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BF Confirms Fourth New Ferry (Third E-Flexer)


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Galica was floated out of the shipyard today, with construction of the Salamanca officially commencing with the first steel cutting.

Photos thanks to AVIC SHIPYARD

Not necessarily - I am pained to liken things to the airline industry, but take the different experience airlines offer essentially on the same planes. In an age where travel is a commodity and not a

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4 hours ago, Jim said:

We suffered the Pont L'Abbe - we can cope with this...

The Pont L was designed like that, the Pont A was forced to wear a big top hat, that's the difference.

I imagine the small funnel on E-flexers is for wind resistance primarily?  

Is there a certain height that a funnel has to be from the waterline, or from the deck (passengers)? Would this be different on modern lower-polluting vessels, or unrelated?

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2 hours ago, hf_uk said:

Is there a certain height that a funnel has to be from the waterline, or from the deck (passengers)? Would this be different on modern lower-polluting vessels, or unrelated?

The smaller they are the more they effect the aerodynamics as it's about air flow over the superstructure. It's been an issue since the 1940's when smaller more raked stacks were first used due to a switch to oil fired power-the need to keep soot of passengers diminished. The older cylindrical type seen on the liners of the early 20th century were actually less of a problem.

Have another look at the images of Moby Wonder and Aki then at their sister Tallinks ex Superstar now Corsica's Pascal Lota. The funnel on the latter is built the opposite way.

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The older cylindrical type seen on the liners of the early 20th century were actually less of a problem.

They did have some problems, Cunard's 1947 Caronia had a huge funnel which acted as a sail and caused problems with docking in high winds.The Orlent Lines Oriana had a superstructure which swept up from fore and aft to the central funnel and bridge. This was deliberate in an effort to balance windage on the upperworks.

I think the big difference between today's vessels and their traditional predecessors is that modern vessels have much more of their profile above the waterline whereas the older ships were more deep draughted and sat in the water rather than on it which offered a lot more resistance to the wind effect on the upperworks.

Edited by cvabishop
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A lot of people moan about crap on their car when it's outside. I just wondered, if a taller funnel would essentially mean less stuff dropping down before it passed the stern of the ship and into the wash. Presumably of course, this must be affected by speed too. If you are on a quicker route then there would be less than a slower one...

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22 hours ago, hf_uk said:

A lot of people moan about crap on their car when it's outside. I just wondered, if a taller funnel would essentially mean less stuff dropping down before it passed the stern of the ship and into the wash. Presumably of course, this must be affected by speed too. If you are on a quicker route then there would be less than a slower one...

Going off topic slightly, a colossal amount of research went into the design of the Bretagne's funnel, to ensure that fumes would not enter the passenger decks, or intakes, whatever the weather conditions. Whether or not the same attention to detail is given to all ships today is open to debate...

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4 minutes ago, Andy said:

Going off topic slightly, a colossal amount of research went into the design of the Bretagne's funnel, to ensure that fumes would not enter the passenger decks, or intakes, whatever the weather conditions. Whether or not the same attention to detail is given to all ships today is open to debate...

I wonder if removing the Cap's winglets has made a difference?

The longer less broad arrangement on Galicia still gives the boat boffins ample space to add all of the emission regs stuff but it also looks quite sleek and aerodynamic. Aesthetically I think it tops her off nicely. 

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Going off topic slightly, a colossal amount of research went into the design of the Bretagne's funnel, to ensure that fumes would not enter the passenger decks, or intakes, whatever the weather conditions. Whether or not the same attention to detail is given to all ships today is open to debate...

That has been a perennial problem ever since steamships were invented. It's very interesting to look at all the designs that have been tried over the years to initially stop smuts ruining passenger's clothes and besmirching the decks and latterly to stop fumes entering the accommodation spaces. The QM2 had to have a short funnel to get under the bridge into New York harbour so they developed the QE2 windscoop arrangement to throw the emissions skyward to contribute to global warming.

The liner France had prominent wings on her funnels just like the Superfasts to disperse the boiler exhausts. (motor exhausts for the Superfasts). The German liners Bremen and Europa in the 1930s initially had very low fashionable funnels which dumped gobbets of unburnt oil over the decks and passengers and which had to be subsequently raised.

Those of us who recall travelling on the old steam trains will recall the risks of sticking your head out of the window only to receive a smut in the eye. These days, the infrequent opportunities on the railways to do the same seem to result in decapitation.

Seems that some problems never go away completely.

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1 hour ago, rileyman said:

I think that another 10m on the bow would give it a much sleeker look.

The 7th & 8th eflexers will be 25.2m longer than the original design.

Interestingly the 9th (and currently the final eflexer on order, but with further options available to Stena RoRo) will be the Santona, which will revert to the original length. 

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I notice Galicia is registered in Portsmouth. I wonder if this is just a Stena RoRo thing until she is handed over or we'll actually be getting a British flagged member of the BF fleet. It is in BF font not some temporary stencil job.  

Having her with a British based crew would save the need for a weekly call in France for a crew change.

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1 hour ago, Timmy said:

I notice Galicia is registered in Portsmouth. I wonder if this is just a Stena RoRo thing until she is handed over or we'll actually be getting a British flagged member of the BF fleet. It is in BF font not some temporary stencil job.  

Having her with a British based crew would save the need for a weekly call in France for a crew change.

This has been addressed before on this thread. The British Flag is a temporary measure as all Stena RoRo ships are registered in the UK. When Brittany Ferries take delivery, she will be registered in France.

 

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On 10/09/2019 at 16:19, jonno said:

Steve, the other vessel in the image appears to have a different stern facing superstructure, do you know if this is due to the differing specs between the needs of Stena compared to BF?

Exactly that.  Brittany Ferries have a different layout on deck 7 as they have foregone the car deck that is there on the other units so they can get more cabins (note the portholes at the stern on GALICIA).  On the Stena ships car passengers will be able to walk straight from the car deck and into the public spaces without any stairs or lifts.

With regard to the port of registry, she's a Stena RoRo ship until delivered.  Though Portsmouth is a bit strange for them (perhaps instead of somewhere like London at BF's request for PR purposes?).

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  • 1 year later...

Been mentioned once or twice in other topics but did not want to steer them more off-topic,

I wonder when the route allocation for Santona will be revealed? 

Recent suggestions are certainly pointing towards a Pont-Aven replacement especially now there is proof that Santona will fit Plymouth and Roscoff. Whilst I am now inclined to agree, this surely cannot have been the original plan when ordered in 2018. Unless I am mistaken, until just before COVID, there were plans for a direct Bretagne replacement thereby implying PA would be staying on her current routes. It was therefore reasonable to assume that Santona would be a third vessel out of Portsmouth. 

So if Santona does indeed replace PA, why the change of plan? 

  • COVID reducing demand? 
  • The rail link plans? 
  • Something else?

Regardless, replacing PA with Santona would be quite a significant change for regular PA passengers but would at least mean a consistent offering between the UK and Spain. 

I would be interested to hear others thoughts on what I have mentioned

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26 minutes ago, georgem7 said:

Recent suggestions are certainly pointing towards a Pont-Aven replacement

Really?  Where have you seen that George?  I’m not aware of any indication of route deployment even for Salamanca, let alone Santona.  Everything I’ve seen has been assumption and enthusiast speculation.  (Including my own).

I suspect even BF will be retaining a flexible view of these things until nearer the time.

But, broadly, there are two or three theories put forward.  One is all three to Portsmouth, providing possibly daily sailings to and from Spain.

The others involve two Flexers at Portsmouth (for which there are a couple of different models for scheduling.  In one theory, the third Flexer goes to Rosslare.  And in the other, the third Flexer replaces PA, in line with the premise of your question.  That is the theory about which I have seen the least, but, yes, if it happens there would be two almost inevitable knock-on consequences.  One would be the replacement of Bretagne by PA at St Malo.  And the other would be the end of BF at Cork.

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18 minutes ago, Gareth said:

Really?  Where have you seen that George?  I’m not aware of any indication of route deployment even for Salamanca, let alone Santona.  Everything I’ve seen has been assumption and enthusiast speculation.  (Including my own).

I suspect even BF will be retaining a flexible view of these things until nearer the time.

But, broadly, there are two or three theories put forward.  One is all three to Portsmouth, providing possibly daily sailings to and from Spain.

The others involve two Flexers at Portsmouth (for which there are a couple of different models for scheduling.  In one theory, the third Flexer goes to Rosslare.  And in the other, the third Flexer replaces PA, in line with the premise of your question.  That is the theory about which I have seen the least, but, yes, if it happens there would be two almost inevitable knock-on consequences.  One would be the replacement of Bretagne by PA at St Malo.  And the other would be the end of BF at Cork.

Sorry Gareth, I should have used better words. Theory being a better word to use than suggestion. But I personally feel that PA replacement ‘theory’ has the strongest footing at this moment in time based on Galicia’s recent trials and the SOMABRET rumour from @jonno. These two factors weaken the case for the two other theories you have suggested. 

I apologise again for any confusion. I have simply restarted this discussion because I wanted to see others thoughts on:

  • When we are likely to find out (thank you for answering Gareth)
  • If she did replace PA, what changes would have resulted in this decision?

 

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35 minutes ago, Gareth said:

I’m not aware of any indication of route deployment even for Salamanca

Under 'Funnel Emissions' on this page, it says Salamanca will replace Cap Finistere. I posted this on the Galicia inauguration thread. Okay, I accept it's hardly an official confirmation, but I'm sure it was mentioned elsewhere too. 

https://www.brittany-ferries.co.uk/hola-galicia/technically-more-efficient

Edited by georgem7
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