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Sister ships, definition..

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The Steam Packet side loader car ferries are good examples of near sisters. The 1972 built Mona's Queen and 1976 Lady of Mann were near sisters but slightly different in terms of number of forward windows and other minor differences on the aft of the boat deck by the stern exhaust uptake structure. Also Lady had steel plating floors inside and the Queen wooden floors. Infact the Lady was also something like 30 cm shorter than the Queen!!! Ben my Chree and Manx Maid also looked identical but weren't. Different set up in the forward superstructure. These were ships of my childhood and I know them very well! 

Edited by Nick Hyde
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I was allowed to “steer” Mona’s Queen on a bridge visit when I was what must have been about 5 years’ old.

To the best of my knowledge, when they let me take the wheel when the ship was on a straight line course at sea, I believed I was actually steering her.  It has occurred to me since that the wheel may have been disengaged, but then again I am not sure that the ship was fitted with an autopilot when she was new, so it might have been legit.  I’ll probably never know!

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On 06/12/2018 at 08:22, Khaines said:

 So, smacking someone over the head with a frying pan on Edinburgh Castle, yep, I can believe it possibly true..🙂

Not as bad as shoving a passenger through the porthole! Happened on the Durban Castle. An 8 year old me and family were on the ship just after the trial. My mother told me later that the atmosphere was a bit tense among the stewards.

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12 minutes ago, BobCrox said:

Not as bad as shoving a passenger through the porthole! Happened on the Durban Castle. An 8 year old me and family were on the ship just after the trial. My mother told me later that the atmosphere was a bit tense among the stewards.

I am surprised David never got shoved through a porthole, very disagreeable man to work with apparently.  Can imagine being cooped up with him at sea and having to put up with his moods in such a confined space would have tested a lot of people’s patience.  I got fed up with him, he used to come in and tell us all about his, ahem, his daily bowel and toilet activity, every morning while people were eating.  Tell him to change the subject and he reared up. Or discussing very intimate personal stuff about his marital life.  I got fed up with telling him we don’t need to know that thanks, Dave, and off he’d go.  So being cooped up with him at sea, crikey.  I could just not have breakfast with that crowd any longer, it went over their heads but it irritated me to high heaven.  

I suppose it is extremely difficult at sea when people work in close confinement and there is one person that tips people over the edge in what can be a very stressful environment.  

I still see David about, I just dive in a shop and hide if I see him coming towards me...😄

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2 hours ago, Nick Hyde said:

Good on you being able to steer Mona's Queen as a child. I loved that ship and sailed on her many a time.

Me also - yes a lovely ship - 

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On 06/12/2018 at 22:29, Gareth said:

At the time of their conversion they became Fantasia and Fiesta.  (I have a vague recollection they even swapped names during this process for some reason).  Fiesta subsequently became Cezanne for SeaFrance, but that didn’t stop them being sisters.

That is correct, they swapped names - Fiesta the freighter went in for rebuild and came out as Fantasia. It was in the naval architect’s book that Ferry Publications produced. The reason was that “Fantasia” sounds like a pretty seedy word in French, although that didn’t stop Sealink UK calling her that or MSC one of their cruise ships.

Unlike the Anglo pronunciation of “fan-tay-ze-ha” or “fant-asia”, the more continental pronounciation is “fan-ta-see-ah”.

Incidentally at the time, Sealink British Ferries was going through an F naming policy after the run of Saints, the third ship introduced at the time with Fantasia and Fiesta was of course Felicity... which was going to be called Fandango!

Definitely a name that would have not simply got a prefix in the takeover; imaging Stena Fandango (shudder).

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1 hour ago, Seashore said:

Incidentally at the time, Sealink British Ferries was going through an F naming policy after the run of Saints, the third ship introduced at the time with Fantasia and Fiesta was of course Felicity... which was going to be called Fandango! 

And Felicity was... the name of the cat of someone who wrote in suggesting it (without checking the edition of Linkspan this was mentioned in I want to believe that the lady was moved to write in protest at the idea of Fandango).

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Just now, Gunwharf said:

What about Stena Adventurer and Stena Brittanica II. Weren't they sisters?

They were, as built.  Then Britannica was re-built....

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Yes Gareth but Britannica was lengthened several years after entering service. Until that point I believe they were identical.

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18 minutes ago, Gunwharf said:

Yes Gareth but Britannica was lengthened several years after entering service. Until that point I believe they were identical.

They were identical as delivered but the '03 Britannica must set a record, even for Stena, for the speed with which her original on board arrangements were changed. Because Stena RoRo had pinned the yard down so much on price the contract specified that they weren't able to change anything to the spec of fitout after the order was placed. After being ordered the ship was allocated to Stena Line BV for Harwich and they had their own ideas. So the yard completed her as agreed and on the delivery voyage workmen set about ripping her apart as part of a USD2m pre-service refit.

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1 hour ago, hhvferry said:

And Felicity was... the name of the cat of someone who wrote in suggesting it (without checking the edition of Linkspan this was mentioned in I want to believe that the lady was moved to write in protest at the idea of Fandango).

This is what I was thinking of, actually from Sealink OnLine edition 1 in 1991 -

image.png.eef74d4942f802a2d2b8132719e6bce3.png

Keeping it on topic, here's another picture of the Felicity and her sister in Durres this summer.

IMG_9835_1a.JPG

 

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It always seemed to me that Felicity was on the wrong route back in the early 90s, having done both Fishguard-Rosslare and Southampton-Cherbourg it was as if they were the wrong way around. There’s probably some reason for it (and of course Stena Normandy was better than anything else on the Western Channel for a few years until Normandie arrived, Bretagne being on the Spain run), but with more cabins, more reclining seats in an observation lounge and pretty nicely fitted out, just seemed better for a longer run than Normandy which felt then still like it was a day ferry. Of course, Normandy’s sister runs the route today in very much that day ferry configuration.

Stena Felicity would have, in my clouded recollection, have been a better match to compete with Normandie and things might have been different. Then again, perhaps not, the Olau twins came along and top trumped everything.

I remember too back in 2003 when Stena planned to move the then Stena Britannica to Oslo as Stena Saga (still is), they were going to swap Stena Normandy back to Harwich and put Stena Europe at Southampton. Clearly the nonsense of repainting Normandy out of Stena Sealink into Stena livery, and Europe out of Stena and into Stena Sealink livery, prevailed along with the upheaval of changing ships on not one but two routes.

Edited by Seashore

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