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Booze Allowances for 2021


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Irish Revenue and Customs have been getting increasingly aggressive of late, often suggesting to prospective booze cruisers heading to France that the EU paid rules and quantities are an absolute rath

You might want to factor in meeting up with all your Celtic cousins along the way , the ones you never knew you had , by the time you get to Belfast you won't have anything left to declare .

It’s good and generous for duty free but will hit those of us who bring back duty paid. Last time we brought back 120 bottles of wine and 48 bottles of fizz and vermouth that is not available in the U

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3 hours ago, neilcvx said:

It’s not the end of the world but it’s just another thing to add to the hassle of customs , I wonder how it will work at the NI - Eire border?

There won't be a border between NI and the Republic , there may( or not) be a border in the Irish sea between NI and Britain .

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2 minutes ago, Chef said:

There won't be a border between NI and the Republic ( we stopped using the  Eire thing long time ago ) , there may( or not) be a border in the Irish sea between NI and Britain .

You’re a very optimistic person.

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Nowhere near as generous as the old “EU paid“ rules with 90 litres of wine, 110 litres of beer, etc. However those in Northern Ireland can land those quantities at Dublin, Cork, or Rosslare and drive across the border with no hassle. It would also work for those living in Northern UK if they take an extra ferry crossing.

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7 minutes ago, BigDW1946 said:

However those in Northern Ireland can land those quantities at Dublin, Cork, or Rosslare and drive across the border with no hassle. It would also work for those living in Northern UK if they take an extra ferry crossing.

This seems to be one of the first tests of the Irish rules. The new rules apply just to GB, they haven’t agreed how it will work in Northern Ireland, the report says

The consultation focused on the treatment in Great Britain (GB). The government continues to work with the Joint Committee on the implementation of the Northern Ireland Protocol. The government is also committed to providing guidance on how the Northern Ireland Protocol will work, including for duty-free and tax-free goods, ahead of the end of the transition period.

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1 hour ago, BigDW1946 said:

Nowhere near as generous as the old “EU paid“ rules with 90 litres of wine, 110 litres of beer, etc.

In Ireland these are guidelines not limits , considered as been reasonable for personal consumption but you can exceed them . Customs and Revenue may question that an excessive  amount could be for commercial purposes but it's up to them to prove so . Which means it becomes an Ecumenical matter  ( Father Ted ) and away you go .

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Irish Revenue and Customs have been getting increasingly aggressive of late, often suggesting to prospective booze cruisers heading to France that the EU paid rules and quantities are an absolute rather than indicative limit, which is patently not true. That hasn’t stopped them from seizing either the whole lot or allowing the occupant to keep 90 litres of wine and confiscating  the rest, without any proof whether said goods will be used for personal consumption or not. The customer then gets a letter a week later showing how to appeal against the decision, they appeal and within a few days are directed to a warehouse in Dublin to be reunited with their precious cargo. 

The T’s and C’s of the letter state the goods will be released « without prejudice », meaning Revenue can’t be challenged as they know they don’t have a legal leg to stand on. It’s all part of a campaign to allegedly stop the illegal smuggling of excise products for resale in pubs, clubs and restaurants which is fair enough, that’s against the law. But these individuals visit us once a year to buy for home consumption, have been legally doing so for over 25 years and enjoy the craic of the trip over to France for good measure.

It would appear to me that having signed up to the Single Market back in January 1993 Ireland as a country has done pretty well out of the EU with billions invested in infrastructure projects. The down side is you adhere to EU rules and if that means citizens from one country can buy duty paid goods in another one because taxation is lower then so be it - you can’t have it both ways.

Chris
 

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21 hours ago, David Williams said:

Did it cost much to repair the suspension ?

Funny you  should say that, on one of our shopping trips, one of the rear springs went ping on my T4 transporter VAN.

I blamed the poor quality springs myself, replaced them with Einbach heavy duty rears (rated 1500kg axle load) not had a problem since.

 

Rhys

 

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4 hours ago, Fine Whine said:

Irish Revenue and Customs have been getting increasingly aggressive of late, often suggesting to prospective booze cruisers heading to France that the EU paid rules and quantities are an absolute rather than indicative limit, which is patently not true. That hasn’t stopped them from seizing either the whole lot or allowing the occupant to keep 90 litres of wine and confiscating  the rest, without any proof whether said goods will be used for personal consumption or not. The customer then gets a letter a week later showing how to appeal against the decision, they appeal and within a few days are directed to a warehouse in Dublin to be reunited with their precious cargo. 

The T’s and C’s of the letter state the goods will be released « without prejudice », meaning Revenue can’t be challenged as they know they don’t have a legal leg to stand on. It’s all part of a campaign to allegedly stop the illegal smuggling of excise products for resale in pubs, clubs and restaurants which is fair enough, that’s against the law. But these individuals visit us once a year to buy for home consumption, have been legally doing so for over 25 years and enjoy the craic of the trip over to France for good measure.

It would appear to me that having signed up to the Single Market back in January 1993 Ireland as a country has done pretty well out of the EU with billions invested in infrastructure projects. The down side is you adhere to EU rules and if that means citizens from one country can buy duty paid goods in another one because taxation is lower then so be it - you can’t have it both ways.

Chris
 

The UK customs were trying that nonsense at one stage and, as said here in the Free Market in the EU they had not a leg to stand on. I seem to recall someone took it to court HMRC lost and next thing you know the customs checks stopped.

They have mounted some pretty aggressive campaigns tracking those selling into the trade since then though, which is as it should be. 

 

Rhys

 

 

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2 minutes ago, Penlan said:

The UK customs were trying that nonsense at one stage and, as said here in the Free Market in the EU they had not a leg to stand on. I seem to recall someone took it to court HMRC lost and next thing you know the customs checks stopped.

They have mounted some pretty aggressive campaigns tracking those selling into the trade since then though, which is as it should be. 

 

Rhys

 

 

They certainly did..Hull was the worst, which is where they have/had a main base. To say they were amateurish would be an understatement especially when confronted with the law, so they tended to be aggressive. Managers refused to come out of their offices. What was worse was they only ever stopped UK registered cars. Often there were some rough looking European reg vehicles with very dodgy looking occupants who were given free passage.

  All designed to intimidate

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Now I am not suggesting we flout international or UK law even in a 'specific and limited' way, but I do wonder what resources and facilities customs at Plymouth, Portsmouth and Poole will have available to ensure we 'law breakers are caught red (white or rose) - handed

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On 12/09/2020 at 19:54, neilcvx said:

So if I sail to Rosslare then get the Belfast Cairnryan ferry I will be ok .

Given the additional costs of those crossings as opposed to crossing to England, you would need to be buying an enormous amount of alcohol to save any money.

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On ‎12‎/‎09‎/‎2020 at 19:54, neilcvx said:

So if I sail to Rosslare then get the Belfast Cairnryan ferry I will be ok .

You might want to factor in meeting up with all your Celtic cousins along the way , the ones you never knew you had , by the time you get to Belfast you won't have anything left to declare .

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10 minutes ago, KenTownley said:

So what about Ricard in 2lt bottles bought at the hypermarket?

A fingers crossed that Customs don't care too much! As an example, cigarettes in Australia are sold in packs of 25 or more, so therefore a carton is generally 250 cigarettes. Never known anyone have an issue with UK Customs over it.

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1 hour ago, Jim said:

A fingers crossed that Customs don't care too much! As an example, cigarettes in Australia are sold in packs of 25 or more, so therefore a carton is generally 250 cigarettes. Never known anyone have an issue with UK Customs over it.

I remember when the allowance for wine was 2l and they were quite happy with 3 bottles.

However, one of the notes in the consultation was that 4.5 litres was more logical than 4 litres as that would be 6 bottles. They seem to have taken that on board as the limit for wine and fizzy wine are multiples of 4.5 (ie 18 and 9)

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22 minutes ago, David Williams said:

I remember when the allowance for wine was 2l and they were quite happy with 3 bottles.

However, one of the notes in the consultation was that 4.5 litres was more logical than 4 litres as that would be 6 bottles. They seem to have taken that on board as the limit for wine and fizzy wine are multiples of 4.5 (ie 18 and 9)

Clearly they've thwarted those who prefer the 5L boxes...

(Top tip, when done, pull out the bag from the box and inflate. Free pillow to pass out on...)

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4 minutes ago, Jim said:

Clearly they've thwarted those who prefer the 5L boxes...

(Top tip, when done, pull out the bag from the box and inflate. Free pillow to pass out on...)

As my picture at the start shows 3 * 5 litre box and 1 * 3 litre box is fine

 

 

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51 minutes ago, David Williams said:
52 minutes ago, David Williams said:

As my picture at the start shows 3 * 5 litre box and 1 * 3 litre box is fine

 

 

As my picture at the start shows 3 * 5 litre box and 1 * 3 litre box is fine

 

 

For Mrs C and myself 3 x 10 L boxes of Le Peras Merlot from an outlet "avec le Bus rouge" + 6 bottles of a decent red would be OK.  Spirits, port and sherry have always been cheaper in ASDA than the BF shop.

I seem to remember in the old pre EU days, HMRC turned a blind eye if you used your fizz allowance for extra vino.

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24 minutes ago, colinschandler said:

Spirits, port and sherry have always been cheaper in ASDA than the BF shop.

Hopefully that will change, at present they sell at French  duty and VAT paid which is not that different to UK prices for spirits, in future they should be able to sell at duty free costs which for my favourite tipple could be close to half the French cost.

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6 minutes ago, David Williams said:

Hopefully that will change, at present they sell at French  duty and VAT paid which is not that different to UK prices for spirits, in future they should be able to sell at duty free costs which for my favourite tipple could be close to half the French cost.

But I guess that as before, it will not be the full duty free cost but with a BF mark up to allow them to subsidise their discounted booze cruise fares. A small price to pay if it will enable me to continue to use Ply-Rosc to to visit our Chez Breton with only 45 miles road miles from Chez Kernow compared with over 450 miles via Ports-Caen.  I am sure that it will  also still be cost effective to buy our wine at Comptoir Bus Rouge!  See you soon Fred.

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