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Galicia - Inauguration - 27th November


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24 minutes ago, Gareth said:

Well, let’s work out what the published Portsmouth schedules tell us.  The average crossing time being allowed for Galicia’s 1-night crossings between Portsmouth and Spain is about 28 hours.  If we take 2 hours of the crossing time (port approaches, Ushant etc) as being common for both ships, that means Galicia is scheduled to take about 26 hours for the open-sea parts of the passage that PA takes 22 hours for.  That equates to about 18% longer.

If we then take 20 hours as representative of PA’s Plymouth crossing (although I know she can do it quicker), and take 90 minutes as common (approaches to Plymouth are shorter than those to Portsmouth), then apply an 18% increase to PA’s 18.5 hour open sea stretch, add the 1.5 hours back in and you get a predicted crossing time for Galicia from Plymouth of about 23.5 hours.  She could probably do it in 23, but I suspect they would schedule 24 hours in the published timetable if they ever did operate a Flexer from Plymouth.

Based my estimations on the times for the 3/12/2020 crossing and the return on the 5/12/2020 booking engine says 32.45 hours outbound and 30 Hours inboard hence my estimation of the need for two extra days of valuable holiday leave If you compare it PA or CF out of Portsmouth. Not so important if you live within an hour or so of Portsmouth I suppose but if not add on hotel costs  and extra meal costs both on board and ashore it adds up to a lot of extra cost.

I accept the inevitable but it's win win for BF and lose lose for the majority of customers who just want to get to Spain as by ferry as quickly and as economically as possible. 

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Save the date! The inauguration ceremony for Galicia's entry into the Brittany Ferries fleet will be taking place virtually on the 27th November.  Everyone will be able to take part via a weblink

Unfortunately 9h arrival turned out to be South African time - she was tying up when I got down to the port at 8h so only just getting light. She does look mighty impressive though, will try agai

What's the crusade for? We're into the 5th page of this nonsense. Every Ro-Pax and passenger ferry at sea has different levels of accommodation. Are we to begin rattling our sabres at t

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Yes, there seems to be a lot of variability in the three 1-night crossings.  The longest, as you say, is over 30 hours, and the shortest is around 27 hours.  The middle one is just over 28 hours.  No idea why they are not all the same.

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hence my estimation of the need for two extra days of valuable holiday leave If you compare it PA or CF out of Portsmouth.

But that does depend on where your journey starts and ends in the UK as you point out. (and other personal circumstances). Moreover, these are just the published timetables. The Bay itself can dictate the actual crossing times on many occasions at any time of the year so you still need to be prepared for this.

I do agree that there is a different attitude of mind between the outward and inward trips. In the past when visiting parts of France such as the Dordogne we have made time to stop off at places of interest on the outbound trip. But if you try to do that on the way back you don't really enjoy stop offs as you just want to get home as soon as possible.

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1 hour ago, jonno said:

Steve at niferry has produced another Galicia page which also includes deckplans & cabin numbers.

https://www.niferry.co.uk/introducing-brittany-ferries-galicia-with-deck-plans/

Thank you for that at long last we can see what she looks like and where all of the cabins and other things are.she look very nice and all been well we shall see for ourselves in a couple of months time.stay safe

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2 minutes ago, nodwad said:

Thank you for that at long last we can see what she looks like and where all of the cabins and other things are.she look very nice and all been well we shall see for ourselves in a couple of months time.stay safe

Yes beats BF off the presses, looks like it was collated using stuff that BF published, the video plus the Stena layouts !

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I see a few comments about the cf I have sailed her her many times.as a pet owner I much preferred her with the enclosed pet exercise area.much better that getting a good soak and blown away on the stern of the pont.yes going to miss the 24 hour crossing but it is Times of going green and protecting the environment so be it.stay safe

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We ( not pet owners) commented on the Galicia's dog exercise area and wonder how many dogs will be left dangling by their leads as they go under the rather high barrier.  We remember coming back from Spain on the Amorique once when the scheduled boat broke down. We stopped off at Roscoff and while there pet owners could exercise dogs on deck. A rather inquisitive German Shepherd got his head stuck in one of the whatever-you-call-the big-steel-circular-things-where -the ropes-go-into. 

 

Many thanks to all concerned with the presentation. We did enjoy it,and hope that we have more luck travelling on her next year.

Edited by Cassie
spelling mistake
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6 minutes ago, Cassie said:

We ( not pet owners) commented on the Galicia's dog exercise area and wonder how many dogs will be left dangling by their leads as they go under the rather high barrier.  We remember coming back from Spain on the Amorique once when the scheduled boat broke down. We stopped off at Roscoff and while there pet owners could exercise dogs on deck. A rather inquisitive German Shepherd got his head stuck in one of the whatever-you-call-the big-steel-circular-things-where -the ropes-go-into. 

 

Many thanks to all concerned with the presentation. We did enjoy it,and hope that we have more luck travelling on her next year.

I did not notice that,can you point me on the right direction please,many thanks.stay safe

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There is a short bit that refers to the “ dog exercise area” and shows an ordinary deck with ordinary rails. We thought that these should be reinforced as I can just see dogs on leads getting under the lower rail and falling off the deck.

No time to watch it again now so can’t tell you exactly where it was in the film.

The Armorique was not equipped to do the long Spanish route with pets and they all had to stay in owner’s vehicles and be allowed out under supervision, a very few times during the 2 night trip. I dread to think what some vehicles were like afterwards and we saw one dog who was a trembling wreck.

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1 hour ago, colin said:

The C Club lounge takes up a pretty big area. Clearly expected to be a major feature?

Yep I saw that too, nearly as big as Bretagne's self service. If you purchase a Pullman seat and C Club entry which has free food and drink it's a cheap way to sail to Spain.

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2 hours ago, jonno said:

Steve at niferry has produced another Galicia page which also includes deckplans & cabin numbers.

https://www.niferry.co.uk/introducing-brittany-ferries-galicia-with-deck-plans/

The deckplans answer a couple of cabin-related queries:

  • Whilst most cabin numbers are three-digits long, there are four-digit long cabin numbers at the rear (like I assumed). The reason being that the numbering exceeds the allocation. (i.e. Deck 8 has 801-894 and 8101-8142)
  • Freight-driver cabins explain why the windows to the rear of Deck 8 were so close together

I am a little disappointed by the bar. Looks a small space next to the lifeboats with limited possibility of live entertainment. Personally, I would not have bothered with the C-Club lounge and instead put the bar here with the existing bar area used as a cafe, or a second bar (like the Cap Finistere bar amidships) and consequently moved the reclining seats to the reading lounge spaces behind it. But what do I know? Hopefully, it will work. I do wonder whether the inclusion of the C-Club lounge was a Stena influence or that it couldn't really be changed, since it is not a feature of any other vessel (albeit the Commodore lounge on PA but that's quite small). 

Edited by georgem7
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It's pleasing to see that the ramp up to the upper parking decks looks wider than the CF one.  Going up that in a motorhome when the ramp is wet and slippery, you have inches of clearance and you are stopped half way up is a stressful way to start a winter away in Spain ! 

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3 minutes ago, Cassie said:

It's pleasing to see that the ramp up to the upper parking decks looks wider than the CF one.  Going up that in a motorhome when the ramp is wet and slippery, you have inches of clearance and you are stopped half way up is a stressful way to start a winter away in Spain ! 

Very true, wheel spun a few times as the auto Ducato's don't have hill hold. The new Transit does and the difference was noticeable back in July.

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1 hour ago, Cassie said:

There is a short bit that refers to the “ dog exercise area” and shows an ordinary deck with ordinary rails. We thought that these should be reinforced as I can just see dogs on leads getting under the lower rail and falling off the deck.

No time to watch it again now so can’t tell you exactly where it was in the film.

The Armorique was not equipped to do the long Spanish route with pets and they all had to stay in owner’s vehicles and be allowed out under supervision, a very few times during the 2 night trip. I dread to think what some vehicles were like afterwards and we saw one dog who was a trembling wreck.

Thank you a very good point,we are lucky that way because our dog is a very big but I see what mean ,I know some people do let there dogs off the lead and sometimes they may slip the lead or collar or panic and pull the leader out of people's hand.if nobody else has noticed this to me be a good idea just to let do know your observation of the railing ie a safety issue people with pets to bf.stay safe

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15 hours ago, colin said:

I'm with you on this, but what do I know ....?

Vastly different in so many ways from Pride of Bilbao with a ship full of drunks, or the other offerings mentioned above. I see a bright future for this policy, these services and these 3 ships.

Excuse me I was one of them drunks and had many good times on her.i cannot remember what we got up to but it is just haze now.iam much more civilised now.i think you call it old age.stay safe

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5 hours ago, Gareth said:

Yes, there seems to be a lot of variability in the three 1-night crossings.  The longest, as you say, is over 30 hours, and the shortest is around 27 hours.  The middle one is just over 28 hours.  No idea why they are not all the same.

I was tolled by BF the reason for the longer crossings was the boat is slower!!!  and it will spend more time in port due to  increased freight capacity. How the latter increases crossing time I am not sure

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6 hours ago, David Williams said:

Yes beats BF off the presses, looks like it was collated using stuff that BF published, the video plus the Stena layouts !

The plans came direct from Brittany Ferries themselves actually 🙄.  Hence the acknowledgment at the bottom of the article and the credit on each image!  Perhaps they will change some colours to make them similar to the rest of the fleet, but the plans are the real deal and not just something I made myself!

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All this conjecture regarding crossing times is quite amusing really. BF have specifically bought an economical ship for good reason. And they will run it economically. Remember, the Galacia is some 20,000kW less in power than the Cap Finistère.

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