said:

I know for a fact that some of the dockers down there report that at least a few have been sent back. Perhaps not recorded if they are caught BEFORE leaving the secure area?!

I think they are caught through tip offs. Not by the security staff.

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On 28/12/2017 at 15:26, Solo said:

Probably easier for BF to take them back and not have the risk of fines for bringing them in.

I think there needs to be new security checks in some form to deal with this issue, whether they are onboard the ship during travel, or afterwards. There are always going to be people who are 'suspicious' and that is the truth, and 'if in doubt, always suss them out'. 

I think checks onboard could be dealt with, send a few people round, looking inside cars, in the boots etc, if anything is obstructing a view, bring the car owner down, and get them to unlock the car. That could genuinely work, and be fairly cost friendly, given a few office staff could do the job, when there isn't much to do. I'm sure someone here will find an issue with it though :)

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7 hours ago, kendl said:

Easiest way would be to use sniffer dogs.

Whilst folk are waiting to board I would suspect would be the easiest way , I did read a woman’s complaint that her children were going to go hungry as the French sniffer dog used to search her car had eaten her croissants.

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22 hours ago, Danish Ferry Person said:

I think checks onboard could be dealt with, send a few people round, looking inside cars, in the boots etc, if anything is obstructing a view, bring the car owner down, and get them to unlock the car. That could genuinely work, and be fairly cost friendly, given a few office staff could do the job, when there isn't much to do. I'm sure someone here will find an issue with it though :)

I don't think it would be fair to expect office staff to go looking for and challenging illegal immigrants or terrorists whenever they have a bit of time to spare.  That's not what they signed up for, it's risky enough for trained security officers but at least they agreed to the job.

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As said previously; with the form you fill in giving names, car reg etc and the ANPR cameras at the ports they know all about the passengers before you even arrive at "security". Once arrived at Plymouth and the security lass asked us where our grandson Aiden was? He often travelled with us as a toddler but was now at school!!!! They know!

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20 hours ago, neilcvx said:

Whilst folk are waiting to board I would suspect would be the easiest way , I did read a woman’s complaint that her children were going to go hungry as the French sniffer dog used to search her car had eaten her croissants.

Wouldn't you need to have everybody get out each vehicle before letting the dog carry out the search? If you have an illegal immigrant stowed in a vehicle and it is in a secure area where there should be no one then the dog could do the search quicker and with no inconvenience to the passangers.

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1 hour ago, kendl said:

Wouldn't you need to have everybody get out each vehicle before letting the dog carry out the search? If you have an illegal immigrant stowed in a vehicle and it is in a secure area where there should be no one then the dog could do the search quicker and with no inconvenience to the passangers.

I don't really see the inconvenience, everyone is just sitting there in limbo doing nothing anyway. The area beyond check in is controlled and vehicle owners are subject to whatever form of stop and search the police or customs officers deem necessary and the ship won't sail without you.

I'm more than happy to see both visual and physical deterrents at work. They can stop me as many times as they wish.

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