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Just now, Paully said:

I couldnt agree more and certainly the supermarket bread is now far superior in variety, quality and price than the `same old` from the village shops

Supermarket croissants tend, in our experience, to be very greasy but it is difficult to get the butter-flakiness balance right in the real bakeries too. As for supermarket bread, it ranges from very good to very bad, often within the same group and within a few miles. Our Super U is not great but go 5kms up the road and it's so much better and the pastries are great too. Ed. 

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Now, that's a proper croissant.  I like that style much more than the common, barely crescent shaped ones as you get nice crispy ends to bite into.

Just a pedantic point from a teacher on holiday, but one which might come in handy to someone: when making a compound noun (such as 'pain au chocolat') plural you always pluralise the first word (the

So having come on BFE for a quick afternoon read; I have had a French Lesson and the equivalent of the British debates on Scones. Wonderful.

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23 minutes ago, David Williams said:

I take a sharp knife to my hot croissant and split it on the rounded edge so that I have a flatter Croissant of half the depth, to that is added butter and Lidl mixed berry Jam (as we can't agree what flavour jam to buy)

Ohh! A third way. That's adventurous! 

This map shows the schism in French baking-doctrine which I guess is a little like our 'scon'/'scoane' debate. Ed

pain-au-chocolat-ou-chocolatine-ces-objets-du-quotidien-que-l-on-nomme-differemment-selon-les-regions-20171026-1550-32f849-0@1x.jpeg

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36 minutes ago, Cabin-boy said:

The real question, of course, is do you tear your croissant into chunks and add jam or honey etc to each piece? Or do you flatten it, top-side down, and then spread something on the base? I do the latter. Ed. 

I’ve always understood the “ correct” way to eat them was to dunk them in your bowl of milky coffee and bite off the wet bit. Always makes me a bit queasy to see it and an awful thing to do to coffee.

Churros dunked in hot thick chocolate however.....

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The village we go to in Brittany doesn’t have a supermarket and has 3 boulangeries it’s €1 for a croissant and not much more for a baguette 1 of them gets a delivery from Quimper every morning one is ok and the other does a really good selection of breads including this tasty treat.

 

 

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8 hours ago, Cabin-boy said:

Just a pedantic point from a teacher on holiday, but one which might come in handy to someone: when making a compound noun (such as 'pain au chocolat') plural you always pluralise the first word (the noun itself) rather than the added description (the adjective). So what you'd ask for in the bakery would be 'deux pains au chocolat, SVP' (but you don't actually pronounce the 's' so the only difference is the number). You want two of the pastries but not two types of chocolate. If there were two different chocolates then 'au' would become 'aux' as in something you might see in a restaurant: 'mousse aux deux chocolats'.

If you are creating a more traditional plural phrase then you pluralise both words, the noun and the adjective. So if you have one black cat you say 'Un chat noir' but if you have two of them then it's 'deux chats noirs'.

Enjoy your breakfast! I'm just off to the bakery to get some croissants and pains au chocolat and then plan to eat them while enjoying the rather pleasant view here over the bay on the eastern side of the Quiberon peninsula. 

Ed.

DSC_0643.JPG

 

3 hours ago, Cabin-boy said:

The real question, of course, is do you tear your croissant into chunks and add jam or honey etc to each piece? Or do you flatten it, top-side down, and then spread something on the base? I do the latter. Ed. 

So having come on BFE for a quick afternoon read; I have had a French Lesson and the equivalent of the British debates on Scones. Wonderful.

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Found by accident as our butter was solid so was melted as bit too well. Croissants dipped in re solidifying butter is a very tasty, neat and tidy way to eat them. I also do what Ed does and turn them over and butter the bottom side and maybe a little jam if the mood takes. From the self service I've also been known to squish two together with a slice of ham & cheese between them, wrap them in a napkin then head out on deck if the weather is fine on a morning departure. 

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We don't go to France, if we can help it.  We go to Spain.  Ok, so I'm being a "pain", but we prefer to buy in the local bakery rather than the supermarket.  In fact, we prefer to buy local whenever possible, even if it means paying as much as €4 for a 6 kilo bag of oranges.  In a small village in the Sierra Espuna of about 100 inhabitants there are 2 superb bakeries, five minutes from the campsite.  Heaven.  Pan ecologico!!

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Right, so this morning we tested the home-made brioche and it was very nice. Just enough air to make it light and fluffy inside but not so much that it fell apart when spreading it with jam. Plus the crust was lightly browned but easy to cut through without having to crush the loaf. 

Tomorrow I'm off early to Belle-Ile to continue a cycling tour started two years ago so there won't be a bread report I'm afraid but, just to be really radical, I might mention a ferry or two at some point during the day. 

Ed. 

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2 hours ago, Cabin-boy said:

Do you mean 'only when Bf drop you off there unexpectedly because one of their ships has a technical problem'? Ed 😉

Exactly so.  Nothing against France, lovely country, lovely people (as most are everywhere) and they know what food and wine is for.  But we like to sail direct to Spain rather than trail down or up through France, especially in December when the days are short and the weather unreliable.

Our first trip was cancelled due to weather so they took us to St Malo instead.  A couple of years later our ferry home (Etretat I think) was indisposed so we drove to Caen. This year (late Feb/early Mar) there were no return ferries from Spain that could take both our motorhome and our dog, so we booked via St Malo.  It was ok apart from the gridlock round Bordeaux and we found a nice little campsite in the small village of Surgeres and the weather was very warm.

We had a good meal on Pont Aven, some nice triangular rolls for breakfast (do they still do them?) and "borrowed" some croissants for lunch while the dog slept happily in the van downstairs.

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3 hours ago, Cabin-boy said:

Right, so this morning we tested the home-made brioche and it was very nice. Just enough air to make it light and fluffy inside but not so much that it fell apart when spreading it with jam. Plus the crust was lightly browned but easy to cut through without having to crush the loaf. 

Tomorrow I'm off early to Belle-Ile to continue a cycling tour started two years ago so there won't be a bread report I'm afraid but, just to be really radical, I might mention a ferry or two at some point during the day. 

Ed. 

Come on Ed, couldn't you could pack a little fresh bread and maybe cheese & ham... a robust paté perhaps, a review would be good and I'm sure there are those who'd appreciate your take on the wine you wash it down with. You'll stop for lunch?

Personally I think we get enough ferries, a lifestyle post or two would go down a treat. Maybe both you and @neilcvx could start a club called Breton buns of steel - boulangerie biking for the beginner, the bold and the brazen...? 

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2 hours ago, jonno said:

Breton buns of steel 

More like 'British balls of dough!'

I think Neil is a bit too keen for my liking. I'm the sort of cyclist who makes sure I start my trip at the northern tip of Belle Ile and cycles to the south in the hope that it's all downhill. Ed.

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3 hours ago, The Ferry Man said:

I always go to a nice Boulangerie in Cherbourg post cycle, called Maison Toulorge. Do a really nice brioche with chocolate chips! The Grande one is rather large!

IMG-20190616-WA0027.jpeg

I'm impressed with the finger nails... any tips to add to our new lifestyle thread, you know, moisturisers emery boards that type of thing? Mine look like I've been at them with a sanding block then coated in humbrol varnish... acrylic of course, I don't use enamels.

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5 hours ago, neilcvx said:

1779D52B-EBD0-4C3B-AFC1-6404FD4D53F4.thumb.jpeg.50681913120425dae1889d73749406ed.jpegB2931C36-F4E4-496C-9F36-6239267C5280.thumb.jpeg.e2f6095d7bf0772e6cff99fb60844396.jpeg

Thats my favourite Boulangerie and I did cycle there.

Now, that's a proper croissant.  I like that style much more than the common, barely crescent shaped ones as you get nice crispy ends to bite into.

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