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TonyMWeaver

Cruise Passengers Could Triple In Portsmouth

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CRUISE PASSENGERS COULD TRIPLE IN PORTSMOUTH AS MULTI-MILLION POUND EXTENSION GETS UNDERWAY

Portsmouth International Port is set to welcome 150,000 cruise passengers annually in the next few years, following the announcement construction firm Knights Brown will lead the multi-million pound project to increase the size of cruise ships the Port can manage.

From November the biggest cruise investment the city has seen gets underway, this involves complex engineering work to reconfigure the cruise berth, meaning once completed by spring next year the Port can handle ships up to 255m in length.

Mike Sellers, Portsmouth International Port's director said: "Portsmouth is in an enviable location for cruise, with world famous attractions and a dramatic waterfront, there are plenty of opportunities to grow the city's share of the market.

"More passengers will also drive demand for additional hotels, an increased spend in shops and restaurants, not to mention putting Portsmouth on the international map.

"With the recent arrival of the Normandy veterans aboard Fred Olsen's Boudicca, for D-Day 75 commemorations,  proves we have a high-profile position as a UK port. 

"This is the start of an incredibly exciting and bold plan for cruise, over the next few years there will be a remarkable difference in how Portsmouth is perceived as a leading competitor thanks to our experienced cruise experts who have recently joined the senior management team.

“A successful cruise and ferry port provides a wide benefit to the city including a significant contribution towards employment, increased sales for tourist attractions, not to mention an opportunity for residents in the surrounding Hampshire, Surrey, Sussex area to experience convenient travel abroad."

Increasing the length of ships the port can manage up to 255m opens up more of the cruise market for the city,  making the possibility of visits from the major lines such as Silversea, Crystal, Fred Olsen, Saga and CMV a regular occurrence. 

Ian Diaper, Portsmouth International Port's head of operations said: "Being in a position where we can accommodate the size of ships major lines have in their fleet, means we're in a great place to attract over 100 calls in the small, mid-size luxury and expedition cruise sector. 

"The cruise market is rapidly growing, with lines looking to diversify and attract a broader share of potential customers. Many cruise lines are also increasing their fleet with new vessels on order, so we have a real opportunity to accommodate demand. 

"Once the cruise berth extension is complete we'll then turn our attention to transforming the current terminal building in anticipation for an upsurge in passengers. We'll be looking to accommodate up to 2,000 cruise guests, which will mean additional check-in desks, security and lounge facilities, plus a baggage hall able to handle the passenger volumes expected. 

"Portsmouth has great advantages as a cruise port, the direct access to the motorway, the closest on the South coast to the main shipping channels, fantastic local attractions and a committed team with industry experience."

The current cruise berth has a sloped level making it particularly challenging for accessing certain ships, the essential levelling work and creation of an additional dolphin  - a fixed, permanent structure, separate to the berth, which acts as an extension for mooring - will mean ships up to 255m will be safely, and conveniently, handled at the Port. 

Anisa Koci, Portsmouth City Council's project manager said: "What appears to be a fairly straightforward engineering project is in fact incredibly complex.

"Managing construction within a marine environment is challenging, and combined with a busy port and frequent ship movements, means we've appointed Knights Brown who have experience in delivering major civil engineering projects.

"The work involves making structural alterations to the existing quay and developing options to extend,  all within a time frame that accommodates the scheduled cruise vessels."

The Port has seen a steady number of cruise calls, with  50 expected in 2019 resulting in 50,000 passengers. The aim is to grow to over 100 by 2022, delivering over 150,000 passengers.

Portsmouth's recent cruise calls have been Viking, Ponant, Noble Calendonia, Phoenix Reisen, Sea Cloud, Saga, Fred Olsen, Majestic FTI, CMV, Silversea, Hapag-Lloyd, Quark and Sea Cloud. 

 

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https://www.portsmouth-port.co.uk/news/cruise-passengers-could-triple-in-portsmouth-as-multi-million-pound-extensi?fbclid=IwAR1XfdOBMfJdjIsbLxngE715h6uBEN0urPaUQHtsiVob7mwjI86y2c5J9vI

Edited by TonyMWeaver
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What hasn't been quoted in that press release is the addition of an overhead walkway directly from the Passenger terminal to berth 2 with a new gangway installed.

This revedelopment of berth 2 and the ability of the PIP to cater for vessels upto 255m is great news but I wonder how many cruise calls would have to be denied by the port on the days when all five ro/ro berths are in use.

Those calls can easily be handled here in the Port of Southampton 😀

Edited by canberra97
Editing

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Indeed - if anything, the underlying context to all this is that use of PIP as a ferryport is way under-capacity.  I doubt berth 2 gets used by ferries more than 4 or 5 times a week, and berth 3 is only once or twice a day.

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42 minutes ago, Gareth said:

Indeed - if anything, the underlying context to all this is that use of PIP as a ferryport is way under-capacity.  I doubt berth 2 gets used by ferries more than 4 or 5 times a week, and berth 3 is only once or twice a day.

So is there realistically an opportunity for a competitor to BF?

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1 minute ago, nottingham said:

So is there realistically an opportunity for a competitor to BF?

Absolutely.  In terms of routes, probably to Cherbourg and Le Havre, as those are the Portsmouth routes where BF’s presence is only token.

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31 minutes ago, Gareth said:

Absolutely.  In terms of routes, probably to Cherbourg and Le Havre, as those are the Portsmouth routes where BF’s presence is only token.

But there's a reason why the presence is only token, although perhaps it applies more to Cherbourg.

 

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A cruise ship is going to want to stay on the berth all day if it's a port-call. If they are starting and ending the cruises in Portsmouth then I suppose a turnaround of perhaps 8 hours is feasible for the smaller ships. How is that likely to affect the other users of berth 2? Ed. 

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Personally I think BF having a foothold on Le Havre early doors is an advantage. The port has huge expansion plans and is already France' busiest and largest, I think I read somewhere that it's also overtaken the likes of Antwerp & Hamburg too. Would be unfair to assume that Le Havre would also favour a French carrier?

Could berth 2 also be earmarked for BF's E-Flexer use. At 214m being able to turn on to the berth further away from HMS Bristol maybe sensible?

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2 hours ago, canberra97 said:

I wonder how many cruise calls would have to be denied by the port on the days when all five ro/ro berths are in use.

All 5 berths being used normally only happens on Sundays during the summer.

I've only seen berth 2 used on Sunday's and Fridays with ferries, and when Heavy Lift ships come in.

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Berth 2 is used by CF on her Sunday visit, and often by Commodore Goodwill when on weekend layover.  I’m pretty sure it is also used by BDS on her twice-weekly visit to the port. As far as I am aware, that’s it - and that’s where my 4/5 times per week comes from.

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1 hour ago, jonno said:

Personally I think BF having a foothold on Le Havre early doors is an advantage. The port has huge expansion plans and is already France' busiest and largest, I think I read somewhere that it's also overtaken the likes of Antwerp & Hamburg too. Would be unfair to assume that Le Havre would also favour a French carrier?

Could berth 2 also be earmarked for BF's E-Flexer use. At 214m being able to turn on to the berth further away from HMS Bristol maybe sensible?

Le Havre is France's largest and busiest port but in no way is it Europe's busiest. The port's of Antwerp and Hamburg are far bigger and far busier in terms of tonnage of cargo handled than Le Havre regardless of where you have supposed to have read it.

The busiest and biggest port's in Europe are.

Number 1) Rotterdam

Number 2) Antwerp

Number 3) Hamburg

Le Havre ranks at Number 11 and there is quite a difference between the tonnage of cargo handled at Antwerp and the size of the port compared to the Port of Le Havre.

 

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22 minutes ago, TonyMWeaver said:

'Baie de Seine' is on Berth 3 tonight but she comes in 3 times a week, Monday, Thursday and Saturday.

Must be that Etretat will go in on 2 then.

Yes, I’d forgotten about the Le Havre call, was just thinking in terms of the Bilbao departures.  Senior moment.  You’re right, 3 calls per week.  Only the Thursday call does not involve her lying overnight on the berth, and it used to be that when she did that she sat on berth 2.  If BDS is on 3 then Etretat will have to use 2.

Either way, the count of usage for the week is the same.

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Not sure about Etretat at the moment, she doesn't come in when 'Baie de Seine ' comes in as she does 3 lunchtime visits with 'Mont St Michel', Monday, Thursday and Saturday too, arriving at 13:30. As far as I know, she also uses Berth 3 on these visits, she did this afternoon.

Edited by TonyMWeaver

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Ah, is she still on her revised timetable?  If so that would explain it.  If BDS and Etretat are not in port at the same time then there is no need for berth 2 for them.  That may even have implications for CF’s Sunday call, if it does not coincide with Etretat?

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On the seemingly odd occasion which happened to be coincidentally the two times I went on Bretagne on a Sunday night ever, she has been on Berth 3 and Cap Finistere has been on Berth 4. I guessing that when it happened, Mont St Michel would have been on Berth 3 and Etretat on Berth 2. 

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2 hours ago, canberra97 said:

Le Havre is France's largest and busiest port but in no way is it Europe's busiest. The port's of Antwerp and Hamburg are far bigger and far busier in terms of tonnage of cargo handled than Le Havre regardless of where you have supposed to have read it.

The busiest and biggest port's in Europe are.

Number 1) Rotterdam

Number 2) Antwerp

Number 3) Hamburg

Le Havre ranks at Number 11 and there is quite a difference between the tonnage of cargo handled at Antwerp and the size of the port compared to the Port of Le Havre.

 

I don't believe I typed that the port was Europe's busiest... Also, I either read or I don't, there's no supposition involved. 

Having re-read the HAROPA  press releases, you're right their plan is to overtake both Antwerp & Hamburg, the two which are seeing a downturn since 2014, Hamburg especially due to the environmental issues they face.

According to the European Sea Ports Organisation, HAROPA-Port of Le Havre is Europe's 5th largest port complex and is ranked third for traffic between Asia & Europe. This was back in 2014.

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3 hours ago, Cabin-boy said:

Do you know where Le Havre ranks in terms of crude oil and petrochemical imports? Ed. 

 As of the 2012 EU directive, the oil trade is becoming a "decreasing environment". The oil is still a strategic part of the port but now they're concentrating on bio diesel, LNG and other bio fuels. They're also building specific bunkering terminals along the Seine and around the bay. This is being funded by the EU through the TEN-T initiative, SAFE-SECA.

French oil needs are falling... Interestingly, off topic I know but for the first 5 months of 2019 the UK produced more power for the country from renewables than it did from fossil fuels. 

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4 hours ago, Gareth said:

Berth 2 is used by CF on her Sunday visit, and often by Commodore Goodwill when on weekend layover.  I’m pretty sure it is also used by BDS on her twice-weekly visit to the port. As far as I am aware, that’s it - and that’s where my 4/5 times per week comes from.

When we've arrived on BDS from Le Havre or Spain, she's always berthed on No 3. The only ships I can remember which used it was the P&O's back in the '90's. There's a good image on PIP's port plan info of one of them on it... It's a later one as the hull is all white.

images.jpg.2c2aa7e0cb290ea6e54d20de4a08e1e4.jpg

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