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Gareth

BF Refits 2017-18

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Perhaps they have found a way to simply slot the module into place, connect the cabling and seal the gaps underwater with a team of divers. Ed

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4 hours ago, TonyMWeaver said:

Surely, to install a Bow Thruster (Tunnel Thruster), the vessel will need to be drydocked again!

You'd think, but the previous work in dry dock has set her up for the installation.

 

4 hours ago, Cabin-boy said:

Perhaps they have found a way to simply slot the module into place, connect the cabling and seal the gaps underwater with a team of divers. Ed

Pretty much. It will be done with divers.

 

1 hour ago, James21072000 said:

Does that mean that Armorique might be making another visit to Portsmouth ?

I'm afraid not.

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Hi SC,

You obviously have some cast iron facts and sources and will probably turn out to be 100% correct.

However I spent half an hour talking to the hotel manager from Normandie yesterday and his interpretation was the delayed new blades (with the ubiquitous "Made in China" stamped on them) would not be fitted until the next dry docking at the end of the year. As he pointed each one is extremely heavy; BF have a blog somewhere showing winter maintenance on one of the ships with a good photo of the thruster assembly, but it's something like this:

image.png.12839b03fe4a323d4e4848371cafd807.png

I can't for the life of me envisage how even a team of divers could safely and securely attach these monsters, but only time will tell....:/

Chris

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4 minutes ago, Fine Whine said:

Hi SC,

You obviously have some cast iron facts and sources and will probably turn out to be 100% correct.

However I spent half an hour talking to the hotel manager from Normandie yesterday and his interpretation was the delayed new blades (with the ubiquitous "Made in China" stamped on them) would not be fitted until the next dry docking at the end of the year. As he pointed each one is extremely heavy; BF have a blog somewhere showing winter maintenance on one of the ships with a good photo of the thruster assembly, but it's something like this:

image.png.12839b03fe4a323d4e4848371cafd807.png

I can't for the life of me envisage how even a team of divers could safely and securely attach these monsters, but only time will tell....:/

Chris

But if it's just the blades which need attaching one by one, and they can do it in a sheltered dock with good visibility and no currents, then perhaps it's not so complicated. Ed

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8 minutes ago, Cabin-boy said:

But if it's just the blades which need attaching one by one, and they can do it in a sheltered dock with good visibility and no currents, then perhaps it's not so complicated. Ed

Well we'll find out soon enough Ed......:D

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On 31/03/2018 at 08:11, Fine Whine said:

Hi SC,

You obviously have some cast iron facts and sources and will probably turn out to be 100% correct.

However I spent half an hour talking to the hotel manager from Normandie yesterday and his interpretation was the delayed new blades (with the ubiquitous "Made in China" stamped on them) would not be fitted until the next dry docking at the end of the year. As he pointed each one is extremely heavy; BF have a blog somewhere showing winter maintenance on one of the ships with a good photo of the thruster assembly, but it's something like this:

image.png.12839b03fe4a323d4e4848371cafd807.png

I can't for the life of me envisage how even a team of divers could safely and securely attach these monsters, but only time will tell....:/

Chris

A team of divers certainly could not do this alongside in one day, it makes more sense to do the work at the end of the year.

Edited by TonyMWeaver

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Looking at those pictures makes me wonder.  It's curious how the rope could have got entwined with that lot!  Assuming the incident happened on departure from Ouistreham (?), you'd think that the thrusters would be pushing the vessel away from the quayside, in other words pushing water out towards the quay.  So even if any rope did stray into the vicinity, you'd think the wash from the thrusters would tend to push it away from the props rather than sucking it in.  Must have been a very unusual set of circumstances that caused a mooring line to get far enough into that tunnel to be chewed up by the blades.

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19 minutes ago, Gareth said:

Must have been a very unusual set of circumstances that caused a mooring line to get far enough into that tunnel to be chewed up by the blades.

Googling ropes and bow thruster, it seems more common than one would think and in most cases would be the rope at the side they are pushing away from.

I wonder what words of comfort were given by the Captain to the officer in charge of the ropes that day ?

Edited by David Williams

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Remember that when the blades are in the water they only weigh half what they do on land. Not sure what metal they are made of though.

If you Google 'replacing ship bow thruster blades' you will see that it is a common practice while the ship is afloat, either underwater or by trimming the vessel  to bring the tunnel above water.

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1 hour ago, Gareth said:

Looking at those pictures makes me wonder.  It's curious how the rope could have got entwined with that lot!  Assuming the incident happened on departure from Ouistreham (?), you'd think that the thrusters would be pushing the vessel away from the quayside, in other words pushing water out towards the quay.  So even if any rope did stray into the vicinity, you'd think the wash from the thrusters would tend to push it away from the props rather than sucking it in.  Must have been a very unusual set of circumstances that caused a mooring line to get far enough into that tunnel to be chewed up by the blades.

I agree Gareth but talking to Pat the other day it all happened in a storm, and with the bow thrusters going full throttle to push her off the berth the wash projecting back off the concrete jetty forced the ropes back underneath the stern and they were then sucked in from the starboard side, if that all makes sense!

However unusual the circumstances it completely mullered the whole assembly and was put down to "one of those things". I think BF are hoping their insurance policy will cover the considerable costs incurred to date...O.o

Chris

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3 minutes ago, Fine Whine said:

I agree Gareth but talking to Pat the other day it all happened in a storm, and with the bow thrusters going full throttle to push her off the berth the wash projecting back off the concrete jetty forced the ropes back underneath the stern and they were then sucked in from the starboard side, if that all makes sense!

However unusual the circumstances it completely mullered the whole assembly and was put down to "one of those things". I think BF are hoping their insurance policy will cover the considerable costs incurred to date...O.o

Chris

Thanks - yes it does Chris! Must have been a flipping long rope though! 😳

Could have been worse - could have pulled the whole winch assembly off the deck of the rope had gone tight.  Or cut through the ship like a cheese slicer!  Sounds like the rope did not go tight though, so they could view themselves as lucky the damage was confined to the thruster unit.

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2 hours ago, cvabishop said:

Not sure what metal they are made of though.

They tend to be of a more aluminum and stainless steel mix due to the intense cavitation they produce. The tunnels are also lined with stainless steel as cavitation is extremely corrosive, even the pressure of the air bubbles can cause severe damage without the added protective lining.

I wouldn't be surprised if the dry docking at Damen was to replace the lining and make good any other damage found in and around the tunnel.

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3 hours ago, Gareth said:

Looking at those pictures makes me wonder.  It's curious how the rope could have got entwined with that lot!  Assuming the incident happened on departure from Ouistreham (?), you'd think that the thrusters would be pushing the vessel away from the quayside, in other words pushing water out towards the quay.  So even if any rope did stray into the vicinity, you'd think the wash from the thrusters would tend to push it away from the props rather than sucking it in.  Must have been a very unusual set of circumstances that caused a mooring line to get far enough into that tunnel to be chewed up by the blades.

After seeing what discarded fishing gear does to a fast craft’s waterjets (Mannanan) can well imagine the damage ropes can do.  Fishing line/nets and impellers don’t mix, but impellers can pretty much shred and spit out most stuff so thought they would make light work of fishing stuff.  Obviously not.  

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2 hours ago, SecretFerryEnthusiast1 said:

I just got a reply and they said timings and place to be confirmed l

RS Divers do a lot of work on the ferries, they have removed a rope from the propeller of 'Etretat' and Condor's 'Commodore Goodwill' in the past while they've been alongside in Portsmouth Port. It's possible they will do this Blade replacement.

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On 3/31/2018 at 08:11, Fine Whine said:

Hi SC,

You obviously have some cast iron facts and sources and will probably turn out to be 100% correct.

However I spent half an hour talking to the hotel manager from Normandie yesterday and his interpretation was the delayed new blades (with the ubiquitous "Made in China" stamped on them) would not be fitted until the next dry docking at the end of the year. As he pointed each one is extremely heavy; BF have a blog somewhere showing winter maintenance on one of the ships with a good photo of the thruster assembly, but it's something like this:

image.png.12839b03fe4a323d4e4848371cafd807.png

I can't for the life of me envisage how even a team of divers could safely and securely attach these monsters, but only time will tell....:/

Chris

Draggin this one up a bit, but was watching a programme on the HMS QUEEN ELIZABETH, and it showed the propeller blades were fitted by divers post undocking - from the size of them blades replacing the Normandie's should be a doddle!

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