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zuludelta

The future of ferries could be fibreglass...

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Therein lies a curiosity of mine.  What happens to the ever-growing number of glass fibre yachts that have reached the ends of their lives?  I’m not aware of any kind of recycling system.  So as far as I am aware, the world just gets fuller and fuller of fibre yachts abandoned in rivers.  Project that to the commercial world and.....

But in any case, surely glass fibre has questionable strength for a full-sized commercial ferry?

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We now have a recycling system in France, financed by new boat builders and government. Early days but the right direction.

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12 minutes ago, Gareth said:

 

But in any case, surely glass fibre has questionable strength for a full-sized commercial ferry?

I don't know.

But I was listening to a podcast recently where, upon the introduction of plastic kettles....a lot of people said they would never use one. And today its probably difficult to find a metal one...

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3 minutes ago, colin said:

We now have a recycling system in France, financed by new boat builders and government. Early days but the right direction.

Is the government involved in everything in France Colin? :)

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17 minutes ago, Gareth said:

Therein lies a curiosity of mine.  What happens to the ever-growing number of glass fibre yachts that have reached the ends of their lives?  I’m not aware of any kind of recycling system.  So as far as I am aware, the world just gets fuller and fuller of fibre yachts abandoned in rivers.  Project that to the commercial world and.....

But in any case, surely glass fibre has questionable strength for a full-sized commercial ferry?

As Colin says it's recycling use is in it's infancy but it's now a constituent of modern cement used extensively by global manufacturer Lafarge.

This is a German company which is heavily involved.

https://fiberline.com/news/miljoe/compocycle-new-concept-recycling

Fibre glass is actually stronger and more flexible than steel. 250 kg of fibre glass has the same tensile strength as 1000 kg of steel. It also has greater weight bearing properties.

Those members of the forum who are sailing/boating enthusiasts have probably noticed that many modern pontoon gratings are now made of glass fibre.

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Thanks Jonno.

A few other assorted thoughts spring to mind.  All those gelcoat repairs are a pain in the next without the ability to “paint over the cracks”.  Livery options will be interesting.  And let’ not get started on osmosis.....! 🤣

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The longevity of GRP yachts has long been a source of frustration to boat builders wantiing to sell new ones. The old ones seem to be near indestructible. Just look at the number of 1970s Westerly yachts in any marina, many looking as good as new.

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1 minute ago, cvabishop said:

The longevity of GRP yachts has long been a source of frustration to boat builders wantiing to sell new ones. The old ones seem to be near indestructible. Just look at the number of 1970s Westerly yachts in any marina, many looking as good as new.

Great and very salient example. The home fitness company Nordic Track nearly went bankrupt for the same reason - their products were too good.

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Gareth, yes osmosis can be an issue. I had it treated on the 1984 Jaguar 25 I bought in 1994. but the end result was an almost new hull.

DSCN0797.JPG

Edited by cvabishop
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8 minutes ago, cvabishop said:

Happy days!

I often wonder what fate has befallen those in my yachting history.  But it’s almost impossible to find out.

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24 minutes ago, cvabishop said:

The longevity of GRP yachts has long been a source of frustration to boat builders wantiing to sell new ones. The old ones seem to be near indestructible. Just look at the number of 1970s Westerly yachts in any marina, many looking as good as new.

Looking as good as new is maybe an exaggeration, but here’s my baby - she allows me to escape the pressures of the world, witness  fabulous sunsets and enjoy a privileged view of the world (well Chichester Harbour in this case) you don’t see from land - and it doesn’t need to break the bank either...

Chris

7EB3C415-A92E-4320-80AE-2AC9F3F0FB64.jpeg

7C96835C-A777-4281-A7F4-9828035A0B0C.jpeg

C36E669B-AB43-4426-936A-BB2E8E38A13D.jpeg

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Back in my youth many years ago the Falmouth working boat Six Brothers broke her moorings in a SE gale and was smashed up, a fibre glass yacht went in along side her and apparently was saved and the hole in her bottom repaired.  Any members from Falmouth will know the story.

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7 hours ago, Gareth said:

I often wonder what fate has befallen those in my yachting history.  But it’s almost impossible to find out.

This is what I got most of my yachting experience on (once I'd graduated from Mirror, Topper and Laser dingies):

https://woodenships.co.uk/sailing-yacht/holman-bermudan-sloop/

We spent many hours in the Solent and chugging up and down the Hamble river. Plus almost as many hours each winter stripping bak the paint and redoing the antifouling! 

This is an interesting article about her designer and his many creations.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.classicboat.co.uk/articles/the-life-and-designs-of-kim-holman/&ved=2ahUKEwilmp3Z2I7mAhVLx4UKHZEtAYgQFjAAegQIBRAB&usg=AOvVaw3rmvznr4IazRQF4Nde5mmn

Our friend who owned her in the late 80s and early 90s sold her and then turned his attention (with my father and a Scottish friend) to yachting in Western Scotland and they bought a fibreglass yacht kept at Tighnabruaich in Argyle but sold it on five years later.

Ed. 

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7 hours ago, Fine Whine said:

Looking as good as new is maybe an exaggeration, but here’s my baby - she allows me to escape the pressures of the world, witness  fabulous sunsets and enjoy a privileged view of the world (well Chichester Harbour in this case) you don’t see from land - and it doesn’t need to break the bank either...

Chris

7EB3C415-A92E-4320-80AE-2AC9F3F0FB64.jpeg

7C96835C-A777-4281-A7F4-9828035A0B0C.jpeg

C36E669B-AB43-4426-936A-BB2E8E38A13D.jpeg

Named after a fine ABBA song too!

She's very smart Chris.

We had an Aquafibre Pearl 28 cruiser on the broads for a few years until we realised that everything you see can be enjoyed hiring without the yearly maintenance & marina fees and years ago I had a little GP14 on a trailer which Mrs J's uncle taught me the basics in when he wasn't on the bridge of Oriana.

Never did get around to serious sailing really, dunno why?

 

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11 hours ago, zuludelta said:

Is the government involved in everything in France Colin? :)

Well, .... yes. That is one of the big culture shocks for Brits moving here. The state is the people, for the people. OK, for the people to constantly complain about, but from your local Mairie upwards, there is much more acceptance and integration of the state in everyday lives and activities. Bearing in mind that we pay the most tax in Europe, you can perhaps understand why we expect the flip side.

As for GRP construction... Best to forget those 3 letters as modern construction uses a range of materials and techniques - carbon, Kevlar, aramid honeycomb sandwich, infusion, autoclave ovens ..... Biger and bigger vessels are being built form these composite materials, and not just marine vessels of course. The proposed new wind powered freighter for Renault and St Pierre et Miquelon in to be built in composite. Gitana, Macif, Sodebo and Actual are over 120' trimarans, currently racing (and breaking) around the Atlantic, often averaging around 40 knots, foiling, for sustained periods. The options and flexibility opened up by composite construction are pretty amazing.

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I couldn't agree more, @colin is bang on the money. I think I've mentioned it before, Buckypaper is another carbon based composite being researched and both can be combined without the difficulties found with aluminium and steel.

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