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Galicia - Inauguration - 27th November


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Save the date! The inauguration ceremony for Galicia's entry into the Brittany Ferries fleet will be taking place virtually on the 27th November.  Everyone will be able to take part via a weblink

Unfortunately 9h arrival turned out to be South African time - she was tying up when I got down to the port at 8h so only just getting light. She does look mighty impressive though, will try agai

What's the crusade for? We're into the 5th page of this nonsense. Every Ro-Pax and passenger ferry at sea has different levels of accommodation. Are we to begin rattling our sabres at t

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1 hour ago, Gareth said:

Still there and now 3 hours late.  At this rate the return will be a 2-nighter arriving Sunday morning and the Cherbourg crossing by day on Sunday.

Monday maybe?

Whatever happens the captain has a duty to consider the safety of his ship, crew and passengers. Better to arrive late than risk damage to vehicles or serious injury to those on board.

Chris

Edited by Fine Whine
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Whatever happens the captain has a duty to consider the safety of his ship, crew and passengers. Better to arrive late than risk damage to vehicles or serious injury to those on board.

Quite right, very easy for armchair critics to comment. It's the view of the man on the spot with the responsibility that matters. When I took my RYA yachting course it was stressed to me that any fool can put to sea in bad conditions. It is choosing not to sail that marks out the professional and competent mariner.

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5 minutes ago, cvabishop said:

Quite right, very easy for armchair critics to comment. It's the view of the man on the spot with the responsibility that matters. When I took my RYA yachting course it was stressed to me that any fool can put to sea in bad conditions. It is choosing not to sail that marks out the professional and competent mariner.

Absolutely.  To be fair, I don’t think anyone was criticising.

One of the good things about Galicia’s schedule is that there are plenty of opportunities in her weekly cycle (I make it three) to catch up when she gets behind schedule.

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1 hour ago, cvabishop said:

 It is choosing not to sail that marks out the professional and competent mariner

 

Thank you Colin. And just to remind those with short memories like me (🤣) and new members, here’s the perfect example of a completely in-competent mariner. The master of MV Epsilon who deemed it wise and safe to sail into the teeth of one of the worst storms of the decade back in February 2016. People in the know tell me she was within a few degrees of rolling so far over she would never have recovered.

Its not called the cruel sea for nothing....

Chris

With thanks to thejournal.ie and whoever took these photos...😳

 

 

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1 hour ago, cvabishop said:

Quite right, very easy for armchair critics to comment. It's the view of the man on the spot with the responsibility that matters. 

I’ve just heard through a very reliable source that there is an 8 metre/27 foot swell running outside Santander harbour this evening and any vessel leaving will have it bang on the nose. Which backs up my previous post that the delay is a “safety first” decision, regrettable but necessary.

Chris

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Magic Seaweed is showing a strong northwesterly gale blowing in which supports what Chris just posted above. It's due to continue most of the day tomorrow according to the forecast on TV here tonight so rounding the top northwest corner of France will mean heading straight into the wind. Ed. 

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Her ETA into Portsmouth is now 10am on Monday. 

With Monday usually being a layby day in Cherbourg she’ll almost certainly be back on schedule in time for her Tuesday departure to Santander. 

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In the circumstances clearly the only choice. Coming back on that route, if the weather was at all stormy, we went down to our cabin as soon as we boarded and got ready to lie down. You get very little time between leaving the port and hitting the open sea. I guess with a new, relatively untried ship, the captain will want to take no risks at all.

I hope things calm down for them soon.

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Just been told by another source that Galicia will depart Santander at 07:00 local time tomorrow, Captain will confirm at 06:00. She'll have to use more power if she is to arrive at 10:00 on Monday.

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13 hours ago, cvabishop said:

It is choosing not to sail that marks out the professional and competent mariner.

And then there are those who go the extra nine yards to try and keep the supply chains running for the benefit of the public, like Pilot Boat Coxswains! 😉

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2 hours ago, Macc2010 said:

She has now just left her berth a few minutes ago.

That’ll get her into Portsmouth mid-morning tomorrow.  Lunchtime / early afternoon off to Cherbourg and then she’ll be back on schedule by the time of tomorrow night’s sailing back from Cherbourg.

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41 minutes ago, Danim24 said:

And then there are those who go the extra nine yards to try and keep the supply chains running for the benefit of the public, like Pilot Boat Coxswains! 😉

Very true.  There are different considerations at play for vessels carrying passengers, in that the safety considerations, such as they are, in choosing not to sail a ferry are all to do with passenger tolerance and risk of passengers getting injured by one means or another.  Had the sailing been a freight-only one there would have been a very different tolerance applied (risk of cargo shifting would become the prime consideration); conditions are rarely bad enough for the intrinsic safety of the vessel herself (her ability to handle them) to become a factor.

Yachtsmen in small craft very much are making decisions based on safety of the intended passage for the vessel (as well as ability of skipper and crew to cope with them).

What pilots do, in often extreme conditions, amazes me, and I cannot begin to imagine what making that leap must be like in a seaway.  That said, there are conditions in which even they cannot operate.  Danim will, I’m sure, correct me if I’m wrong, but there are conditions under which pilot boarding operations are either suspended or brought closer to / within port confines.

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36 minutes ago, Gareth said:

Danim will, I’m sure, correct me if I’m wrong, but there are conditions under which pilot boarding operations are either suspended or brought closer to / within port confines.

Correct. It will be the transfer to/from the ship that will be the deciding factor. If the pilot feels it is unsafe then the service can be suspended. But that call won't be made from just one failed transfer, as different ships behave differently from one another.

At the pilot station I work at, the wind direction overrules strength. We can work in SW 60knots but may suspend service in NE 30knots if it is spring HW, as an example.

But, as I mentioned, it's the transfer that rules. We put to sea when everyone else has stopped.  

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4 hours ago, Chef said:

Well if it is a 07:00 departure and with the present sea state she  could only do around 10 or 12 knots , hope they have porridge on the breakfast menu .

 

Whatever there is on the menu could end up looking like porridge anyway...🙃

She's making almost 18 knots now and the sea state is dropping quite quickly as she makes her way north, should be no more than 3 metres by early afternoon so she should speed up later. I'm guessing at a 10h30 arrival into Portsmouth tomorrow

Chris

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This actually shows the flexibility of the timetable if she does the Cherbourg crossing as well. She managed to get to Santander a few hours early - presumably to avoid the weather & appears to be able to cope with an 18 ish hour delay on the return 

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14 minutes ago, David Williams said:

This actually shows the flexibility of the timetable if she does the Cherbourg crossing as well. She managed to get to Santander a few hours early

Arriving early on the slow-steaming two-nighter is not indicative of anything, but yes, her timetable is very flexible.  It should be possible for her to get back on schedule within a couple of days after any delay (barring other ones).

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29 minutes ago, Danim24 said:

Correct. It will be the transfer to/from the ship that will be the deciding factor. If the pilot feels it is unsafe then the service can be suspended. But that call won't be made from just one failed transfer, as different ships behave differently from one another.

At the pilot station I work at, the wind direction overrules strength. We can work in SW 60knots but may suspend service in NE 30knots if it is spring HW, as an example.

But, as I mentioned, it's the transfer that rules. We put to sea when everyone else has stopped.  

I have to say that watching pilots at work on a balmy July day seems like money for old rope to me (joking of course..🤣), but I only have the highest respect for you guys when it goes the other way. Out of interest what's the biggest sea you've ventured out in, and have you ever thought hang on, this isn't going too well?

Chris 

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