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Galicia - Storm Bella


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No clear signs of any damage to Galicia today. There's possibly a slight scuff halfway up the white on the port stern corner, and maybe where the transom joins the main structure and belting.  

In which case you wouldn't need an anchor then! The anchor and chain work together to absorb loading by the anchored vessel and it's obviously best if the sresses are all in a straight line if po

Older ships would not have had Chinese ropes mooring them. Remember it's also made of Chinese Steel😞 

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Would they have run say the port screw astern to help minimise the effects of the wind and those stern lines?  My mate on the ship/s at anchor he crews on have been constantly turning screws whilst at anchor in different wind and tide conditions to keep the stern in preferred aspect to bow/anchor.  Indeed he sad the QM2 often goes astern in a strong Gale to keep the anchor held in same position and no chain snatching. Which went against my limited knowledge as I would have assumed they want less drag on the anchor with wind and engine both pulling in same direction.  But apparently this can help in these circumstances.  

Edited by 5_ShortBlasts
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5 minutes ago, cvabishop said:

I suspect the reason is that it is best to keep the pressure directly on the anchor to assist it to dig in. If the pull is off to one side there is a risk of wrenching it out sideways,

But surely it's the weight of the chain that is holding the ship in place and not the hope that the anchor is wedged between two rocks or embedded in the sand etc.

Ed

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But surely it's the weight of the chain that is holding the ship in place and not the hope that the anchor is wedged between two rocks or embedded in the sand etc.

In which case you wouldn't need an anchor then!

The anchor and chain work together to absorb loading by the anchored vessel and it's obviously best if the sresses are all in a straight line if possible although  if the ship swings with the tide it all gets a bit more complicated. Quite well explained here:

https://www.pbo.co.uk/seamanship/anchoring-6-tips-for-tricky-situations-21085

 

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Thats always assummg that at the time she `popped` hands were at stations both on deck and in the engine room. If not the anchor would have gone down a bit later and as a means of stopping her drifting until the tugs could take control. We`ll have to await the MAIB report for the full details.

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1 hour ago, Cabin-boy said:

But surely it's the weight of the chain that is holding the ship in place and not the hope that the anchor is wedged between two rocks or embedded in the sand etc.

Ed

Well, the numpties decide where they want to anchor, put their bow there and let loose .... The experienced choose their location, steam into the prevailing wind or tide past said location, then start to reverse, let the anchor go, and continue slowly astern once the anchor hits bottom, paying the chain out steadily, until, like magic, the vessel pulls on her set anchor with her sitting smack bang where she should be.

Please note - there are multiple complications in the above procedure .....

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5 minutes ago, Gareth said:

Yes, I’ve been struggling to understand what the relevance of the discussion about anchoring is to Galicia’s incident.

I think we drifted off topic (but not quite as far as Galicia!) into a parallel discussion. 

However in the original images Tony posted it does look like her bow is further from the linkspan than it would be if the lines were still attached and Tony stated that she 'broke free' suggesting that all the lines snapped. In that case, if she had no power to manoeuvre, then dropping one or both anchors might have been the only option. 

Ed

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25 minutes ago, Cabin-boy said:

However in the original images Tony posted it does look like her bow is further from the linkspan than it would be if the lines were still attached and Tony stated that she 'broke free' suggesting that all the lines snapped. In that case, if she had no power to manoeuvre, then dropping one or both anchors might have been the only option. 

Ed

Well, even if the bow had broken free, dropping the hook would have been next to useless in that sort of confined space.  As Colin says, the chain has to be stretched out a long way for the anchor to work properly.  However, it’s academic because the bow remained attached to the shore.

I suspect the effect you see in Tony’s images are to do with the fact that Galicia’s AIS has not quite been set up correctly.  She always looks off-set when alongside, and I think it’s because the AIS is programmed to think that the receiver is on the port side whereas in fact it’s on the centreline.

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