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Brexit effect on BF

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14 minutes ago, Manxscorpio said:

of course….?

Sorry extra costs. Normally extra costs leads to lower employment but perhaps you have other economic factors which will turn this around. It will be interesting to see what they are.

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5 minutes ago, imprimerie said:

Sorry extra costs. Normally extra costs leads to lower employment but perhaps you have other economic factors which will turn this around. It will be interesting to see what they are.

Unemployment is and will always be a factor built into government budgets - as technology advances less employees are required - isn't that a good thing?

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39 minutes ago, Manxscorpio said:

Unemployment is and will always be a factor built into government budgets - as technology advances less employees are required - isn't that a good thing?

But do we need to add  this figure? Socially you have to have a plan if you can see a rise in unemployment.People have to have money to live.The state could end up with a large bill and who is going to pay it? 

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2 hours ago, imprimerie said:

It must be very worrying for those at BF. Increased controls at ports will mean time and money which in turn someone will have to pay for.Either the customer or BF or both.The one thing that makes Brexit special is no one can predict what will happen after the 29th March.Perhaps after the vote in parliament in January things will be clearer.

There comes a point when the length of time you sit in your car waiting to clear customs gets too long and you decide to not bother and go elsewhere for your holidays, that’s the crux of the matter no one knows how long how bad it will be it’s a very realistic possibility that if it gets so bad some folk might not book again with BF.

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5 hours ago, David Williams said:

that is why Ireland is purchasing land around it's ports and other Countries are doing likewise.

Within 18 months Le Havre will be the biggest port in France and is rapidly gaining on the likes of Antwerp, their expansion has nothing to do with Brexit. Nor has most of the work being done elsewhere in Northern France.

Ouistreham's expansion has nothing to do with borders either. Anything in the press regarding Portsmouth, Plymouth or Poole, how about Roscoff, St Malo & Cherbourg? No there isn't, nor are there any noises coming out of Spain.

As for Dublin and however much land they think they need, what has it to do with Brittany Ferries, surely that's a topic for the "Other Ferry Operations thread?

 

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15 hours ago, neilcvx said:

I understand your commitment to Le Havre but that’s just a set of assumptions which are not based upon any facts whatsoever, I would expect BF will still be able to get customers on and off the ferry in the same amount of time post Brexit whether they clear customs in the same time is another matter, also your assumptions don’t take into account a fact that has been pointed out here over and over again BF don’t own most of their ferries so can’t simply move them from port to port .

I am telling you about a project reported by a senior officer of the port of Le Havre.

for the moment the project to study would be to cross twice a day from Le Havre with one boat (this Spring) >>> Etretat and after NORMANDIE.

 
 
 
 
234/5000
 
 
Ouistreham has significantly developed after the departure of P & O Le Havre ... it is not engraved in the marble that Ouistreham will remain the flagship line. I think Le Havre can do as well as Ouistreham.
Edited by LHCity

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8 minutes ago, LHCity said:

for the moment the project to study would be to cross twice a day from Le Havre with one boat (this Spring) >>> Etretat and after NORMANDIE.

 

Not sure how that would work, a ship can only do 3 crossings in 24 hours which averages out at 1.5 per day in each direction. 

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1 hour ago, David Williams said:

Not sure how that would work, a ship can only do 3 crossings in 24 hours which averages out at 1.5 per day in each direction. 

DAY 1

LE HAVRE > PORTSMOUTH

9:30 > 14:00 ETRETAT / NORMANDIE

23:30 > 8:00 ETRETAT / NORMANDIE

PORTSMOUTH > LE HAVRE

16:00 > 22:00 ETRETAT / NORMANDIE

23:30 > 8:00 BAIE DE SEINE / GALLICIA > from Bilbao Portsmouth

DAY 2

LE HAVRE > PORTSMOUTH

9:30 > 14:00 BAIE DE SEINE / GALLICIA > to Portsmouth Bilbao

16:00 > 22:00 ETRETAT / NORMANDIE

PORTSMOUTH > LE HAVRE

9:30 > 14:00 ETRETAT / NORMANDIE

23:30 > 8:00 ETRETAT / NORMANDIE

DAY 3

LE HAVRE > PORTSMOUTH

9:30 > 14:00 ETRETAT / NORMANDIE

23:30 > 8:00 ETRETAT / NORMANDIE

PORTSMOUTH > LE HAVRE

16:00 > 22:00 ETRETAT / NORMANDIE

23:30 > 8:00 SALAMANCA > from Santander Portsmouth

DAY 4

LE HAVRE > PORTSMOUTH

9:30 > 14:00 SALAMANCA > to Portsmouth Santander

16:00 > 22:00 ETRETAT / NORMANDIE

PORTSMOUTH > LE HAVRE

9:30 > 14:00 ETRETAT / NORMANDIE

23:30 > 8:00 ETRETAT / NORMANDIE

DAY 5

LE HAVRE > PORTSMOUTH

9:30 > 14:00 ETRETAT / NORMANDIE

23:30 > 8:00 ETRETAT / NORMANDIE

PORTSMOUTH > LE HAVRE

16:00 > 22:00 ETRETAT / NORMANDIE

23:30 > 8:00 BAIE DE SEINE / GALLICIA > from Bilbao Portsmouth

[…]

Edited by LHCity

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2 minutes ago, Khaines said:

Yes, woke up to that one on the news this morning.  Although not BF related, it got me thinking about Weymouth and Portland.  Could the Government pay Weymouth to upgrade it’s facilities as well, also add Portland to the list?

It is BF related:

'Three suppliers were awarded a total of £107.7m:

  • £46.6m to the French company Brittany Ferries
  • £47.3m to Danish shipping firm DFDS
  • £13.8m to British firm Seaborne Freight' 

Ed

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"Brittany Ferries told the BBC it was contracted to add 19 weekly return sailings to three of its routes: Roscoff to Plymouth, Cherbourg to Poole and Le Havre to Portsmouth - a 50% increase on its current schedule."

I suspect most of the extra sailings will be through Portsmouth. I wonder how this will effect 2019 timetables.

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57 minutes ago, Cabin-boy said:

It is BF related:

'Three suppliers were awarded a total of £107.7m:

  • £46.6m to the French company Brittany Ferries
  • £47.3m to Danish shipping firm DFDS
  • £13.8m to British firm Seaborne Freight' 

Ed

I meant not BF related in terms of thinking about Weymouth and Portland which are not BF ports, sorry I wasn’t clear there.  I doubt they will be, but was just thinking about other port facilities that could be utilised as well as BF ones.

 

 BF put Barfleur back on her double rotations again which would please a lot of people.  

Edited by Khaines
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It's a strange situation when the government spends £107.7m on something that it says won't happen and it's seen as good news.😉

  • Like 3

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11 minutes ago, G4rth said:

It's a strange situation when the government spends £107.7m on something that it says won't happen and it's seen as good news.😉

Quite possibly money for nothing.

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I was struggling with the logic of how more sailings were going to reduce a problem caused by border checks but I suppose the idea is to draw freight away from the Dover routes where there is a physical land limit on expanding customs checks, to ports with more capacity? Not sure what would stop DFDS from simply moving tonnage away from Dover to another port ( as Dover will not be able to handle the freight the ships have the capacity for for a while) and be paid handsomely for it?

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Creating the extra crossings in April with current ships will mean a major change to the timetables on the current routes with disruption to many plans with some overnight crossings disappearing.  It may be better in the summer if Etretat stays.

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BF Press Release:

 

UK government contract – additional freight capacity for a no-deal Brexit

28th December 2018

 

Brittany-Ferries-Armorique-wearing-new-lFollowing confirmation of the contract agreed with the Department for Transport (DfT), Brittany Ferries has outlined steps being taken to change sailing schedules for 2019.

Nineteen weekly return-sailings will be added to three routes on the western channel: Roscoff to Plymouth, Cherbourg to Poole and Le Havre to Portsmouth. These additional rotations will allow more space for lorries, as requested by the Department for Transport. In total Brittany Ferries will realise a 50 per cent increase in freight capacity on the three affected routes from 29th March 2019, representing a 30 per cent increase overall  on the western Channel.

“Our priority is to prepare for a no-deal Brexit and to create additional capacity,” said Christophe Mathieu Brittany Ferries CEO. “By increasing the number of rotations on routes like Le Havre – Portsmouth we will be able to meet the Department for Transport’s Brexit requirement. We will also work hard to minimise the impact on existing Brittany Ferries freight customers and passengers, although there may be some changes to some sailing times, for which we apologise in advance.”

Brittany Ferries operates 12 ships and 11 routes, linking the UK with France, the UK with Spain, France with Ireland and Ireland with Spain. It carries around 2.5 million passengers every year, 85 percent of whom are British, as well as around 210,000 freight units.

The company was born on 2 January 1973, the day after the UK joined the EEC (forerunner to EU). The first sailing carried market garden produce grown by Breton farmers seeking new markets across the Channel. From these humble beginnings, Brittany Ferries quickly became a tour operator, adding routes linking the UK to Spain in 1978.

In the last year, the company has confirmed a €450 m investment in fleet renewal. Three new ships will be delivered post-Brexit. The first vessel, called Honfleur, will be the first ferry powered by LNG (liquefied natural gas) to sail on the English Channel. She enters service in summer 2019 and will operate on the company’s busiest route between Portsmouth and Caen.

End

 

Surprised that no additional tonnage mentioned.

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Yes - there will certainly be a requirement for an extra ship at Roscoff and Le Havre. Barfleur will be able to deal with the extra Cherbourg traffic.  Simplest option at Le Havre will be to retain Etretat, if that is an option - though a different ship will be preferable.  I wonder if we might see Bretagne transferred to Roscoff and Oscar Wilde brought in to St Malo?

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4 minutes ago, Gareth said:

Oscar Wilde

Chris mentioned a rumour relating to her last week so maybe that's what's happening.

This is what he said:

'I have no concrete news that the Oscar Wilde has been sold, and although we're delivering to her on Thurdsay I'm sure the crew wouldn't know either because the company are keeping things extremely close to their chests at the moment. I still can't see IF willingly give up 30 lucrative slots into Roscoff so if it's not from Rosslare we could think out of the box and consider another port(s). I have my own ideas on this but can't say anything just yet.'

So maybe they have chartered (or bought) her. 

Ed. 

Edited by Cabin-boy

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