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Gareth

Russian Cargo Ship Aground in Cornwall

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Maybe the crew were hoping to visit the wonderful, world-famous town of Falmouth, after their friends suggested they see Pendenis castle in the middle of winter, with an optional excursion to Truro cathedral. Ed. 

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It is being reported in Falmouth that the Dutch found so many faults and safety defects with that ship that they detained it  for 71 days and only recently released it. I wonder whether the authorities in Falmouth will inspect and detain it too -  or be glad to see it on its way. 

 

 

Edited by wortley

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On 18/12/2018 at 20:45, Cabin-boy said:

Maybe the crew were hoping to visit the wonderful, world-famous town of Falmouth, after their friends suggested they see Pendenis castle in the middle of winter, with an optional excursion to Truro cathedral. Ed. 

Well Falmouth to Salisbury in as day by train would be a tad tricky, so have to settle for local attractions! 

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Without prejudice, let’s summarise the facts:

1.  The vessel was anchored, without cargo, off the coast of the UK after a long period of detention by the Dutch authorities (a country where Russian spies have recently been intercepted trying to infiltrate the European investigations into Salisbury).

2. UK immigration authorities have made it much harder for Russian nationals to enter the country by conventional means.

3. Russian espionage ability has been severely hampered in the UK since diplomatic sanctions in the aftermath of Salisbury.

4. On the night of the grounding, the ship was anchored in a position to give shelter from the prevailing south-westerly storm that was raging at the time.

5. In spite of this, when the anchor failed to hold, she seems to have drifted ashore in a NNW direction - almost at 90 degrees to the prevailing winds.

6. During the course of the grounding, Marine Traffic tracks show that she made progress in and out, towards the shore and away from it, numerous times before the final grounding.  (If anyone can think of any explanation for the progress to seaward elements that doesn't require the ships engines to have been active I'd be interested to know).

7. The ship finally grounded, on a generally very inhospitable coastline, on a smooth sandy beach that was "almost" within walking distance of the ship (for anyone that might have wanted to "get off").

8. After the event, the Russians went to extraordinarily defensive lengths to criticise the "safety of the sea area" and to blame the UK for the grounding.  (Defensive...or diversionary?)

The above is a summary of the objective facts.

What they may logically point to is something I'll leave you to evaluate youself 😏....

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16 hours ago, Gareth said:

Without prejudice, let’s summarise the facts:

1.  The vessel was anchored, without cargo, off the coast of the UK after a long period of detention by the Dutch authorities (a country where Russian spies have recently been intercepted trying to infiltrate the European investigations into Salisbury).

2. UK immigration authorities have made it much harder for Russian nationals to enter the country by conventional means.

3. Russian espionage ability has been severely hampered in the UK since diplomatic sanctions in the aftermath of Salisbury.

4. On the night of the grounding, the ship was anchored in a position to give shelter from the prevailing south-westerly storm that was raging at the time.

5. In spite of this, when the anchor failed to hold, she seems to have drifted ashore in a NNW direction - almost at 90 degrees to the prevailing winds.

6. During the course of the grounding, Marine Traffic tracks show that she made progress in and out, towards the shore and away from it, numerous times before the final grounding.  (If anyone can think of any explanation for the progress to seaward elements that doesn't require the ships engines to have been active I'd be interested to know).

7. The ship finally grounded, on a generally very inhospitable coastline, on a smooth sandy beach that was "almost" within walking distance of the ship (for anyone that might have wanted to "get off").

8. After the event, the Russians went to extraordinarily defensive lengths to criticise the "safety of the sea area" and to blame the UK for the grounding.  (Defensive...or diversionary?)

The above is a summary of the objective facts.

What they may logically point to is something I'll leave you to evaluate youself 😏....

Nothing would surprise me these days!

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2 minutes ago, wortley said:

And as of now she is still anchored in Falmouth bay, going nowhere.

How irresponsible, anchoring again in a sea area that is so unsafe! 😉

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It seems weird to me about this incident and others beacause on 25th of December 2018 a Russian flagged vessel nearly capsized 

now having this incident with both of them being near military importance areas something is up in my opinion

Edited by Aiden

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14 hours ago, Aiden said:

It seems weird to me about this incident and others beacause on 25th of December 2018 a Russian flagged vessel nearly capsized 

now having this incident with both of them being near military importance areas something is up in my opinion

What time and where is that happening tomorrow then !

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23 hours ago, wortley said:

And as of now she is still anchored in Falmouth bay, going nowhere.

Leaking.  Detained and ordered not to leave by Maritime and Coastguard Agency until repairs are completed.

I hope someone is sending food out for the poor crew members.

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Still anchored at Falmouth but in the river mouth now - local branch of Mission to Seamen expressing concern and reported to have sent out some biscuits and chocolates (Russian Orthodox Christmas today) and four fishing rods for the crew "to entertain themselves and for them to catch their own food."  Poor devils. 

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Many faults, detained, moored in Carrick Roads for the last three months, many unpaid bills, arrested, now sold at auction by order of the Admiralty court.  Who to ? Going away soon?

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The MAIB report for this has been published.

 

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/media/5d402009e5274a401464760b/2019_-_11_-_Kuzma_Minin.pdf

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