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Cabin-boy

Estonia tragedy - 25th Anniversary

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This year is the 25th Anniversary of the sinking of the Estonia in the Baltic. According to the French press, survivors, representatives of those who died, and their families will today go to court in a Paris suburb to demand compensation from Bureau Veritas, the company whose job it was to inspect and certify the vessel and which is headquartered in France, and the ship's German builder. 

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.europe1.fr/international/25-ans-apres-le-naufrage-de-lestonia-rescapes-et-ayants-droit-demandent-reparation-en-france-3890351.amp&ved=2ahUKEwjA7p_Y9MnhAhWM2BQKHeGGAqcQFjAgegQIAxAB&usg=AOvVaw0A-m5uQ2gRIoF3hl8gTjpZ&ampcf=1

Ed

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It was a terrible tragedy that should never have happened...Poor souls..But begs the question though of why have they waited 25 years to go to court?? Something seems a bit odd.

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11 hours ago, Paully said:

It was a terrible tragedy that should never have happened...

An appropriate choice of words, agreed.

 

11 hours ago, Paully said:

Something seems a bit odd.

An apt description of the whole saga.

🤐

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I know Gareth has researched this particular tragedy extensively and is keeping his council, but I've had a quick look through the report referred to in the link and it appears the survivors and relatives of those on board received 130 million euro for material loss, and within quite a relatively short space of time. However having accepted this offer from Estline they signed an agreement ending any further recourse against the company, which is why they are not now appearing in court. 

As Ed points out Meyer-Werft who built the ship, and Bureau Veritas who certified it as safe are in the dock this time to the tune of 40.8 million euro for moral loss, ie the stress each and every crew member and passenger were put under in the minutes before their impending death.

Out of interest I came across this youtube link showing what is most likely to have happened - I found it fascinating, scary and very sad...

Chris

 

 

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Thanks for the additional info Chris. Looking at the video, it is indeed scary as you say. Luckily that type of failure is very rare, and lessons have been learned, although such drive-through designs do still seem to be the most popular. If all ferries were stern-door only, requiring trucks and cars to turn around inside either on loading or unloading (depending on the initial  loading position) how wide would ferries have to be to allow this? What is the required turning circle for standard HGVs so that reversing on is not necessary and doesn't prolong turnaround times? A second observation from watching the video is how useless lifeboats are in such situations, unless launched immediately, but which goes against the current idea that you are safer staying on board rather than evacuating the vessel. Once the ship is listing at anything over 20° to port or starboard it would seem very difficult to get the boats loaded and away. Why are we not seeing some sort of evacuation pods being used instead or a rail-launched lifeboat system as found on tankers and oil rigs? Is it for esthetic reasons, because the risk is so low or cost? I guess the impact with the sea tends to result in more injuries (broken bones and neck/back issues) but as long as they are survivable surely that's the key. Ed. 

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Just like Gareth I'm staying out of this one.

3 hours ago, Cabin-boy said:

If all ferries were stern-door only, requiring trucks and cars to turn around inside either on loading or unloading (depending on the initial  loading position) how wide would ferries have to be to allow this? What is the required turning circle for standard HGVs so that reversing on is not necessary and doesn't prolong turnaround times?

Ed both Pride of Hull & Pride of Rotterdam are stern only, about the same width as the Pont and about the same length as an e-Flexer with the advantage of having a shallower draft. You drive on and U turn at the bow through a space in the centre casing. both Etretat and BDS are stern only loaders too. 

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