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Please remember - this thread can get a bit heated at times... try to keep politics out of it, and be respectful to the views of others.

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Well, I suppose it just goes to show that almost 50% of the population is below average intelligence!

In my supermarket today there were a lot of empty shelves and it was very busy. No obvious sign of desperate panic buying but you do wonder why somebody wants to buy 6 2 liitre bottles of sparkling water! 'I bought it because it was there' maybe?

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We've a young crowd in here today!

It will be pasta and rice next, how have they got through the stockpiles from March?

Neil’s photo reminded me of my own mother, also a Margaret and 88 years young, lives on her own in a retirement flat near Bristol. She hasn’t seen anyone for over a week now so really important point

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I wonder if BF are still taking balance payments for crossings due at the end of May / beginning of June. If so they should have the money for cash refunds?

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32 minutes ago, cvabishop said:

but you do wonder why somebody wants to buy 6 2 liitre bottles of sparkling water!

It's my drink of choice but it doesn't mean i'll be nipping out to clear the shelves. We also have a few farm shops out towards York & Ripon for milk, eggs, cheese & meat and their veg/spuds are cheaper anyway.

Had a trawl through the chest freezer too, looks like king prawns, whitebait, gateaux & viennetta will be on the menu!

 

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You do wonder about some supermarkets and their responsibility fir its' customers. Watched a Sainsbury store on TV last night showing it opening early for the oldies. Queues outside before opening and very crowded once inside. No attempts to separate people at all, snd the pensioners didn't seem to bother either. A couple of “at risk” ladies interviewed said they'd shopped so they dudn't have to come out again - may be too late.

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2 hours ago, BigDW1946 said:

You do wonder about some supermarkets and their responsibility fir its' customers. Watched a Sainsbury store on TV last night showing it opening early for the oldies. Queues outside before opening and very crowded once inside.

I have been shopping for a few weeks in that magic quiet hour. Sainsburys plan seem to be to get all their old customers dealt with early so that the regular customers have it quiet for the rest of the day.

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Just got back from a trip to Waitrose, trying to pick up things that were unavailable yesterday. They are having the first hour, 8am-9am,  for elderly and vulnerable customers in future, although not turning anyone younger away today. There was a security guard and two managers on the door. A very elderly man was getting very agitated and he was led away. Everyone else calm and doing as they were told, and the queue to get in moved very quickly.

Back on matters BF, I have a hotel holiday booked for end of June and the final payment is due on 2nd April. Will be interesting to see if BF take the payment and how things pan out generally.

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On a more serious note we have crossings booked for the beginning of May and for September do you think it will be possible to use the vouchers from the May crossing for the September balance. I will ask BF directly when they contact me but just interested in your thoughts

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Just arrived back on IOM from a week in Spain - return flights from Malaga to Gatwick cancelled so crossed border into Gibraltar for flight to Manchester before border was closed to all but key workers and residents in Gibraltar then went to Heysham for the ferry to Douglas. All arrivals on IOM either by sea or air have to self isolate for fourteen days - penalty is £10,000 fine or 3 months in Gaol.... first case of covid19 recorded in IOM today - a traveller returning from Spain. 

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Also just heard from friends in UK who attended an early morning OAP slot at Sainsburys and they said they hadn't seen so many elderly and vulnerable people all together in one place since their last Fred Olsen Cruise.....

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2 hours ago, Manxscorpio said:

Just arrived back on IOM from a week in Spain - return flights from Malaga to Gatwick cancelled so crossed border into Gibraltar for flight to Manchester before border was closed to all but key workers and residents in Gibraltar then went to Heysham for the ferry to Douglas. All arrivals on IOM either by sea or air have to self isolate for fourteen days - penalty is £10,000 fine or 3 months in Gaol.... first case of covid19 recorded in IOM today - a traveller returning from Spain. 

This is from BBC news:

First British arrest for failing to self-isolate

A man has been arrested for allegedly failing to self-isolate after arriving on the Isle of Man - thought to be the first person held in the British Isles for breaching quarantine rules.

The island passed emergency legislation requiring new arrivals to quarantine themselves for 14 days regardless of symptoms on Tuesday.

The 26-year-old man, who was arrested after failing to self-isolate on arrival, could face a fine of up to £10,000 or three months in prison.

Ed

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1 minute ago, Cabin-boy said:

This is from BBC news:

First British arrest for failing to self-isolate

A man has been arrested for allegedly failing to self-isolate after arriving on the Isle of Man - thought to be the first person held in the British Isles for breaching quarantine rules.

The island passed emergency legislation requiring new arrivals to quarantine themselves for 14 days regardless of symptoms on Tuesday.

The 26-year-old man, who was arrested after failing to self-isolate on arrival, could face a fine of up to £10,000 or three months in prison.

Ed

We were on the same ferry as him - got a good telling off after facebook post

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How differently things have been handled elsewhere.. my son in Hong Kong reports that the virus appeared there very early at least three months ago, but they have had strict testing and monitoring of people's temperatures, efficient tracing contacts of infected people, everyone has worn face masks from the very start, everyone has carried hand sanitiser for door handles and supermarket trolleys etc., schools were quicky closed, the border with mainland China was quickly closed - and as a result of all the precautions taken in a crowded city of 7 million people they have only had 7 deaths caused by this virus in the last three months.  The New York Times published an article a few days ago spelling out how Hong Kong has done it - and gives detail about Singapore too.

 

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2 hours ago, Manxscorpio said:

We were on the same ferry as him - got a good telling off after facebook post

Manxscorpio, did you get the telling off?  Or was it the guy who got himself arrested?

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37 minutes ago, Buzzbee said:

Manxscorpio, did you get the telling off?  Or was it the guy who got himself arrested?

Not me Officer.... it was the guy who got arrested and received a caution

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Welcome back to Europe. We are indeed all in this together. An unprecedented crisis.

My heartfelt wishes to all members. Be careful, stay safe, keep others safe.

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We are sailing into completely uncharted waters at the moment. The rules of the game are changing both in the UK and in France. We live in Oxfordshire but have a long-standing cottage in Manche. We were over for ten days at the end of February (it was unbelievaby wet, but the primroses were coming out). We may not be able to get back for months, probably some time in the autumn and God knows what the place will look like by then. The grass will have grown as high as an elephants eye and the courtyard be full of weeds. Hopefully the cottage will still be standing. But, hey, France hasn't actually been invaded and life will retrun to normal at some point. Brittany Ferries will return to some sort of normality and we can get back to normal.

Keep smiling

 

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They are talking about the social distancing lasting a year so it might be even longer it’s certainly something none of have experienced or hopefully ever will again, the long term psychological and economic implications will last for decades.

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6 hours ago, nottingham said:

We will need optimism and determination to get through!

In the meantime more scenic views and archived shipping pics do pass the time

Well said.
In all this, Supermarkets, freedom to roam anywhere we want, job security, schooling, life in general comes nowhere near the real truth in all this. 
This has shown us that we need an expanded health care system to prop up our society. It was sadly underfunded and understaffed and ill equipped. Never again surely.

To "optimism  and determination" I would add learning about life. Sister in law, who has received a refund from P&O for her cancelled cruise with the family (she does about 2-3 a year) has told us that she is having second thoughts! That's after being in intensive care a couple of years ago, heart ops, breathing problems, incontinence and depleted memory.The sun shone a few days ago, so she went out and had a pub lunch!

Stu

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This article is interesting and tallies with some of the comments and opinions I've heard from doctors here in France. 

https://www.bbc.com/news/health-51979654

Just as a comparison, in 2018 there were a total of around 633,000 deaths (taken from the Statista website) in Italy so around 1% of the population estimated at 60 million. That equates to around 1,700 deaths per day. Yesterday there were over 600 deaths directly attributed to COVID-19 in the country. I would be interested, so as to better understand the implications, to know the total number of deaths (from all causes) in the country for the same 24-hour period to first try and understand how many of those dying are in fact additional to normal and secondly how many fewer people are now dying from car accidents and industrial accidents and whether subsequently the actual daily average is in fact lower than usual. 

Ed

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My wife is an NHS consultant and has a perspective on the CV19 death statistics that is worth sharing.

Many of the people that are dying officially as a result of CV19 are people that are already ill and would almost certainly have died anyway in the coming months.  For example - the “youngest victim in the UK” recently caused a bit of a sensation in the UK on the grounds that he was only 45.  What was less commonly reported was that this person was in the advanced stages of motor neurone disease and was at the end of the second year after being given two years to live.  Many of the elderly victims, too, were already very ill and in the process of dying of that thing.  But they go down in the CV19 death statistics as dying of CV19 when, really, CV19 had very little to do with it and just accelerated something that was already happening.

That doesn’t in any way lessen the sadness, and it doesn’t apply to all cases, but it is a significant factor that gives some perspective on superficially horrifying statistics.

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