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Pandemic Scrappings


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Nothing to do with the Pont. But saw this video on YouTube.

such a waste to scrap this one - but the only reason was because of covid. It was cheaper to scrap it then to keep it.

enjoy the video 

 

 

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Sad indeed, even sadder that we have lost Marco Polo this year, I actually can't bear to look at the photos of her in Alang. How many of the former CMV fleet have actually survived? As far as I know it is only Vasco da Gama and Astoria, I've not heard much about the latter vessel recently but I'd have thought she's highly likely to end up on a beach somewhere soon? 

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When the cruise industry recommences services there will be no room for the niche ships that many people valued. They will have gone to the scrapyard prematurely with all their well loved individual characteristics.

In future there will just be the standardised megaships differing only in their internal redecorations. Basically just all inclusive resorts afloat. Such is progress.

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Ah but the big ugly ones can't use the Corinth canal which is a must when on a Greek island cruise.

True, but I just love those submerged bridges that rise from the bottom of the canal at the ends. We detoured to cross them on more than one occasion en route from Athens to the Peloponnese. There is an adjacent taverna from where you can watch the bridge in action.

 

 

Corinth Bridge (2).jpg

Corinth Bridge (3).jpg

Edited by cvabishop
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3 hours ago, cvabishop said:

When the cruise industry recommences services there will be no room for the niche ships that many people valued. They will have gone to the scrapyard prematurely with all their well loved individual characteristics.

In future there will just be the standardised megaships differing only in their internal redecorations. Basically just all inclusive resorts afloat. Such is progress.

I think there will still be niche operators. In fact, as the modern cruise industry matures - fragmentation will be inevitable.  

Just two weeks ago, the cruise division of NYK signed off on a new build for 744 passengers with Meyer Werft.

In 20 years time - could their ship (the Asuka II) garner the same following as the Marco Polo - possibly.

Life moves on, so do ships.

https://www.cruiseandferry.net/articles/nyk-cruises-orders-luxury-ship-from-meyer-werft

 

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11 hours ago, zuludelta said:

I think there will still be niche operators. In fact, as the modern cruise industry matures - fragmentation will be inevitable.  

Just two weeks ago, the cruise division of NYK signed off on a new build for 744 passengers with Meyer Werft.

In 20 years time - could their ship (the Asuka II) garner the same following as the Marco Polo - possibly.

Life moves on, so do ships.

https://www.cruiseandferry.net/articles/nyk-cruises-orders-luxury-ship-from-meyer-werft

 

Yes very true. I couldn't help but compare the fate of 'classic' ships such as Marco Polo with other forms of transport once they reach the end of their working days. Whether it is cars, trains or even aircraft in some cases, examples of a similar vintage would generally be preserved these days but of course it is a very different proposition with a ship - what do you do with them? Nevertheless to see such graceful ships meet such an indignified end is pretty heartbreaking. 

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If its any consolation the CMV ships were all in a pretty poor state, according to their latest surveys. The Columbus was running with 2 generators permanently out of action due to age/repair and others had very thin hulls. Although they had spent millions on them it wasn`t enough. I think a lot of the time they were held together by a willing crew. Even without Covid a lot of these iconic but elderly ships would have ended up in the scrappers. The Queen Mary, probably the most iconic of all has, rightly, been preserved for decades, but now it looks like the money is running out..I shudder to think what might happen there.

Time is always against us sadly..

Edited by Paully
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A few years ago I stayed on the SS Rotterdam which is now a floating hotel in her home city, I wrote a trip review on here at the time. I seem to recall those working to preserve her had to battle for some years to raise the finance, and it was 'touch and go' for some time. They were in the process of renovating certain parts of the ship, but nontheless it was a fantastic experience to stay aboard her, and the optional full tour of the ship is well worth doing. There is a real sense of stepping back to a more glamorous, by-gone era walking around the ship which personally I just loved. 

Edited by Ryan_H
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9 minutes ago, PGTV said:

Hours of fun

From my experience over the last 12 months, the only thing that having a pool gives you is hours of cleaning. But those do look good. Are they French-flagged?

Ed

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2 hours ago, Cabin-boy said:

From my experience over the last 12 months, the only thing that having a pool gives you is hours of cleaning. But those do look good. Are they French-flagged?

Ed

Maybe thats the one operating Southampton to Le Havre then 😁

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  • 4 weeks later...
20 minutes ago, Ryan_H said:

Wasn't entirely sure where to post this but thought it was interesting and essentially seems to be someone bucking the trend by putting an older cruise ship back in service rather than scrapping it:

https://www.cruiseandferry.net/articles/new-ambassador-cruise-line-launches-in-uk

 

That I think might be the problem Ryan..Its CMV Mk2..Most of the seniors are ex CMV and the ship they are using is similar vintage to the last lot presently on the beach and they were in a dire state by all accounts. I`m not sure the actual state of the market in crusing right now. Seems a very big gamble..

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Posted (edited)
20 minutes ago, Paully said:

That I think might be the problem Ryan..Its CMV Mk2..Most of the seniors are ex CMV and the ship they are using is similar vintage to the last lot presently on the beach and they were in a dire state by all accounts. I`m not sure the actual state of the market in crusing right now. Seems a very big gamble..

It is clearly targeted at those that like smaller ships, however whilst the 50+ market of a couple of decades ago might like them, I am not so sure that a ship with 22% Balconies will appeal to the current crop of 50+.

I personally like medium size modern cruise ships or small expedition type ships with Zodiacs for shore landings.

Edited by David Williams
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From the article:

"Ambience, which is designed to carry approximately 1,400 guests in 798 cabins, 23 per cent of which will have balconies"

This means, based on my calculations, that 183.54 cabins have balconies. Do you think this is for single-occupancy (but for the slightly fatter than average passenger) or a mistake?

Ed

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Posted (edited)

Although ships are judged on the proportion of balcony cabins as 'must haves' I personally think they can be overrated. When the ship is at sea they can be too windy to use or the sun might be on the other side of the vessel. They can be pretty cold if you are on a high latitude  cruise, particularly Alaska for example. They also have a restricted view so you might miss something happening on the other side of the ship.

There are usually much better and more comfortable places to relax such as forward facing lounges with panoramic views and comfy chairs or aft sun decks looking over the stern (not always the latter unfortunately) in both cases featuring attentive stewards bringing you exotic drinks while you deplete your on board spend. You can move around the ship to catch the sun or admire passing whales too.

CMV ships were older vessels and usually didn't feature many balconies but they were still very popular with a good range of facilities, over 50s don't really miss climbing walls and water chutes etc.

Balconies can be nice to sit out on for short periods when the conditions are right but the main shipboard facilities are usually more tempting.

When you look at close up photos of cruise ships either at sea or in port you see hardly any people actually on the balconies.

A decent window is enough for us - and a heck of a lot cheaper too. On QM2 we had one of the hull cabins just ahead of the 'protected balcony' cabins. Our cabin was actually larger as the balcony space was incorporated into the cabin itself.

 

Edited by cvabishop
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Posted (edited)

I very much agree with the above, I can't necessarily see as a balcony cabin is always worth having. I suppose it depends on the cruise you are on, the destinations, time of year etc. But for a great many cruises ex UK, I would be perfectly happy with a decent outside cabin, or as good as I could afford. I had a balcony cabin once on the Ventura, overlooking the stern, and it was great to have as a means of waking you up in the morning, but other than that, was of very limited use most of the time; we were sailing to Northern Spain and Portugal, and even in Summer, the wind is generally 'brisk' in those waters in my experience.

More 'traditional' ships do not only appeal to the over 50s - I'm under 40 and am not particularly interested in the floating resorts. At the same time though I can well understand why the majority of the target audience are in the older demographics, but that certainly doesn't put me off. I've been looking at Fred Olsen's Balmoral for next year, especially as she appears to be based at Newcastle for much of the year. 

Edited by Ryan_H
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34 minutes ago, cvabishop said:

They can be pretty cold if you are on a high latitude  cruise, particularly Alaska for example

Individual taste, I like privacy and Fresh air. I have done Norway in December and also Alaska (in Summer) on cruises & made full use of the balcony. The day cruising Glacier Bay with a Park Ranger giving a commentary was Magical on our Balcony (admittedly we had a large Balcony !). I have booked a Balcony on the PA this year (fingers crossed).

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Individual taste, I like privacy and Fresh air.

Yes, of course. I think some people expect too much though. I have seen moans on a cruising forum from people who booked a balcony cabin on QM transatlantic crossings and were unable to use it. You have to weigh up the cost compared with the personal benefit you hope to derive from it.

When we visited the Hubbard Glacier (in Summer), the ship nosed in and backed out so if you had stayed on your balcony you would have missed all the action with ice falling from the glacier face! We did use ours a bit but it was simply too cold to sit out on when cruising the Inside Passage although we did admire the view.

 

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