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Club Voyage breakfast allowance


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Now, that's a proper croissant.  I like that style much more than the common, barely crescent shaped ones as you get nice crispy ends to bite into.

Just a pedantic point from a teacher on holiday, but one which might come in handy to someone: when making a compound noun (such as 'pain au chocolat') plural you always pluralise the first word (the

So having come on BFE for a quick afternoon read; I have had a French Lesson and the equivalent of the British debates on Scones. Wonderful.

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I haven't done that crossing but, assuming you are a Club Voyage member, if you look on your ticket under Onboard Services where it says you have an £8.50 allowance towards breakfast there will be a multiplication number eg on a single overnight crossing for 2 passengers it normally says x2 so you'll be able to work it out from that.

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15 hours ago, Cassie said:

Thank you so much. You’re right, I hadn’t noticed that bit and it does include 2 x 2 breakfasts. Fingers crossed it’s calm enough to eat them !

The allowance means that the full buffet breakfast in the Restaurant Du Port is complimentary with just a €2 addition if you add the Vitalité (cooked) option. It's academic on the Cap I know but recently we've found that we haven't been charged the extra when used in conjunction with a commodore cabin.

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The only problem is the 2nd breakfast on the Tuesday morning you have very little time to eat it,if you are a pet owner it is a bit of a dash and on top of that they are wanting you to vacate the cabin early.

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3 hours ago, nodwad said:

The only problem is the 2nd breakfast on the Tuesday morning you have very little time to eat it,if you are a pet owner it is a bit of a dash and on top of that they are wanting you to vacate the cabin early.

I agree, the 0745 arrival is anti social even if you're not a pet owner. Last time we did the early Tuesday arrival we were heading to Portugal, I was knackered by dinner time.

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4 hours ago, nodwad said:

The only problem is the 2nd breakfast on the Tuesday morning you have very little time to eat it,if you are a pet owner it is a bit of a dash and on top of that they are wanting you to vacate the cabin early.

Bung it in a tupperware box and eat it in the car :)

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2 hours ago, hf_uk said:

Bung it in a tupperware box and eat it in the car :)

For some reason it doesn't feel quite right doing that in the a la carte restaurant but I never have any qualms about taking a couple of pain au chocalates away from the self service to eat later.

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10 hours ago, Angel said:

I never have any qualms about taking a couple of pain au chocalates

Just a pedantic point from a teacher on holiday, but one which might come in handy to someone: when making a compound noun (such as 'pain au chocolat') plural you always pluralise the first word (the noun itself) rather than the added description (the adjective). So what you'd ask for in the bakery would be 'deux pains au chocolat, SVP' (but you don't actually pronounce the 's' so the only difference is the number). You want two of the pastries but not two types of chocolate. If there were two different chocolates then 'au' would become 'aux' as in something you might see in a restaurant: 'mousse aux deux chocolats'.

If you are creating a more traditional plural phrase then you pluralise both words, the noun and the adjective. So if you have one black cat you say 'Un chat noir' but if you have two of them then it's 'deux chats noirs'.

Enjoy your breakfast! I'm just off to the bakery to get some croissants and pains au chocolat and then plan to eat them while enjoying the rather pleasant view here over the bay on the eastern side of the Quiberon peninsula. 

Ed.

DSC_0643.JPG

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1 hour ago, Cabin-boy said:

Just a pedantic point from a teacher on holiday, but one which might come in handy to someone: when making a compound noun (such as 'pain au chocolat') plural you always pluralise the first word (the noun itself) rather than the added description (the adjective). So what you'd ask for in the bakery would be 'deux pains au chocolat, SVP' (but you don't actually pronounce the 's' so the only difference is the number). You want two of the pastries but not two types of chocolate. If there were two different chocolates then 'au' would become 'aux' as in something you might see in a restaurant: 'mousse aux deux chocolats'.

If you are creating a more traditional plural phrase then you pluralise both words, the noun and the adjective. So if you have one black cat you say 'Un chat noir' but if you have two of them then it's 'deux chats noirs'.

Enjoy your breakfast! I'm just off to the bakery to get some croissants and pains au chocolat and then plan to eat them while enjoying the rather pleasant view here over the bay on the eastern side of the Quiberon peninsula. 

Ed.

DSC_0643.JPG

There will be a test on this tomorrow...........

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Of course they aren’t called Pain au chocolat in a few regions of France because that’s “chocolate bread” and as a waitress in Saint Emilion told me “it’s not chocolate bread it’s a  chocolatine , of course the French have their own way of dealing with the issue.

 

 

 

 

Edited by neilcvx
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I have never understood the logic of going to the shops in the morning to buy breakfast. When in France we buy Croissants in boxes of 6 or 8 ( at less than half the price) from the supermarket. As long as they have a decent butter content, they last for days and reheat perfectly in the oven.

Edited by David Williams
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4 minutes ago, David Williams said:

I have never understood the logic of going to the shops in the morning to buy breakfast. When in France we buy Croissants in boxes of 6 or 8 ( at less than half the price) from the supermarket. As long as they have a decent butter content, they last for days and reheat perfectly in the oven.

Not a patch on the fresh ones.  We go to the boulangerie every day when we’re in France.

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I like going to the bakers or the campsite shop to buy a croissant  in the morning especially if it’s a good small family run  boulangerie they tend to be far superior to the shop bought ones I have tried the shop bought ones but it’s just not the same texture that you get from a fresh one from the village boulangerie.

 

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4 minutes ago, Cabin-boy said:

The real question, of course, is do you tear your croissant into chunks and add jam or honey etc to each piece? Or do you flatten it, top-side down, and then spread something on the base? I do the latter. Ed. 

I take a sharp knife to my hot croissant and split it on the rounded edge so that I have a flatter Croissant of half the depth, to that is added butter and Lidl mixed berry Jam (as we can't agree what flavour jam to buy)

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15 minutes ago, David Williams said:

Horses for courses, I generally find the bakery ones too dry and flaky (as well as twice the price). 

I couldnt agree more and certainly the supermarket bread is now far superior in variety, quality and price than the `same old` from the village shops

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