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Andy

HONFLEUR - New Build for Ouistreham Route

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7 hours ago, Hawser Trunnion said:

Historically there was a huge variation in the tonnage measurement of ships depending on how it was worked out.  American passenger liners were a good example.  The United States for example varied between 38,000 and 56,000 tons I believe and the present day Japanese Government way of working out ferries' tonnage makes Japanese ferries appear a lot smaller than they really are by European standards.  That's all I was meaning.

Gross Tonnage (GT) is a function of the volume of all of a ship's enclosed spaces (from keel to funnel) measured to the outside of the hull framing. The numerical value for a ship's GT is always smaller than the numerical values of gross register tonnage (GRT). Gross tonnage is therefore a kind of capacity-derived index that is used to rank a ship for purposes of determining manning, safety, and other statutory requirements and is expressed simply as GT, which is a unitless entity, even though it derives from the cubic feet of volumetric capacity.

Gross Register Tonnage (GRT) represents the total internal volume of a vessel, where one register ton is equal to a volume of 100 cubic feet(2.83168 m3); a volume that, if filled with fresh water, would weigh around 2,800 kg or 2.8 tonnes. GRT was dropped in 1994 and replaced by GT

 

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8 hours ago, richwarwicker said:

Gross Tonnage (GT) is a function of the volume of all of a ship's enclosed spaces (from keel to funnel) measured to the outside of the hull framing. The numerical value for a ship's GT is always smaller than the numerical values of gross register tonnage (GRT). Gross tonnage is therefore a kind of capacity-derived index that is used to rank a ship for purposes of determining manning, safety, and other statutory requirements and is expressed simply as GT, which is a unitless entity, even though it derives from the cubic feet of volumetric capacity.

Gross Register Tonnage (GRT) represents the total internal volume of a vessel, where one register ton is equal to a volume of 100 cubic feet(2.83168 m3); a volume that, if filled with fresh water, would weigh around 2,800 kg or 2.8 tonnes. GRT was dropped in 1994 and replaced by GT

 

http://www.themaritimesite.com/a-guide-to-understanding-ship-weight-and-tonnage-measurements/

'Kind of capacity derived index'... Eh?

A unitless entity... The writer needs to make their mind up, you can't have both, enclosed & unitless, not on this planet anyway.

Surely the writer is eluding to a dimensionless quantity which is unitless. In this case further study of continuum mechanics is required.

If GT was based on enclosed spaces then that by the laws of physics, matrix algebra, good old fashioned mathematics and basic common sense would indicate fixed dimensions and not any type of unitless/dimensionless quantity...an enclosed space has a capacity, it can be filled to a defined level due to volume constraints.

For a ships volume,  elastic deformation must be considered with a base number chosen after careful analysis using the numerical approximation method.

Elasticity is the dimensionless quantity due to movement and is not finite such as a unit of height, width or depth... an enclosed space.

These methods and solutions are based on linear infinitesimal isotropic elasticity and the Euler Bernoulli beam theory, they assume that the material in question - steel -  is elastic.

By building ships in blocks the moment distribution method can be used as they are small rigid frames rather than using the cantilever or portal frame method which are used on large framed structures. 

Stress is related to strain, the material, the steel, behaves the same regardless of from which direction the load is applied and deformations are small.

The numerical value of this elasticity is one component used to formulate the volume and is considered when determining a ships gross tonnage, it's not about weight.

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The first major milestone in the construction of the Honfleur will take place on Monday 12th March, with the cutting of the first piece of steel at the Flensburg shipyard.

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4 hours ago, Andy said:

The first major milestone in the construction of the Honfleur will take place on Monday 12th March, with the cutting of the first piece of steel at the Flensburg shipyard.

If that’s the case,  what’s being assembled at the moment?

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15 hours ago, jamie said:

If that’s the case,  what’s being assembled at the moment?

There will be lots of stuff being pre-fabricated in other shipyards.  By the time the keel is laid, most of the superstructure will already exist, ready to be shipped across as modules to just be bolted on.  Modern construction techniques are astonishing - as we have observed previously.

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7 hours ago, jamie said:

If that’s the case,  what’s being assembled at the moment?

As Gareth says steel cutting can take place in any of the yards FSG contract out to. Her keel isn't due to be layed until June, plenty of time for the current build on the stocks to be floated out.

Much if not all of YBY's superstructure has be built in Poland and floated across to FSG. I'm hoping the yard offer the same coverage of Honfleur as we've enjoyed for the Irish Ferries ship. 

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On 04/03/2018 at 17:01, jamie said:

If that’s the case,  what’s being assembled at the moment?

I would suggest judging by the outline shape it's another one of the RORO 4100 vessels being constructed for parent company Siem Offshore for future chartering.

Chris 

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Brittany Ferries have today launched a new mini website destinationhonfleur.com which will follow the construction of the Honfleur. 

The site will provide regular updates and insights into the construction, design and tradition surrounding the build.

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Cabins for families of up to 6 people sounds like a good move. I'll be interested to see how they are laid out. I can't recall that being mentioned before on here. Ed. 

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I'm sure this will prove to be a popular feature too! Imagine if there was a 'leader board'! :D

Quote

Honfleur promises play areas and digital spaces and even the opportunity to be captain of the ship, driving Honfleur on a big screen.

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6 hours ago, Macc2010 said:

Is this her?

424084AB-440A-4E3D-8036-170AA16E889B.png

No.  The general thinking is Honfleur will be the next one on the production line, they have only just started cutting the steel during March.

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7 hours ago, Solo said:

No.  The general thinking is Honfleur will be the next one on the production line, they have only just started cutting the steel during March.

https://www.destinationhonfleur.com/en

If you take a look at this link from Brittany Ferries dedicated to MV Honfleur it mentions keel laying as being around August of this year so I imagine there will be at least one further new build in the construction hall before she finally starts to take shape.

Chris

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On 4/2/2018 at 19:22, SecretFerryEnthusiast1 said:

I was looking at the webcam for where the honfluer will be constructed and there is a ship being built I wonder if it's the honfluer if not what ship is it

This is one of the two 4,1000 lane meter freight ro-ro's on order for Flensburger's parent company Siem Group.

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16 minutes ago, neilcvx said:

No carpets in the cabins the pensioners will stage an uprising. 😉

I dunno many older travellers have quite a young outlook.Viking Grace doesn't have cabin carpets, it doesn't detract from the quality plus you don't notice after a while.

They'll save a hell of a lot of money at refit time.

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