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Drinking on ferries.

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Following the discussion on the incident at Poole, it was mentioned perhaps they'd had a drink on board.

What is peoples attitude to drinking on the ferry before driving?

Personally I always travel Roscoff/Plymouth, so a 6hr plus crossing, I will have a couple of pints after boarding and then only soft drinks for the rest of the crossing and of course a meal on board as well, so no empty stomach.  Just thought do others do the same or not drink at all?

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I personally don’t drink at all on the ferry unless it’s an overnight crossing and even then it’s usually just a half bottle of red at most , the drink driving limit in Scotland is a lot lower than Scotland than England so it’s just habit not to drink at all and drive.

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I should have said one of the worse ones was going over Friday afternoons, when it ran, with our bikes. At least we were able to keep the bikes upright but good job we weren't breathalysed.

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I don’t drink anyway, to be honest, living in the centre of Bournemouth and seeing all the drunken behaviour that goes on all night and the people that start arguments in Wetherspoons because they get told alcohol is not served until 09.00.  Someone asked for a beer at 08.20 and got aggressive when he was refused.  Ferries, been followed by drunken revellers at Poole to the taxi.  Group of men who had been boozing all day on a day trip.  They were drinking heavily on the way out, very loud and one kept pestering me.  Tried to ignore him, but the rest joined in with being lairy.  I sat the other end of Barf on the way home as they were steaming drunk on the return journey, but just carried on drinking more and more.  Disembarking the one pestering me tried to get me to let him come home with me, he carried on right through customs and right out to the taxi rank.  Luckily there was a taxi there which I got in so I was safe, but for goodness sake, if there hadn’t been anything waiting...   I told him to eff off at the last moment along with a few more choice words and we drove off.   The way the British treat drink has really turned me teetotal.

Why do groups of men (and even women) have to get so steaming drunk.  Women are just as bad as men nowadays.  I had trouble a few weeks ago with a drunken woman who’d erroneously knocked on my door while looking for another flat in my block and tried to force her way in.  And punched me when I pushed her back out. I overpowered her easily despite her punching me, and the police are involved.  So really I have had drunks up to here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Khaines
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15 minutes ago, Khaines said:

I don’t drink anyway, to be honest, living in the centre of Bournemouth and seeing all the drunken behaviour that goes on all night and the people that start arguments in Wetherspoons because they get told alcohol is not served until 09.00.  Someone asked for a beer at 08.20 and got aggressive when he was refused.  Ferries, been followed by drunken revellers at Poole to the taxi.  Group of men who had been boozing all day on a day trip.  They were drinking heavily on the way out, very loud and one kept pestering me.  Tried to ignore him, but the rest joined in with being lairy.  I sat the other end of Barf on the way home as they were steaming drunk on the return journey, but just carried on drinking more and more.  Disembarking the one pestering me tried to get me to let him come home with me, he carried on right through customs and right out to the taxi rank.  Luckily there was a taxi there which I got in so I was safe, but for goodness sake, if there hadn’t been anything waiting...   I told him to eff off at the last moment along with a few more choice words and we drove off.   The way the British treat drink has really turned me teetotal.

Why do groups of men (and even women) have to get so steaming drunk.  Women are just as bad as men nowadays.  I had trouble a few weeks ago with a drunken woman who’d erroneously knocked on my door while looking for another flat in my block and tried to force her way in.  And punched me when I pushed her back out. I overpowered her easily despite her punching me, and the police are involved.  So really I have had drunks up to here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sounds like it is getting more like Plymouth Khaines! Sad.

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1 hour ago, Khaines said:

Like the wild west in Bournemouth.  I see it as drunks just ruin things for everyone else. Saddening.

Drunks are bad, but what I hate is the junkies and zombies who actively make everyone elses businesses their own, and have no respect for people or property. There seem to be more and more of these around Plymouth, especially the port area surrounding the bottom of town. They are frequently labelled as homeless by the media, but are not in your traditional sense that they have a place to go, but choose to get wasted around the streets all day long. Again, very sad!

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I thought there were laws against that sort of behaviour (?).  What happened to the crime of being drunk and disorderly in public?

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Back to the topic - it depends on the length of the crossing.  Might have some wine with an early lunch on St Malo - Portsmouth.  Wouldn’t drink anything within 4 hours of arrival, so unlikely to have anything on the Caen route.  Might have an early sailing beer on an afternoon departure from Roscoff.  Apart from those, all our sailings tend to be overnight.

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27 minutes ago, Gareth said:

I thought there were laws against that sort of behaviour (?).  What happened to the crime of being drunk and disorderly in public?

Still on the statute book, but there are now no Police left to enforce said statute. The dross know this and hence an explosion of Public Order offences.

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55 minutes ago, hf_uk said:

Drunks are bad, but what I hate is the junkies and zombies who actively make everyone elses businesses their own, and have no respect for people or property. There seem to be more and more of these around Plymouth, especially the port area surrounding the bottom of town. They are frequently labelled as homeless by the media, but are not in your traditional sense that they have a place to go, but choose to get wasted around the streets all day long. Again, very sad!

Exactly the same here.  I use my ferry trips as an escape from it all, so when drunks ruin that as well.....  Just the English attitude to alcohol,  Drunk people turn on a coin as well,  I feel sorry for people whose trips are equally a source of getaway from the grinc at home to see it on the ships.

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The British abroad are often not a pretty sight. A friend of mine says he has stopped going to 4 star hotels in Spain at the British guests seem to be generally intent in getting drunk all day using the all inclusive facilities.

Spain has never appealed to me much, we prefer less frequented local Greek establishments which tend to be much more civilised.

Probably quite hard to get drunk in France at the moment given the exchange rate!

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The last thing I want to see when I go on holiday abroad is other Brits.  Always try to go to places where there are unlikely to be any.  North coast of Spain is very good for that - it’s essentially a holiday ground for the locals, whereas the Brits seem to feel the need to carry in heading south.  Which is great, because you feel like you are in Spain rather than some British enclave abroad.

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28 minutes ago, Gareth said:

The last thing I want to see when I go on holiday abroad is other Brits.  Always try to go to places where there are unlikely to be any.  North coast of Spain is very good for that - it’s essentially a holiday ground for the locals, whereas the Brits seem to feel the need to carry in heading south.  Which is great, because you feel like you are in Spain rather than some British enclave abroad.

Hence my preference for going to bunker complexes and museums, stuff like that. War sites are often quite solemn anyway and places like Cite De La Mer and other “family” places are rarely ruined by British drunks.  I go off out with Pascal and mostly we see other French families, very rare an English accent.  When I arrive back in Poole, even more so when the taxi gets back to Bournemouth and I see the state of the town late at night, I get a stark reminder of “home”  Cannot get indoors fast enough.

 

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Is this slag the Brits off site?i have being around in my life and there is drunks in every country.germans,French,Spanish,aussies ,Scots,Welsh etc etc the worst out of the lot are the aussies with a chip on there shoulders.i lived in Germany and Spain and there drunks are no better than us brits.so let's lay off ourselves because we are no worse than other country.just wonder why we always put ourselves down.

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I don't drink, never really have done, I was too addicted to work which finally caught up with me. I get lumbered with all the driving but I'm ok with that. I go through about 12 litres of fizzy water a week or an 8 pack of Coke Zero for a real bender! In France it has to be schweppes agrum.

 

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If airlines won't allow visibly drunk passengers on board and will refuse to serve alcohol to anyone who looks like they have already had enough, why don't the ferries apply the same principle? All duty or tax free products brought on board are, I believe, supposed to be exported intact and the bars can simply stop serving those they suspect of being over the limit. Perhaps each adult boarding card should entitle the holder to a maximum number of units per crossing and no more. Has anyone ever seen the French (or UK) immigration service pull someone aside for a breath test after disembarkation? The French boarder police are often on foot rather than in booths so would be able to smell the alcohol more easily I guess. Ed. 

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8 hours ago, nodwad said:

Is this slag the Brits off site?i have being around in my life and there is drunks in every country.germans,French,Spanish,aussies ,Scots,Welsh etc etc the worst out of the lot are the aussies with a chip on there shoulders.i lived in Germany and Spain and there drunks are no better than us brits.so let's lay off ourselves because we are no worse than other country.just wonder why we always put ourselves down.

Nodwad, it is because the Brits make a wedding of it all.  Other countries have their own drink problems but it is something the Brits really excel at.  We are world famous for our drinking habits.  As Ed said, the rules ought to apply on ferries as well.  I can think of a few certain people near me who only go on the trips for a booze up, and that would seriously affect their enjoyment of their days out. Good.  I go to DO something for the day not sink one pint after another.  These people I talk about get stuck into the spirits too.  It is just that the Brits do tend to ruin it for everyone else. 

I have seen other nationalities drunk and they are nowhere near the calibre of the Brits.   I have just spent another night listening to drunks coming out of the clubs

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9 hours ago, nodwad said:

Is this slag the Brits off site?

Well, that’s the first time we have been accused of that! Normally we get told off for slagging off the French! 🤣

“Slagging off” is rather a crude phrase, but if you mean “criticising” then we do not criticise any nationality for the sake of doing so.  But discussion of national traits and characteristics is a perfectly legitimate thing to do.  It is a fact that some Brits (both at home and abroad) take drinking to an excess, and this can sometimes reflect badly on us as a nation. Nobody, as far as I can tell, has posted anything that is out of order, and for the most part people have just reported their own experiences and observations.

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Don't think I've seen more than one or two groups of Wetherspoonistas that were tired and emotional at the ships bar. They stand out because they shout loudly!
What does occupy me sadly, rather like watching people using cutlery in the most odd way is lots of people who feel a glass or two of wine with their meal with a mere hour or so before they drive on the "wrong" side of the road or negotiate leaving the port at night in appalling weather. Legally drunk or not, it won't look good if something happens.

The relaxed nature of a nice crossing seems to lull people into thinking no further than relaxing or having a good time. Rather like the souls who feel flip flops and shorts will be ok. I do wonder if they read the safety notices around the ship. Too much alcohol is not a good mix.

And I do like a glass!

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Down here in the Borders we get a lot of German tourists usually on buses in general they are the rudest people could meet and they don’t need drink to do that , barging into shops not letting people past on pavements and not saying please or thank you.

We avoid big resorts so can’t comment on the lager lout mentality on that side of things. 

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15 hours ago, hf_uk said:

Drunks are bad, but what I hate is the junkies and zombies who actively make everyone elses businesses their own, and have no respect for people or property. There seem to be more and more of these around Plymouth, especially the port area surrounding the bottom of town. They are frequently labelled as homeless by the media, but are not in your traditional sense that they have a place to go, but choose to get wasted around the streets all day long. Again, very sad!

Ah, Union Street in Plymouth. Gateway to Britain! Luckily the new posted route to the ferries now bypasses Union Street.
Devon and Cornwall police once reported that a quarter of their budget went on policing Union Street.
Great advert for visitors to the UK off the ferry.

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10 minutes ago, straightfeed said:

Ah, Union Street in Plymouth. Gateway to Britain! Luckily the new posted route to the ferries now bypasses Union Street.
Devon and Cornwall police once reported that a quarter of their budget went on policing Union Street.
Great advert for visitors to the UK off the ferry.

Using the Licensing Act 2003 and a bit of determination it is possible to manage this problem away. But there has to be determination and the will to do it. That too often is lacking. For a start it has to be seen as a problem...

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53 minutes ago, Millsy said:

Using the Licensing Act 2003 and a bit of determination it is possible to manage this problem away. But there has to be determination and the will to do it. That too often is lacking. For a start it has to be seen as a problem...

The words so often bandied about is “complex needs”. This expression always rears it’s head whenever there is so so called “crackdown” on the beggars, street drinkers and addicts that make like a misery for everyday families going about their business.  Nobody ever explains what these complex needs are and nothing ever changes.  Bournemouth used to be quite a posh town decades ago, now it is like a cross between the Wild West and some kind of old fashioned lunatic asylum with all the drink and drug addled everywhere.  Always violence and nothing ever gets done, because those who try and make excuses for them throw spanners in the works if anyone suggests cleaning the town up.  Poole Council got tough on street beggars and the Echo comments were full of the “they need help, not punishment” types.  If they refuse help and carry being a nuisance on then why not get tough on them.  Oh, I forgot, the dear souls have complex needs..🙄

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