Jump to content
Fine Whine

PIP Berth 2 Extension work

Recommended Posts

37 minutes ago, Stefeni said:

Southampton wants to take more of the very large Cruise liners and Portsmouth is happy to take the smaller liners off their hands i have heard we could even take ships the size of the Oriana and similar sized ships at PIP on the extended berth 2

Even a ship the same size as Oriana (now called Piano Land), would be too long for berth 2 after the extension. Piano Land is 260 metres. The only ships this is likely to attract are Fred Olsen, Saga and Crystal Cruises, all of which have been in before anyway. The other possible cruise line will be Aida Cruises, most of their ships will fit after the extension.

Edited by TonyMWeaver

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, TonyMWeaver said:

Even a ship the same size as Oriana (now called Piano Land), would be too long for berth 2 after the extension. Piano Land is 260 metres. The only ships this is likely to attract are Fred Olsen, Saga and Crystal Cruises, all of which have been in before anyway. The other possible cruise line will be Aida Cruises, most of their ships will fit after the extension.

Piano Land??? Seriously?

What is the point of extending the berth then if the only ships that can berth there are ones that have been before?

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, The Ferry Man said:

Piano Land??? Seriously?

What is the point of extending the berth then if the only ships that can berth there are ones that have been before?

Crystal Symphony has been in before, but Crystal Serenity hasn't. Like I said, most of the Aida fleet would fit, not the newer ones though. Saga 'Spirit of Discovery' hasn't been in yet but would be able to after the extension. I'm not sure if all of the Fred Olsen fleet have been in Portsmouth but most have. None of the larger cruise lines would ever fit in Portsmouth.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The other issue is how many passengers can really be catered for in the terminal. Cruise ships need a slick way of moving luggage around, check in . car parking, customs etc..

Southampton works well as there is a decent amount of space.

A cruise ship needs to be on the berth for about 12 hours - I am not sure how that will work if usage increases. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, David Williams said:

The other issue is how many passengers can really be catered for in the terminal. Cruise ships need a slick way of moving luggage around, check in . car parking, customs etc..

Southampton works well as there is a decent amount of space.

A cruise ship needs to be on the berth for about 12 hours - I am not sure how that will work if usage increases. 

Its owned by the City Council, who probably can`t see further than the nice fat invoice they can send for every berthing

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, David Williams said:

The other issue is how many passengers can really be catered for in the terminal. Cruise ships need a slick way of moving luggage around, check in . car parking, customs etc..

Southampton works well as there is a decent amount of space.

A cruise ship needs to be on the berth for about 12 hours - I am not sure how that will work if usage increases. 

The port has served a 48 cruise ship schedule this year and well over 2/3's have been turnarounds rather than calls and can cater for in excess of 2000 pax at any one time. The car park has space for over 500 vehicles and includes pre bookable valet parking. The terminal itself is due a large overhaul with separate waiting, catering and customs/baggage areas for cruise passengers.

Footfall inside the terminal from ferry passengers is actually low. Most travellers arrive and stay waiting with a vehicle checking in at a booth, there is also 3 or 4 outside toilet blocks to cater for the various marshalling stages. Per capita I think you see more movement inside the terminal at Ouistreham, the cafe is very popular.

The terminal isn't used in the same way as say Newcastle or Hull with many travellers being footies enjoying a mini cruise, you don't get hoards of people hanging around like you did in the days of Pride of Bilbao.

Have a look at Portsmouth port's website there's a huge amount of info.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The final cruise ship of 2019 and to first use the extended Berth 2 in Portsmouth International Port - Phoenix Reisen 'Artania' alongside until 23:00 this evening. Photo thanks to SMS Tugmaster Lloyd Thompson. 

 

Edited by TonyMWeaver
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
37 minutes ago, TonyMWeaver said:

Must be if they are using it today.

Makes sense! 

It just looked like a construction site last week! Anyone seen the finished article yet? An end to the ship shuffle hopefully now three ferries can berth 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The works isn't completely finished yet, I can't see the extension behind the ship in the picture. Artania is 230m. the berth should be extending to 255m so there's still work to do then work gets underway on the terminal building.

Edited by TonyMWeaver
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, neilcvx said:

Need to get Lee Shaw out to measure it.

The answer will come back in tug-lengths though, so we'll need a conversion chart. There's a joke in there somewhere but as this is a family site I'll stop now. Ed. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, Cabin-boy said:

The answer will come back in tug-lengths though, so we'll need a conversion chart. There's a joke in there somewhere but as this is a family site I'll stop now. Ed. 

Seems to me like a task for tug man Cal Libb-Reight.

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, TonyMWeaver said:

The works isn't completely finished yet, I can't see the extension behind the ship in the picture. Artania is 230m. the berth should be extending to 255m so there's still work to do then work gets underway on the terminal building.

Just going back to this slightly, so she is the first new ship to use the extended berth, but the berth is only partly extended with more extension to come?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, neilcvx said:

That’s the guy that measured WB Yeats.

The Chinese yard building the E-Flexers have got a guy in place specifically in charge of checking all the measurements. His name is Sum Ting Wong. Ed. 

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As you can see from this photo, the quayside doesn't need to be as long as the ship provided that headropes can be got ashore somewhere, in the case of Portsmouth to a dolphin. The main entry port is usually amidships on cruise ships. However cruise ships load and unload from lower decks, deck 5 on Magellan so the height above the quayside is lower than on ferries where the passenger access is above the vehicle decks. Towers should not normally be needed. Cruise ships also carry their own gangways for use where there are no local facilities.

The gangway usually seems to project 90 degrees from the side of the ship and in some cases can be quite long, as in the photo, needing a lot clear quay width. Long gangways with a gentle slope are desirable on cruise ships with their high proportion of elderly passengers, many with walking difficulties. A look online suggests that Portsmouth are using shortish gangways for cruise ships. The steps adjust automatically to the slope as the tide rises and falls. The Portsmouth one in the link looks a bit steep to me, compare it with the one being used for Magellan at Honfleur.

https://www.cruisebritain.org/news/portsmouth-international-port-introduce-covered-gangways/

 

(DTR)Magellan (29).JPG

Edited by cvabishop
  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, cvabishop said:

As you can see from this photo, the quayside doesn't need to be as long as the ship provided that headropes can be got ashore somewhere, in the case of Portsmouth to a dolphin. The main entry port is usually amidships on cruise ships. However cruise ships load and unload from lower decks, deck 5 on Magellan so the height above the quayside is lower than on ferries where the passenger access is above the vehicle decks. Towers should not normally be needed. Cruise ships also carry their own gangways for use where there are no local facilities.

The gangway usually seems to project 90 degrees from the side of the ship and in some cases can be quite long, as in the photo, needing a lot clear quay width. Long gangways with a gentle slope are desirable on cruise ships with their high proportion of elderly passengers, many with walking difficulties. A look online suggests that Portsmouth are using shortish gangways for cruise ships. The steps adjust automatically to the slope as the tide rises and falls. The Portsmouth one in the link looks a bit steep to me, compare it with the one being used for Magellan at Honfleur.

https://www.cruisebritain.org/news/portsmouth-international-port-introduce-covered-gangways/

 

(DTR)Magellan (29).JPG

That's how they manage to berth WBY in Milford.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...