Jump to content

Recommended Posts

We had a really nice crossing on the Pont Aven from Cork to Roscoff at the end of June. Check in was really quick and we were the second car on, that gave us 2 hours to get a good seat and just settle for a while before departure, which was 30 mins late, yet still arrived on time, and with only 3 engines .... love it.

I thought the ship looked really well, despite reading a few negative comments just before we sailed, our cabin was clean and tidy and everywhere around the ship looked really clean and well maintained.

We were treated to a show from a school of whales about 4 hours out to sea which seemed to be following us, very impressive indeed with the water spouts and their acrobatics, it drew quite an audience.

This is a photo of two of my daughters enjoying some whale watching. All in all it was a lovely outward leg and the least said about the return, the better, nothing wrong with the ship or the staff, just the weather ... sick bag city !!

Pont Aven.jpg

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can’t wait to sail on her again, although there’s nothing worse than a rough crossing if you’re prone to sea sickness.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Glad you enjoyed your trip after all the worrying in the buildup!  Always found the Pont to be a bit “uncomfortable” in less then perfect seas!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Went to the cabin about 11pm .. was starting to get a bit rough and all the kids were running round with sick bags and being hurried off to bed .. it got bad about 2am cos it woke up ... I am ok as long as I am lying down, but don't ask me to get up and walk about.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you find the Pont Aven uncomfortable in rough weather, don't book the Connemara. We're good sailors so no sickness but the regular big bangs with each wave meant sleep was difficult.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, BigDW1946 said:

If you find the Pont Aven uncomfortable in rough weather, don't book the Connemara. We're good sailors so no sickness but the regular big bangs with each wave meant sleep was difficult.

BigDW ...I am a terrible sailor and hate rough seas ... it's a means to an end for me so the sooner I arrive the better, so I don't think the Connemara would suit my needs ..... having said that, when it's calm I enjoy a meal and a drink and a wander around like everyone else.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Geezer, ever tried SeaBands; these wrist bands have a tiny plastic stud that is positioned over an acupuncture point on the wrist. I'm a good sailor but was given a complimentary pairs on a sponsored Beaujolais Run. My daughter tried them on one of her trips and swears they work. I think Boots and others sell them. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, BigDW1946 said:

Geezer, ever tried SeaBands; these wrist bands have a tiny plastic stud that is positioned over an acupuncture point on the wrist. I'm a good sailor but was given a complimentary pairs on a sponsored Beaujolais Run. My daughter tried them on one of her trips and swears they work. I think Boots and others sell them. 

What abut trying the two strips of sticking plaster placed over the belly button in a cross formation?  I've heard several people say it works. Ed. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, BigDW1946 said:

Geezer, ever tried SeaBands; these wrist bands have a tiny plastic stud that is positioned over an acupuncture point on the wrist. I'm a good sailor but was given a complimentary pairs on a sponsored Beaujolais Run. My daughter tried them on one of her trips and swears they work. I think Boots and others sell them. 

I’ve often worn these. I have my doubts as to whether they work, but if you’re as bad a sailor as I am you try anything. The problem is of course that you can’t tell how awful you would have felt if you hadn’t been wearing them.

i still need to follow the usual strategies of lying in a darkened cabin dosed up with Stugeron, or sitting on a windy deck trying to watch the horizon.

i have friends with greater intestinal fortitude who tell me mal de mer is all in the mind, which is of course a great help.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

i have friends with greater intestinal fortitude who tell me mal de mer is all in the mind, which is of course a great help

I think that is rubbish, given the right circumstances just about anyone can be affected although some are more resistant than others. I have always been a good sailor and never actually been seasick but trying to untangle a jammed genoa line on the foredeck of my old 25 ft yacht in a steep chop brought me very close once.

I also once felt queasy on the HSS from Harwich to Holland, it had an unnatural jerky motion which was quite unsettling. I think this can apply to other catamaran craft too.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anyone can be affected given the right circumstances and not just at sea. The closest I have ever been was on a Metropoltan Line train sitting sideways on what must have been a very rough unit ready for shopping. . It was so unsettling I had to get off. 

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
41 minutes ago, Millsy said:

Anyone can be affected given the right circumstances and not just at sea. The closest I have ever been was on a Metropoltan Line train sitting sideways on what must have been a very rough unit ready for shopping. . It was so unsettling I had to get off. 

With the tube I find it's the heat & humidity more than anything. It's the Circle Line for me, now I head the long way around to St James Park to enjoy the fresh air from the above ground stations. On ships I've felt queasy from time to time but never excessively, Mrs J has been a good sailor during 27 years together but she still loves the sea, she swears by Dramamine which you can only get mail order in the UK now or wait until you're in France or Spain and buy it in a pharmacy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
35 minutes ago, Gareth said:

I discovered recently that the Circle Line is no longer a closed circle! (Sorry, totally off-topic!).

I should have typed that HJ hasn't been a good sailor, her brother is even worse which considering their families maritime connections seems a bit strange to me.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, BigDW1946 said:

Geezer, ever tried SeaBands; these wrist bands have a tiny plastic stud that is positioned over an acupuncture point on the wrist. I'm a good sailor but was given a complimentary pairs on a sponsored Beaujolais Run. My daughter tried them on one of her trips and swears they work. I think Boots and others sell them. 

My wife uses them on sea journeys, buses and anywhere she might get motion sickness, to which she is prone. She no longer has a problem since using SeaBands. More anecdotal evidence...

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stugeron has been the life-saver for us. It’s the difference between Chunnel and long drive or ferry.  We’re neither of us any good with mind-over-matter sea sickness solutions so pills it has to be. 

The first time we took it, several hours into a ghastly crossing, my OH went from groaning feebly from his bed to the restaurant and eating lamb tagine. 

Now, unless the sea is flat calm, taking it is as automatic as checking in at Portsmouth.

Magic stuff and, with us anyway, absolutely no side effects.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can’t give any first hand advice about overcoming seasickness, as I don’t appear to suffer from it.  (Like Colin, there was one instance on a yacht in the middle of the night in very rolly conditions when I came up on watch where it came close, but it was just a single passing wretch). But my wife does, and she swears by Stugeron.  She says you have to take it an hour or two before it needs to take effect.  The other piece of “second hand” advice is the importance of making sure you can see the horizon.  Apparently the brain copes much better with choppy conditions if it has a reference point regarding which way is up, and sight of the horizon does that.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Gareth said:

I can’t give any first hand advice about overcoming seasickness, as I don’t appear to suffer from it.  (Like Colin, there was one instance on a yacht in the middle of the night in very rolly conditions when I came up on watch where it came close, but it was just a single passing wretch). But my wife does, and she swears by Stugeron.  She says you have to take it an hour or two before it needs to take effect.  The other piece of “second hand” advice is the importance of making sure you can see the horizon.  Apparently the brain copes much better with choppy conditions if it has a reference point regarding which way is up, and sight of the horizon does that.

The horizon advice is exactly the same as for kids suffering from car sickness. Stop reading,  watching films or playing games and look out of the windows to understand why your body is rolling from side to side and up and down. 

I tried the banana-two-hours-before-sailing technique on Cabin-girl and the Cabin-kids two years a couple of years ago before one of the roughest sailings I've ever been on between Newhaven-Dieppe in December. Their stomachs were empty otherwise and none of them had the slightest problem. The issue with ships like NEX in particular (much as I love her) is the enclosed environment and the contagion once one person starts suffering. 

Ed. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I suffered when younger but several years fishing cured me.  I always advise make sure you eat, sensible things, and get outside in the sea air, not easy when they close the outside decks in bad weather I often wonder why they don't open one section where it's sheltered and have a crew member there if necessary. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you are going to take any sea sickness tablets then it might be a good idea to try taking a couple some days before you intend to travel. Stugeron don’t have any side effects on us (and, when first we took them in the middle of a stormy Bay of Biscay I would have been quite happy for the side effects to have incuded total oblivion) but the leaflet says they cause drowsiness in some people. Boarding via the steep ramp when feeling dopey is not a good idea so best try well beforehand.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Medical leaflets always say all medicines cause drowsiness!  Having said that, in the case of Stugeron it can be true.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Best cure personally, was the seats on the engine control panel, on the 12 to 4 watch. A heady mixture of diesel and lube oil fumes together with a clattering deafening noise from the main engine (days before ear muffs were used). Engine room being right aft went up and down like a lift on any sea from a heavy swell upwards..If you were looking `peaky` you got send down the back to check on the prop tunnel glands, where you had to time your ups and downs correctly. Did`nt have time to think about being sick...Happy days though😁

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Gareth said:

Medical leaflets always say all medicines cause drowsiness!  Having said that, in the case of Stugeron it can be true.

The horizon is a good tip Gareth. Dramamine is the same for drowsiness, they're sedating antihistamines.

I agree with @Solo and Ed, eat something simple to put a lining on your stomach, a bread roll and a bit of cheese perhaps, in the self swervice (intended) don't go for the entrecot and a sauce, ratatouille & dauphinoise thinking you have a cast iron stomach.

I've found that standing on the back of NEX you can also be hit with exhaust and diesel fumes which adds to the cocktail.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've only ever felt queasy on one ship - Quiberon, every time as she approached the English coast - my kids nick-named her the 'Rocking Horse'.  I used to dose the kids with a chewy tablet thing that seemed to work before sailing, always a bit embarrassed in the chemists asking for a packet of 'Joyrides'!

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...