Jump to content
zuludelta

Are Stena taking a huge risk a Chinese yard?

Recommended Posts

9 hours ago, Hawser Trunnion said:

The problem with the vessels I've previously mentioned was that they were found not to comply with design specifications when they got into the water.  Berlin and Copenhagen, for example, were found to be too deep draughted for the Danish port of Gedser they were intended to serve.  After unsuccessfully trying to sell them their owners, Scandlines, had them massively rebuilt by the Danish Fayard yard.  I believe since entering service between Rostock and Gedser they have been very successful.  

I daresay Stena are hoping nothing like this happens with their ships but being Stena Line maybe they could find other work for them if rebuilding was found not to be possible or too expensive.

How does the process work then? Would a company like BF turn up at a yard with complete plans and say how much would it cost to build this or would they turn up with a specification and say how much would it cost for you to design and build a ship to a general specification?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It depends on the level of complexity and customization they want. 'X' ferry for the Med, or Asian markets for example would be pretty much ordered 'off-plan' and then the owner fits it out as they want without too much hassle. If you are talking about Honfleur..... an LNG ship with an entirely new bunkering mechanism, which has to be highly customised to fit in with the fleet, heritage of the company, themed outfitting, and the ports it will serve then there needs to be much closer collaboration between the two parties and things (generally) become a lot slower, and more expensive...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Other than buyers of Visentinis there are very few shipowners who would take a completely off the shelf design (Van der Giessen were another example but even their ships were heavily customised - Mont St Michel isn't immediately recognisable as a derivation of Stena Jutlandica for example).
 
Sometimes a yard will have a generic hull design that they apply to series of vessels, sometimes the shipowner goes to yards with a design created by a consultancy or even potentially in house. But however they get to the ultimate solution in both of the big markets for ferry newbuilds (Europe and Japan) the vast majority of ships are very bespoke to the operations they are ordered for - north European owners are no different to the rest when it comes to that.
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In the case of MHI, they have plenty of experience building passenger vessels and in particular ferries, including EUROPEAN CAUSEWAY, STENA NORDICA, and EUROPEAN HIGHLANDER.  A cruise ship is a very different proposition to a ferry, particularly a 124,500gt one.  It is perhaps notable though that Carnival have ordered two even larger cruise ships at a Chinese yard.

I think we need to look at who is managing the E-flexer project and just how big the Stena "sphere" is (these guys are truly global with their own oil drilling, property, finance, ship management, and even bunkering companies) - Stena RoRo/Teknik and Deltamarin.  Deltamarin also happen to be under the same ownership as the builder btw, and have well documented experience in the industry (including Cotentin/Amorique, Mont St Michel, and Port Aven).  Stena themselves have an enviable reputation in building all sorts of vessels, both for Stena themselves and others.  Stena have been present in China for years, and the suppliers that have been announced so far have not been from the Far-East.  CAT engines (MaK) gearboxes and propulsion, Novenco HVAC systems throughout, WE Tech shaft-generators and power takeoff, etc.  They also seem to have made an allowance in build time - steel cutting began yesterday for a vessel not expected until the end of 2019.  Compare that to HONFLEUR which is due in June '19, or Irish Ferries new vessel where the first steel was cut in April with delivery scheduled in May/June next year for example.  Chinese yards have been building ferries for years though its only recently they are getting good at it.  As HHV mentioned earlier, Stena have been building ferries in the Far-East since the 70's.  Theres even a design for a ship they intended to sell to Townsend Thoresen for the Western Channel in the mid-80's to be built in China, so they've been exploring the possibility of building ferries there for a long time.  Knud E Hansen and Gotlandsbolaget have proven a Chinese yard can build a ferry for Northern European service already in any case.  Of course things can go wrong, but that is the case with any ship building project or any project in any industry.

In this case though I suspect the build will be tightly-managed, and there are big stakes for the government owned yard as well - breaking into the lucrative Northern European ferry market and with one of the biggest names in world shipping!  With Stena Roro and Deltamarin present in China, its not a case that all this is being managed down a phone or keyboard from Europe.  This won't be the first ferry built at the yard by the way.  While not a passenger ferry, one of the Visentini companies has a 2500lm Roro under construction there (with an option for another).  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...