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8 minutes ago, spancophile said:

I shall certainly buy one then and happily drive off into my fossil fuel sunset.

And I shall try to remain ahead of you so as not to be in the cloud of fumes emanating from your vehicle. ūüėā

Ed

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37 minutes ago, spancophile said:

Couldn't agree more.Our preferred holidays of touring in France and Spain are completely impractical in an electric vehicle.At my present advanced age of 75 I can honestly say I have no intention of ever owning one.I predict massive sales of Petrol/Diesel vehicles in 2029.I shall certainly buy one then and happily drive off into my fossil fuel sunset.

Couldn't agree less!  We tour and might do 200 - 300 miles on a typical day. We nearly always stop for a leisurely pcinic or lunch.  That's completely compatible with EV ownership.

The only thing stopping us is price and the fact that we lug around the best part of 2 tonnes of caravan, which rather limits options and range. Both of these factors will change though.

People are already benig very cautious about buying big diesels, even those who need them for towing duties. I've seen discussion recently where someone really wants a Range Rover or Disco diesel but, with one eye on residuals was looking for sometihng cheaper instead.  I think there'll only be a very small market for large ICE vehicles, long before 2029. I expect it will be dominated by Ssang Yong or similar - i.e. a lower budget, big but cheap maker.

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3 minutes ago, VikingVoyager said:

I've seen discussion recently where someone really wants a Range Rover or Disco diesel but, with one eye on residuals was looking for something cheaper instead.

Residuals are already falling massively for ICE vehicles, where as good BEVs are having residuals in 80 to 95% mark after several years. Compare that to the third off the price rule when you drive off an ICE off the forecourt.

Several financial institutions are now looking at BEVs as an investment rather than the always heavily depreciating cars, especially for those that can get better with OTA (Over The Air) software updates. Imagine coming down to your ICE car to find the manufacturer had added 5% more efficiency / range or additional safety features for free overnight. Oh, that is BEV's only, yes it has happened to us several times, and is why Teslas etc can have 95% residual value after several years as they keep improving.

There are plenty of barriers to BEVs at the moment like the initial price, but they are coming down one by one. If China start importing their sub £10k and sub £20k good quality cars, then there will be a wave of change.

It is also thought that several of the current major brands will shrink massively, with several slated to do a British Leyland and and disappear as they cannot keep up with the changing market and different modus operandi for EVs. Big brands too, BMW and Mercedes are in the danger zone, along with other traditional European manufacturers. Some, like the many tentacled VW group will drop brands and amalgamate to adapt, although they will have to try harder as their ID3 and ID4 are not rated as good cars compared to other EVs, but of all the traditional European manufacturers they are probably making the most effort.

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31 minutes ago, VikingVoyager said:

Couldn't agree less!  We tour and might do 200 - 300 miles on a typical day. We nearly always stop for a leisurely pcinic or lunch.  That's completely compatible with EV ownership.

 

Just pondering the delights of a picnic at a charging point.I could munch on lentils and go and hug a tree afterwards.

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2 minutes ago, spancophile said:

Just pondering the delights of a picnic at a charging point.I could munch on lentils and go and hug a tree afterwards.

Perhaps you aren't familiar with French Aires if you are on main roads or charming small towns if you feel like diverting from your route? Where do you stop to refuel your body and stretch your legs?

Lentils can be nice in a salad, I suppose, and if you want to interact with nature romantically, I'm sure you can if it's legal.

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1 hour ago, spancophile said:

Couldn't agree more.Our preferred holidays of touring in France and Spain are completely impractical in an electric vehicle.At my present advanced age of 75 I can honestly say I have no intention of ever owning one.I predict massive sales of Petrol/Diesel vehicles in 2029.I shall certainly buy one then and happily drive off into my fossil fuel sunset.

On Wednesday I will be 5 years older than your goodself. Currently in good condition for age and mileage but a few creaks in the suspension so¬†I just hope that my first (and oly) EV¬†won't be a mobility scooter!¬†ūüėĄūüĎ®‚Äćūü¶ľ

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