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Galícia, Salamanca and Santona - Newbuilds for Spanish Routes (e-flexers)


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I have traveled many times on mostly the Spanish routes and what I have seen the pools are very rarely used.even in a slight swell the pool water can cause havoc with pool users and have seen it many times.with the ppl, area closed off for safety reasons.in my opinion they are not cruses ships,in other they are what they are a ferry.stay safe

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I believe anyone wanting such a thing would find one located just off the side of the ship...

She's  in...

Some more

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17 minutes ago, nodwad said:

I have traveled many times on mostly the Spanish routes and what I have seen the pools are very rarely used.even in a slight swell the pool water can cause havoc with pool users and have seen it many times.with the ppl, area closed off for safety reasons.in my opinion they are not cruses ships,in other they are what they are a ferry.stay safe

But many ferries have had swimming pools in the past. Think all Olau newbuilds, Tor twins, Dana Gloria and Val de Loire. Plus if Narronna on North Atlantic crossings can manage surely its something suitable for Brittany Ferries.

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15 minutes ago, Nick Hyde said:

But many ferries have had swimming pools in the past. Think all Olau newbuilds, Tor twins, Dana Gloria and Val de Loire. Plus if Narronna on North Atlantic crossings can manage surely its something suitable for Brittany Ferries.

There's a bit of a difference in being on a ferry heading to Spain taking 20 hours to one heading to Iceland taking the better part of 3 days plus the pools tend to just attract kids - encouraged by their parents in order to give them a a bit of peace and quiet.

On Pride of Bilbao the sauna etc tended to be empty and the tiny pool & jacuzzi were full of screaming teenagers.

 

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The pool area on PA takes up a lot of intermittently used space which could be better put to use for comfortable lounge seating for those who want to avoid having to sit in the bar area.

Plenty of opportunity for alfresco splashing when you get to your holiday destination.

I've never seen the point of pools deep in the bowels of the ship. Basically they are just partially flooded steel compartments. No comparison with a Lido area on a cruise ship.

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13 minutes ago, jonno said:

There's a bit of a difference in being on a ferry heading to Spain taking 20 hours to one heading to Iceland taking the better part of 3 days plus the pools tend to just attract kids - encouraged by their parents in order to give them a a bit of peace and quiet.

On Pride of Bilbao the sauna etc tended to be empty and the tiny pool & jacuzzi were full of screaming teenagers.

 

On the Pride of Bilbao the big drawback was screaming kids everywhere. Also the was just cold salt water. Nothing like onboard Finnjet which on its fastest crossings was a 24 hour crossing only.

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https://www.abports.co.uk/news-and-media/latest-news/2020/mv-galicia-makes-first-stop-at-abp-s-port-of-plymouth/

 

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ABP was delighted to welcome MV Galicia, Brittany Ferries’ newest vessel, to the Port of Plymouth last week.

Measuring 215 metres, she will be one of Brittany Ferries’ largest vessels, and therefore trials at Plymouth were conducted in close cooperation with Cattewater Harbour Commission and Brittany Ferries when she arrived at the port on Wednesday. These trials were successful, and she docked safely and efficiently.

Speaking about the arrival of Galicia at Plymouth, Steve Lawrie, Port Operations Manager at Brittany Ferries, said: “It was very satisfying for all of us at Brittany Ferries in Plymouth to welcome our brand new ship Galicia to Millbay Docks. The berthing trials went perfectly, proving the ship can operate from Plymouth if needed.

“Galicia’s arrival at Plymouth will help free our Brittany Ferries’ flagship Pont-Aven, offering an additional weekly round trip from Plymouth to Santander, starting in March 2021. This will double the frequency and capacity on that route, so it is great news for the city of Plymouth and our customers who like using the port.”

With the success of the trials at Plymouth, it means Galicia’s sister ships, Salamanca and Santona - arriving in 2022 and 2023 respectively – can operate safely from Plymouth as well.  

Throughout the Covid-19 pandemic, ABP have been working with Britany Ferries to ensure we offer flexibility to respond to the changing needs of their operations as they modernise their fleet.

Speaking about the partnership, Tom Batchelor, Port Manager, South West, said: “We were extremely excited to welcome the Galicia to Plymouth on Wednesday, demonstrating our ability to meet the demand of Brittany Ferries future fleet upgrades. It supports the positive news that the Pont Aven will be making an additional weekly trip to Santander from Plymouth next March onwards which we look forward to seeing.”

Despite the pandemic, by the end of September, Plymouth saw an additional 3 calls of Brittany Ferries’ Cap Finistere with over 248 freight units, 1,095 vehicles and over 1,800 passengers.

 

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1 hour ago, Jim said:

The picture in the article is stunning as well as the good news from the port that they will accept the Galicia.

I suspect that there will be a number of  calls this winter - presumably BF have made arrangements with Border Force etc for how this can be manned if required.

Edited by David Williams
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Hopefully ABP might open their wallet and update the terminal slightly - it’s a bit of time warp inside. Toilets are alright, but the cafe is a bit of an embarrassment.

plot C2 of Millbay is starting - so the actual terminal itself is kind of letting the area down. And that’s difficult to say for Millbay!

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I for one will only use Plymouth as a last resort,the customs are chaotic and what bunch of missable people they are(could of used stronger words)the last time I was there kids were throwing stones from above and not a very pleasant walkinto town and back when it is dark.stay safe

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There is currently a lot of work being carried out on board Galicia in the passenger accommodation areas with much of the work going on in the disabled cabins to meet the French regulations, and more bits are being added to the ship, sounds like Brittany Ferries branded signage etc. The date of entering dry dock is likely to change to Oct 26th with re-flagging on Oct 27th.

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11 minutes ago, Jim said:

I'm not surprised at things like signage fit-out etc, but surprised that cabins as-is don't meet regulations.

It could be visual alarms for deaf passengers or simply the information on the back of the door that needs adding. Ed

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Think all cities have their problems - but Plymouth is a safe city. Yes we have a bit of drugs (courtesy of our friends further up line), we have anti social, but in comparison it is quite safe.

As for customs - anyone who works for the HMRC has to be unhelpful and unfriendly. Never seen a happy tax man, and for heaven sake, do not crack a joke when the VAT inspector comes!

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8 hours ago, David Williams said:

The picture in the article is stunning as well as the good news from the port that they will accept the Galicia.

I suspect that there will be a number of  calls this winter - presumably BF have made arrangements with Border Force etc for how this can be manned if required.

I agree, and the acknowledgement of double Pont Aven Spain rotations (and all the possibilities that offers) is great too. Whatever next? Duty free mini cruises without the need for a coach trip? Maybe even an upgrade to foot passenger facilities at the port. Who knows. As long as covid facilitates once things are back to full swing next spring 

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1 hour ago, hf_uk said:

Maybe even an upgrade to foot passenger facilities at the port.

Not difficult hf_uk, even the ancient Egyptians must have transported tourists at the time up to the pyramids with more flair than Plymouth currently offers...
 

1 hour ago, hf_uk said:

 As long as covid facilitates once things are back to full swing next spring 

I would love to be as optimistic as you, but without politicising the thread I just can’t see « full swing » being on the menu by next spring. I would dearly love to be proved wrong though....😳

Chris

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30 minutes ago, TonyMWeaver said:

My last comment was meant to go on the New Build 'Galicia' thread, not sure why I posted it here. You can move it if you want.

Bear with me and I'll get it moved shortly 

(Originally read that as the system had done it which seemed weird)

Edited by Jim
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4 minutes ago, Cabin-boy said:

Clicks fingers.

"Jeeves, stop dusting my model ferries for a moment, I've got a job for you..." 

😉

Ed

It's more I'm currently feeding an 11 week old! ;)

... And in no way confused by the silly method the forum has for moving posts .. should be all done 

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