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A Little Light Relief for These Testing Times.


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1 hour ago, VikingVoyager said:

Make me wonder, are there many examples of planes being diverted to runways where they can land but never take off from (no matter how lightly loaded)?

When flight planning you create a list of diversion airports / airfields (civilian and military) than can handle the plane. Landing anywhere else and not flying the plane again is a crash.

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Wonder how the Aussies will get round this one..🤣

A Change in Perception about Cruise Ships ............

Regarding space shuttles, am interesting book by a French photographer called Jonk whom I follow on Facebook, visited the Russian Space Shuttle base in Kazakhstan.  He is an urban explorer and got int

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2 minutes ago, Shipping Forecast said:

When flight planning you create a list of diversion airports / airfields (civilian and military) than can handle the plane. Landing anywhere else and not flying the plane again is a crash.

Makes me wonder at there any examples of planes being diverted to crashing without being badly damaged on runways where they can land but never take off from (no matter how lightly loaded)?

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9 minutes ago, VikingVoyager said:

Makes me wonder at there any examples of planes being diverted to crashing without being badly damaged on runways where they can land but never take off from (no matter how lightly loaded)?

There are some interesting related stories here:

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.quora.com/What-happens-if-a-large-aircraft-emergency-lands-on-a-small-airstrip-with-no-damage-and-the-runway-is-not-long-enough-for-a-take-off&ved=2ahUKEwi-yOKN66fsAhWGlhQKHX7xCA0QFjAGegQIBBAB&usg=AOvVaw2AlUSVM0sOV0TzllVLJwqQ

Ed

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I was told that my local Navy airstrip Culdrose has a printed price list for civilian aircraft landings and takeoffs. It includes the price of a 747 landing even though its too short for it to take off again

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13 minutes ago, BobCrox said:

I was told that my local Navy airstrip Culdrose has a printed price list for civilian aircraft landings and takeoffs. It includes the price of a 747 landing even though its too short for it to take off again

I'm sure I heard once that the other runway in Cornwall at RAF St Mawgan could be used by the Space Shuttle if they had a problem as it was the first runway long enough this side of the pond.

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21 minutes ago, rileyman said:

There was also Elvington in East Yorkshire as a Shuttle alternative as it has a 2 mile runway. It is home to the Yorkshire Air Museum and hosts various speed record attempts

You can imagine the the welcome: "Eh! You can't park that thing there! What do you mean it doesn't have any take-off engines? OK, come and have a cuppa while I get Compo, Clegg And Foggy to take a look."

Ed

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Thanks, Ed. 

I was at work and thought that there was no way I was going to see it, but then had to drive from London to Hull on the day. Unfortunately I could not stay until the take off, but it was very exciting, and close access was allowed for photos such as mine.  At the risk of boring everyone - here is the other photo that i have in the 'album'

Shuttle 2.JPG

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2 hours ago, Solo said:

I'm sure I heard once that the other runway in Cornwall at RAF St Mawgan could be used by the Space Shuttle

image.png.048c78b45bed61f1b228d8ddf71580a8.png

1 hour ago, rileyman said:

There was also Elvington in East Yorkshire as a Shuttle alternative as it has a 2 mile runway.

Depending on destination orbit the main TAL (Transoceanic Abort Landing) sites were at Morón Air Base and Zaragoza in Spain and Istres-Le Tubé Air Base in the South of France. However if mission suitable the shuttle TAL diversion sites in the British Isles were Shannon Airport and RAF Fairford. Today the sea around Shannon is now the TAL for the new Dragon capsule which means the weather has to be suitable in Ireland as well as Florida for launches.

In reality any long (over 3000m preferred) runway could be used, Elvington is just over but Newquay is 2744m. I am sure in an emergency the shuttle crew would not care so much, and the 'shuttle landing role' was claimed for many airports including Stansted.

OOI (or maybe not) the main SLF (Shuttle Landing Facility) 3 mile runway at KSC in Florida is one of the most accurately built runways in the world following the curvature of the earth. Most runways are not this accurate, Birmingham Airport being one of the most notorious examples in the UK. It is not the capital after all, so cannot expect a proper flat runway.

Runway_BHX_2014.05.26-1B.jpg

Apart from Shuttle landings, the SLF runway is also famous for gators sunbathing on it's flat reflective surface so before any aerospace activities, crews have to shoo them off, otherwise gator burgers for tea.

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5 hours ago, BobCrox said:

I was told that my local Navy airstrip Culdrose has a printed price list for civilian aircraft landings and takeoffs. It includes the price of a 747 landing even though its too short for it to take off again

Knock Airport a small regional airport in the West of Ireland has had a few A380s land there recently ,but they can never take off from there again , all arrived for dismantling .

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Regarding space shuttles, am interesting book by a French photographer called Jonk whom I follow on Facebook, visited the Russian Space Shuttle base in Kazakhstan.  He is an urban explorer and got into the abandoned space shuttle complex at Baikonur where he got to see the remains of the abandoned aircraft, plus the Energia launcher.  Amazing images.

http://www.jonk-photography.com/book-baikonur/

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The Russian Buran shuttle in some ways was better than the US version. The one time it flew it was fully automatic including landing, something shuttle never did. Only with the newer ‘secret’ X37 mini shuttle does the US have this ability.

The US still uses Russian rocket engines on some of their rockets (ULA).

Unfortunately, like so many things that came out of Russia then and arguably today, the system / politics got in the way of some great achievements and continuing progress.

That the Buran still exists unused and decaying in a decrepit hanger is very sad.

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Yes, Buran no longer exists - they moved the K2-Ptichka and Orbiter OK-4M to another building after the building collapsed and Buran was destroyed.  8 employees also lost their lives.  Those two craft are the ones in the book.
 

I have the Baikonur book - quite interesting in some parts where Jonk says he was furious at missing a nearby rocket launch as his companion who was on his turn on guard watch didn't wake him up from his turn to sleep.  And while they were there they had to be so careful of walking on debris that crackled and rustled underfoot when armed guards did their rounds.  They had to be so careful not to make a sound when there was some military security bloke standing almost just below them.

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The answer to last weekend's trivia question was in fact Gibraltar.

Here's the puzzler for this weekend:

If you wanted to visit New London Bridge you would go to London and find it a few hundred yards upstream of Tower Bridge. But where would you need to go to find the 'old' London Bridge which stood in more or less the same position until it was replaced?

Ed

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56 minutes ago, Cabin-boy said:

The answer to last weekend's trivia question was in fact Gibraltar.

Here's the puzzler for this weekend:

If you wanted to visit New London Bridge you would go to London and find it a few hundred yards upstream of Tower Bridge. But where would you need to go to find the 'old' London Bridge which stood in more or less the same position until it was replaced?

Ed

I'd go and see a broad ....

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6 hours ago, Cabin-boy said:

The answer to last weekend's trivia question was in fact Gibraltar.

Here's the puzzler for this weekend:

If you wanted to visit New London Bridge you would go to London and find it a few hundred yards upstream of Tower Bridge. But where would you need to go to find the 'old' London Bridge which stood in more or less the same position until it was replaced?

Ed

It's in Arizona in  the USA. The guy who bought it and shipped it there though he was buying Tower Bridge.

 

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