Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Andy

French & British Fisherman Clash in Baie de Seine

Recommended Posts

Isn't this the inevitable consequence of the present situation? We were French fishermen and thought the UK fishermen were destroying our fishing area by over fishing because they weren't interested as they would no longer have access then perhaps it is understandable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The French have an agreed date to start fishing in this zone, and, a good week before, a bunch of British boats turn up, as indeed, the have been doing for several years.

All the French ask in this case is that everyone waits till the same date.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All this has done is fuel the UKIP/Brexit supporters who think we should send the Navy over protect our boats, they are going ape on social media saying this is what should happen.  No, the British boats are going over ahead of time and grabbing all the goodies so the French have every right to respond.  After Brexit we may not be able to fish those waters anyway if we are taking advantage, so the British fishermen responsible are making an eventual rod for their own backs.  Why should the Navy protect our boats when we are in the wrong.

Anyway, one Naval ship who won’t be going over is HMS Diamond - we have her for the Air Festival and I have a ticket to visit her, so she is spoken for....

Edited by Khaines

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sounds to me, from what is being said, that the French fisherman have a legitimate grievance.  Problem is, as always, the substance of their complaint gets lost in their methods.  However understandable the grievance, breaches of maritime law like this can never be justified.  The sea is a dangerous place - as fishermen know more than most.  And there should never be any compromise on good seamanship whilst at sea.  So, sadly, when they conduct themselves like this, the genuine point gets buried and dangerous lawlessness becomes the headline story.  As we always tell the kids, two wrongs do not make a right and putting yourself in the wrong takes you away from being in the right.

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

French, Belgian, Spanish et al trawlers never fish illegally resulting in tonnes dead sea life tossed back overboard do they? the little dears. No, we have no need for HMS' Tyne, Mersey, Severn and Clyde of the Fishery Protection Squadron, not to mention the aerial recon either.

60% of all EU fish is caught within British jurisdiction.

I notice no one has mentioned that the UK can fish the area all year round, no one has jumped the gun, no one has sailed over ahead of time. It is all legitimate. The French can only fish the area from October until May... so why are the fishermen out there in August?

Twist it as you like, the French are at fault not the English and Scottish fishermen.

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, jonno said:

French, Belgian, Spanish et al trawlers never fish illegally resulting in tonnes dead sea life tossed back overboard do they? the little dears. No, we have no need for HMS' Tyne, Mersey, Severn and Clyde of the Fishery Protection Squadron, not to mention the aerial recon either.

60% of all EU fish is caught within British jurisdiction.

I notice no one has mentioned that the UK can fish the area all year round, no one has jumped the gun, no one has sailed over ahead of time. It is all legitimate. The French can only fish the area from October until May... so why are the fishermen out there in August?

Twist it as you like, the French are at fault not the English and Scottish fishermen.

 

I quite agree, although British fishermen cannot have it both ways. They've complained bitterly for years about French and Spanish trawlers, but are quite happy to use the same rights.

 

It's actually a good case for more joined up regulation on fishing. It's admirable the French have a conservation plan in place, but if boats from any other state can use those waters, it rather defeats the point.

Edited by penguin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is difficult to get to the truth of claims re fishing but smashing into other boats is taking things to extremes.

I have seen reports that even if the UK regain control of their fishig rights, most of the UK fishing capacity has been bought up by a small number of foreign companies together with the boats as well so where is the benefit to us?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, jonno said:

I notice no one has mentioned that the UK can fish the area all year round,

I thought I'd leave it to you! 

But if that's the agreement then both sides should respect it and go through the proper channels to air their grievances. But then that's not really the French way, is it? 😀 Ed. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For years French boats have been working our waters when our boats cannot work because they have no quota. Just look on Marine traffic around Devon and Cornwall a mass of French boats, now it's the other way they don't like it.

The only thing the French have right is it should be the same rules for everyone, you would think the EU would make that happen they clamp down on our fishermen on everything else.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The rules should be the same for everyone, everyone should only be allowed to fish at the same time. I can appreciate how this makes the French angry but they should air this appropriately and not take the action they did.

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is what my local Super U is selling this evening. Clearly they don't want anyone fishing them but are perfectly happy to buy, cook and eat them! 😕 Ed. 

DSC_0028.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are many "gisements" of scallops around the French coast. Some are entirely natural, whilst some are restocked regularly with young shellfish. Most areas are covered by dates of open and closed season for French boats. Hence, you will still find scallops at Super U, but not coming from that area.

The unwritten agreement covering that area was that the French were OK about British vessels, of similar size to their own, fishing when they wanted, but that the larger vessels would stay away. Just look at the size of the Peterhead boat!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree, Colin, that they could well be from 'farmed' stocks. But as the label states they are from 'Sous zone de Pêche V11.  Manche et Mers Celtiques' there's a good chance some of them were plucked from the Baie De Seine.

Résultat de recherche d'images pour "sous zone de peche 27 V11"

I also agree that the Peterhead boat was far bigger then the French vessels, but if quotas are applied per vessel and per day then the size only has an impact on the efficiency of the operation and the time they need to be at sea for. Ed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Look closer.........

The MACDUFF fish carton to the right States they are Scottish........see attached.

The Coquille are allegedly Scottish (origine Ecosse) even though they are fished from Zone 27. Thats fair. is it??

The could well have been fished and landed by by the big blue  Scottish boat, the Honeybourne 3 maybe, landed at Shoreham , Yes Shoreham,! and directly onto the BF ferry at Portsmouth for transfer to Rungis (big fish market and home of Super U) . Thats fair is it ????

Violent Protest wrong? Tell the Pankhurst Family and all UK women that .

Would you drink a Bordeaux bottled in the Loire?

 

Capture.JPG

Edited by alleeganger10
added content

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, I had seen that but given they are based in Aberdeen I assumed they were simply the supplier and the scallops could have been fished from anywhere in the relevant zone which is clearly displayed (Aberdeen itself is in a different zone). Macduff is the company which processed the scallops certainly, which presumably gives them the Scottish origin status. Ed. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Cabin-boy said:

Yes, I had seen that but given they are based in Aberdeen I assumed they were simply the supplier and the scallops could have been fished from anywhere in the relevant zone which is clearly displayed (Aberdeen itself is in a different zone). Macduff is the company which processed the scallops certainly, which presumably gives them the Scottish origin status. Ed. 

It turns out they've been in trouble for flouting conservation rules before too... https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/scallop-wars-honeybourne-iii-france-channel-fishing-shellfish-latest-a8512581.html

 

Perhaps the situation isn't as clear cut as it was first presented.

  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know of one scalloper near us that has paid substantial fines in the past, Scalloping is one fishery where they can make good money, if other fisheries are closed to them they are prepared to push it.  Sadly the days of catching what is there are gone, you need a licence for every fish you catch, hence the Scallops are now getting hammered.  Incedently I think Scalloping is a destructive way of fishing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, penguin said:

It turns out they've been in trouble for flouting conservation rules before too... https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/scallop-wars-honeybourne-iii-france-channel-fishing-shellfish-latest-a8512581.html

 

Perhaps the situation isn't as clear cut as it was first presented.

You mean to say that all this trouble is the fault of the Scots? Well that does surprise me! I thought the undersized catch problem had been resolved but perhaps with the dredging technique it's not so easy to filter out the smaller shellfish. There is still the question of the French ships using violent methods to get their point across. The fact they threw stones at the British ships suggests a certain level of advance planning and premeditated aggression. Ed. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dredging is intrinsically destructive, it tears up the seabed which takes ages to recover.

Fishing generally is not very eco friendly in practice. The various companies have little interest in conservation and management of stocks and simply wish to maximise catches regardless of the consequences. Many areas of the world are now pretty much fished out from pure greed.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Cabin-boy said:

 I thought the undersized catch problem had been resolved but perhaps with the dredging technique it's not so easy to filter out the smaller shellfish. 

In Scallop dredging in France the crewmen of the boats have  gauges if the shell of the Coquille is less that 10cm across the shoulders It is not allowed to be landed, and o is thrown back to be caught again. Unlike Pelagic and other trawling methods the fish survive this experience . We are always amused that UK sold coquille, for example in our local Sainsbury's,  are always in shells which are smaller than could be landed in France , and always sold in shells, ie not just Noix. In France Noix or whole, tops bottoms and Noix.

In January we walked Omaha Beach after  the storms, lots of live Coquille were washed up on the beach we them back into the receding tide, so that they may be caught.

As CVA says dredging is destructive BUT The French Government via IFREMER monitor the Biomass of Coquille in the bay of the Seine and other grounds and set catch limits accordingly.

Anyone who has visited Port en Bessin Beach will have seen the mass of shells beneath the Tour Vauban, these are in fact Dechetts (waste)  from the Marrayeur processing that goes on in the Port, thats why the majority of shells are tops and no shell of juveniles are found.  Its illegal to dump the shell in the sea nowadfays, they have been there for a long time.

The "Scottish" Noix  in the  posts above will never have been to Scotland even for processing, they would not stand the journey in a refrigerated truck all that way to be deshelled . In P en B there is a centre de marrayage  where the noix are manually deshelled.

 

 

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Scallops caught around the British Isles, the coasts of Scotland, Ireland, Wales and the I.O.M can be 85mm as they are known as "queenies'. The sea bed scraped larger 100-110mm sources mainly around the French coast are kings... apparently???

I assume the supermarkets just sell them as scallops regardless.

The French scallops processed by Macduff in Scotland travel direct by fishing boat not by truck.

Edited by jonno

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 30/08/2018 at 20:46, jonno said:

Scallops caught around the British Isles, the coasts of Scotland, Ireland, Wales and the I.O.M can be 85mm as they are known as "queenies'. The sea bed scraped larger 100-110mm sources mainly around the French coast are kings... apparently???

I assume the supermarkets just sell them as scallops regardless.

The French scallops processed by Macduff in Scotland travel direct by fishing boat not by truck.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...