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The Ferry Man

Portsmouth Berth 4 to be replaced

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It's great news they are investing for the future, signs of a thriving port.

 

May I suggest they set their sights on the foot passenger arrangement next; I can't be the only one who finds it an aberration....

 

Chris

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Not sure what the picture is of, but it can't be the new linkspan as the article says that is still being designed and it isn't any of the existing ones.

 

Not surprised berth 4 is due for replacement. It is by far the most heavily used linkspan at PIP, and does not have the width of berths 2 and 3.

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It's an artist's impression of what they think it will look like I suppose. Does anyone else think they could have perhaps got a British company to do the work given the current political situation? Ed.

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The picture in the article is of the type of linkspan installed in Dunkirk and Boulogne, more that likely a stock (and reversed) picture of Dunkirk one used by DFDS on Quai de Ramsgate being delivered to the port in 2005.

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I'm guessing the image in the article is what the new structure will look like? Is there any advantage to having twin ramps?

 

 

Berth 4 is the one currently used by both Caen ships George so twin ramps are a necessity - they're replacing like with like, and as Gareth says it's the most heavily used in the port. Being that much wider it should speed up disembarkation, at least until the queue at the Customs booths......:mad:

 

Chris

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Berth 4 is the one currently used by both Caen ships George so twin ramps are a necessity - they're replacing like with like, and as Gareth says it's the most heavily used in the port. Being that much wider it should speed up disembarkation, at least until the queue at the Customs booths......:mad:

 

Chris

 

 

Hi Chris. When I said twin ramps I was referring to what looks in the image two ramps which go up either side which connect to the upper level.

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It probably speeds up loading as people don't have to worry about watching what the car to their left or right is doing and can simply follow the one in front. But when unloading it might be slower as you then have to merge the flows with at least one crossing the lower level traffic to get into the lanes leading to the passport control booths. Ed.

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Another advantage is it probably takes up a bit less space - the ramps are all down at the same time, compared to the current situation where the upper deck ramp is rather long, although this is wider, so maybe a issue with access to the pier?

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Maybe the illustration was just meant to show a Ravestein product. As the article suggests Ravestein have done a lot of work at the PIP. I noticed a Ravestein manufacturer's plate on one of the linkspans when last there. So it's a case of waiting and seeing.

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Hi Chris. When I said twin ramps I was referring to what looks in the image two ramps which go up either side which connect to the upper level.

 

Hi George,

 

Yes ok I see what you mean and sorry for the misunderstanding. Timmy is right, here is a link showing the destination of the object in the picture, namely Dunkerque http://www.marad.be/page/dk2005.html.

 

The advantage of these self contained floating units is they deliver all traffic disembarking from a twin deck ferry to a fixed point, just as they do from a fixed point for embarkation. At PIP this would mean removal of the ramps leading to the upper vehicle deck, installed at considerable cost at the time. We'll have to wait until the end of the year and see what they actually do install.

 

Chris

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I see from the link in Post #13 the cost of this illustrated unit is almost EUR 8 millions which is rather more than I thought and serves to show the difficulties of a port like Portland, Dorset, in starting a ferry service to France when they haven't got a linkspan. The start-up costs may be prohibitive.

 

I'd guess the PIP's new Berth 4 will be much like Berth 3 since the latter is the one Ravestein have already rebuilt.

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Well, there are linkspans and linkspans. Portland would probably not need anything more sophisticated than a simple single level one initially and plenty of ports seem to be able to install them. There may even be a second hand double-decker going cheap from Portsmouth next year! Or they could commandeer and relocate the one already in place at Weymouth relatively inexpensively?

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Worth adding too that Portland, like Poole and Weymouth, experiences the smallest tidal ranges of anywhere in the Channel so any linkspan installed there would not have to cope with large tidal ranges. Typically the range is only just over a metre in those parts, even at Springs, and often less than a metre at neaps.

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Worth adding too that Portland, like Poole and Weymouth, experiences the smallest tidal ranges of anywhere in the Channel so any linkspan installed there would not have to cope with large tidal ranges. Typically the range is only just over a metre in those parts, even at Springs, and often less than a metre at neaps.

 

..... which makes it surprising Portland was never able to achieve anything. Unlike Portsmouth maybe Portland's problem is its abysmal road links.

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Or they could commandeer and relocate the one already in place at Weymouth relatively inexpensively?

 

If the maintenance of the Weymouth linkspan was as good as the maintenance of the harbour walls I doubt it would be of any use to anyone but a scrap metal dealer.

 

 

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If the maintenance of the Weymouth linkspan was as good as the maintenance of the harbour walls I doubt it would be of any use to anyone but a scrap metal dealer.

 

 

It may be the link span which is holding up the rest of the port so they don't dare to remove it. Ed.

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On 03/02/2017 at 00:57, Hawser Trunnion said:

Maybe the illustration was just meant to show a Ravestein product. As the article suggests Ravestein have done a lot of work at the PIP. I noticed a Ravestein manufacturer's plate on one of the linkspans when last there. So it's a case of waiting and seeing.

May be this is the correct thread in which to discuss the design of PIP4 and maybe I was wrong to suggest the illustration was just an illustration.  Maybe the new linkspan will be like the one in the illustration and, if so, different from PIP3, the PIP's other two-tier linkspan. It's a popular design.  Boulogne and Dunkerque have similar and three of this type have been ordered for the Calais port project. I look forward to seeing what does in fact turn up!

Edited by Hawser Trunnion
Correcting typo.
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On 03/02/2017 at 09:42, Fine Whine said:

 

 

On 03/02/2017 at 09:42, Fine Whine said:

 

Device playing up -- again!  Thanks for the link in the post referred to above in my attempts to quote it.  Excellent photos.  This will be something of a quantum leap for the PIP if indeed if the new PIP4 is like the one depicted.  Presumably all the existing metalwork will have to be removed and the site prepared to receive the replacement structure on its arrival under tow from Deest as in the picture.

 

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I understand that the old linkspan has been brought back into use after delivery of the new one was delayed by bad weather.  Installation has apparently been rescheduled for late February.

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3 hours ago, Gareth said:

I understand that the old linkspan has been brought back into use after delivery of the new one was delayed by bad weather.  Installation has apparently been rescheduled for late February.

Not surprising really.  I thought there was a dearth of news on this topic.  Hopefully there will be plenty of publicity when the new facility eventually does arrive.

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I arrived on Armorique yesterday morning and she used berth 4 as well. Unfortunately the hydraulics on the ramp were playing up so it took an age (at least 15 minutes) for the fingers to come down.

Back out on her again tonight, hopefully all will run smoothly this time...9_9

Chris

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