Jump to content
Andy

BF Confirm Charter of 'E-Flexer'

Recommended Posts

Is there actually a company called Brittany Ferries?  I was of the understanding that BF was just a marketing brand for the operating companies previously mentioned in the thread.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You may well be right, Gareth. I don't recall seeing BF on any credit card statements. I think it always comes up as something else. BAI perhaps. Ed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Gareth said:

Is there actually a company called Brittany Ferries?  I was of the understanding that BF was just a marketing brand for the operating companies previously mentioned in the thread.

No not in its own right since 1983. It's the group name. If it was the UK you could argue that the group is made up of a private owner operator, (BAI), regional governments (two SPC's) and banking (three EIG's) shipowners. It's why none of the mid to late '90's subsidies or payment deferments were seen as private company state aid. 

Crucially none of the monies for BAI charters or the purchase of the Superfast or Incat have derived from either SPC or the three recognised EIG's. Yes BAI have financed them through the same mutual bank but there is no link to SOMANOR or SOMABRET. 

The French authorities maintain that the group is:

"A national instrument for European planning and a means of satisfying national interests for strategic purposes."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is interesting the Chinese shipyard that are building the eflexers have been doing sea trials of the ropax that allows the building of the first eflexer to start.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Every time I see an artists impression I get this nagging feeling that the Stena E-Flexer design needs a bigger funnel. Not Dana Anglia style, but maybe about Val de Loire size.

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 09/10/2018 at 16:23, David Williams said:

I imagine there is a reasonable overlap between builds, The NI site has some nice pictures of the second eflexer being built.

https://www.niferry.co.uk/keel-laid-second-stena-e-flexer/

There’s a few more been added since then.  I’m adding them to the main page as I get them ;).

https://www.niferry.co.uk/stena-e-flexer-new-stena-ropax-ferries/

Progress has been quite rapid since they got going proper, with all the blocks for number 1 in place by the end of September!  It’s getting a little tricky to track things now as the hull numbers in true shipyard tradition are not in sequence 🙄

I believe BF’s second example (the LNG one) is yard number W0269.

 

Edited by tarbyonline
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Still a long way to go though.  

 

Slightly related but ownership of the AVIC Ship organisation that owns the Weihai (and Dingheng) yard looks like it is going to transfer to another state owned company China Merchants Heavy Industry to form the 4th largest state owned shipbuilding group in China.  CMHI already own yards in Shenzhen, Jiangsu, and Jinling (Changhang group).  Deltamarin will also move across as well as it’s part of AVIC ship too

Edited by tarbyonline
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, tarbyonline said:

Still a long way to go though.  

 

Slightly related but ownership of the AVIC Ship organisation that owns the Weihai (and Dingheng) yard looks like it is going to transfer to another state owned company China Merchants Heavy Industry to form the 4th largest state owned shipbuilding group in China.  CMHI already own yards in Shenzhen, Jiangsu, and Jinling (Changhang group).  Deltamarin will also move across as well as it’s part of AVIC ship too

Si looking at the Exel attachment at the bottom of the weekly shipping summit bulletin there's no yard number on there for any of them.

Thanks for the update.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, jonno said:

Si looking at the Exel attachment at the bottom of the weekly shipping summit bulletin there's no yard number on there for any of them.

Thanks for the update.

Understandably Mike hasn’t added them yet - number one is definitely W0263 though.  I did have yard numbers on NI Ferry Site, but as they are going to be out of sync I have removed them until I can map every vessel to a number.  I have a theory about the numbering but that’s all it is at present.

NEW GRAND PEACE has been handed over to her owners so now Weihai is concentrating solely on E-Flexer construction.

Edited by tarbyonline
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks like a very different construction method to Flensburger? 

Also - as it is China... is that bamboo scaffolding?

Edited by hf_uk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Andy said:

Construction has commenced on the fourth in the series of 'e-flexers' for Stena Line. (Brittany Ferries will be taking charter of the 3rd and 6th vessel.)

Press Release: http://news.cision.com/stena-line/r/stena-line-s-three-irish-sea-e-flexer-ships-now-in-construction,c2684885 

Stena-Line-Group-on-Twitter-From-steel-c 

image.thumb.png.f13e6ecb4b3a2bc7a2f3f2265d59a910.png

Yes, and if you look closely you can just see Jackie Chan dangling from the gantry crane. Plus, I've never seen the Chinese sky that blue in any picture ever before. Ed. 

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 28/11/2018 at 12:03, hf_uk said:

Looks like a very different construction method to Flensburger? 

Also - as it is China... is that bamboo scaffolding?

Very different – the same way ships have been built from the days of the Mary Rose if not before.

These days they call it integrated building (hull and superstructure) – ie start with the length of the keel, add frames and then add skin and interior, working upwards until you reach the top.

As opposed to modular block shipbuilding, as deployed for BF's Honfleur, the new aircraft carriers and other projects we've seen in recent years. Large sections of hull and superstructure – blocks – are fabricated (often off site) and then welded together on a slip or drydock. In some cases – as we've seen recently at Flensburg – many of those blocks originate at yards some distance away. 

Naming no names but... the supplier needs to make sure they are built to the correct specs for an accurate fit on delivery!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, kenw said:

Very different – the same way ships have been built from the days of the Mary Rose if not before.

These days they call it integrated building (hull and superstructure) – ie start with the length of the keel, add frames and then add skin and interior, working upwards until you reach the top.

As opposed to modular block shipbuilding, as deployed for BF's Honfleur, the new aircraft carriers and other projects we've seen in recent years. Large sections of hull and superstructure – blocks – are fabricated (often off site) and then welded together on a slip or drydock. In some cases – as we've seen recently at Flensburg – many of those blocks originate at yards some distance away. 

Naming no names but... the supplier needs to make sure they are built to the correct specs for an accurate fit on delivery!

Very interesting - thanks!

(although slightly strange that the Chinese are not up with more modern techniques?).... could this be a factor in cost of the vessel? i.e - speed of delivery ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
59 minutes ago, hf_uk said:

Very interesting - thanks!

(although slightly strange that the Chinese are not up with more modern techniques?).... could this be a factor in cost of the vessel? i.e - speed of delivery ?

(Do they need to be? It's often said that the availability of cheap labour in the UK is used as a substitute for investment in better technology. If you've got a near limitless supply of cheap labour, why bother with the upfront costs of modern techniques/machinery)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

AVIC have been using modular construction, and the hull in particular has been built very similarly to the process being used at FSG were small sections are fabricated (often including pipework and such) then brought together.  For the total vessel there are around 200 sections (from the top of my head).  The main difference at FSG is the superstructure blocks are much larger - dictated by the fact they are not only constructed but also fitted out off-site in Poland.  A similar process to what has happened in Weihai will have taken place in Gdansk, albeit off the hull.  The process FSG use is dictated by the lack of space at the yard and in particular on the covered slipway - not an issue for Avic!  Of course this has its potential pitfalls as well and in the case of Yeats the project took place at FOUR different sites if we include the fact that the steel was cut at a fourth yard!  Interestingly Visentini also have space problems and so build their hulls in two halves, both launched separately!!!

Avic certainly aren't building the E-Flexers plate by plate from the keel up as would have been the case in days gone by vessels (or from wood as in the case of the Marie Rose and which is a totally different process - you can't weld wood 🙄)!  Bamboo scaffolding is par for the course in South East Asia and can actually be stronger than western equivalents!  It's also a heck of a lot more sustainable with bamboo essentially being a (grass) weed.

Shameless plug time.  Some additional pictures added here

https://www.niferry.co.uk/stena-e-flexer-number-1-so-far/

I don't think it's been posted here yet, but Frédéric Pouget (and others) were at Avic Weihai during September for the project kick-off (in the form of a 2 day conference/workshop) for the dual-fuelled example. 

1 hour ago, penguin said:

(Do they need to be? It's often said that the availability of cheap labour in the UK is used as a substitute for investment in better technology. If you've got a near limitless supply of cheap labour, why bother with the upfront costs of modern techniques/machinery)

FSG and their sub-contractors don't necessarily use "local" labour either ;).  Polish shipbuilders and engineering concerns in particular can have some very creative recruitment processes which can mean labour coming from thousands of miles away.  Avic have had to adopt "modern" practices - you can't really build modern LNG ferries to current and future requirements without doing so (ask Ferguson Marine).  FSG have admitted to having issues building to the Safe Return to Port regulations (W.B YEATS is the first vessel they have had to do so for), so it will be interesting to see if Avic struggle similarly - mind you they have a much more realistic build time in which to iron out any problems!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
29 minutes ago, tarbyonline said:

FSG and their sub-contractors don't necessarily use "local" labour either ;).  Polish shipbuilders and engineering concerns in particular can have some very creative recruitment processes which can mean labour coming from thousands of miles away.

There have been some rumours and reports in the press over here about STX in St Nazaire using Eastern European labour and then telling those workers not to bother coming in on the day when they were inspected by the employment authorities. Ed. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, Cabin-boy said:

There have been some rumours and reports in the press over here about STX in St Nazaire using Eastern European labour and then telling those workers not to bother coming in on the day when they were inspected by the employment authorities. Ed. 

There were similar stories in Poland that were later proved.  I'm sure working conditions in Gdansk were better than Pjongyang though!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
These ships seem long and low on the sea, compared to the new Honfleur... shorter but higher
Edited by giloine

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×