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Electric cars - recharged


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On 09/07/2021 at 11:56, Shipping Forecast said:

 

Thank you.

With BEVs, as someone who has been directly affected by the consequences of air pollution, you may have noticed I talk about pollution not carbon etc (carbon reduction usually follows pollution reduction anyway), BEVs of all types are a high profile method of removing around a third of all pollution out of everyone's lives with the consequent improvement in health for all. Then there is ability to use zero emission generation including nuclear to further reduce the pollution effects.

Also, and this may surprise some, crude oil is a precious limited resource that needs to be preserved where ever possible so it's many benefits in all use cases are there for many generations to come. Oil should not be squandered by burning it needlessly in running to the shops, the kids around etc when there are alternatives.

I understand what you mean but how much oil is in gallon of petrol/ diesel.always thought these 2 fuels were one of the last bye products after many other things used out of oil.stay safe

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1 hour ago, nodwad said:

I understand what you mean but how much oil is in gallon of petrol/ diesel.always thought these 2 fuels were one of the last bye products after many other things used out of oil.stay safe

I thought the last thing out of the barrel was residual fuel oil (HFO) like what ships used to use on the high seas. The sort of stuff that needs heating up or sawing into logs.

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Just now, veryoldbear said:

I thought the last thing out of the barrel was residual fuel oil (HFO) like what ships used to use on the high seas. The sort of stuff that needs heating up or sawing into logs.

No, the last bit out of the barrel is what car salesmen put on their hair.

Ed

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5 hours ago, nodwad said:

I understand what you mean but how much oil is in gallon of petrol/ diesel.always thought these 2 fuels were one of the last bye products after many other things used out of oil.

The overwhelming reason for extracting crude oil is to fuel the transport industry with petrol, diesel and kerosene making up a very large percentage of that. Everything else is the extra (bonus?) depending on which crude is used and how it is refined.

The how much part is a bit of a piece of string question.

Hydrocarbons as a fuel source cover a wide range of energy sources. At the top end of the grade scale you have the gases (methane, ethane etc) followed by petrol, naphtha (mainly for chemical production), kerosene and diesel in the middle, then marine fuels to bitumen residue (solid hydrocarbons at standard temperatures) at the bottom. Some of the lighter products like methane are thought of as a nuisance so just burnt off and not even utilised even though they have some intrinsic value. 

Hydrocarbons make 97/98% of crude oil, so at it crudest you need 1.02/1.03 gallons of the correct crude fraction / grade to make one gallon of petrol, diesel etc. However it is not quite that simple as crude oil is not a consistent product. Each oil field location has a specific combination of the hydrocarbon grades above making the oil more or less desirable. So you get a combination of

Light, Medium  and Heavy crude - Light crude consists mainly of the lighter fractions of hydrocarbons (gases, petrol) worth more money, whereas heavy crude has more of the sticky, very viscous hydrocarbons (marine fuel oil, bitumen) requiring more processing so has a lower price. Medium is between the two!

and 

Sweet and Sour crude - Sweet crude has a low sulphur content and requires less refining and gets the highest prices. Sour crude has more sulphur and other contaminates in. The name comes form when they used to taste the oil in the initial production to determine the quality. For example, North Sea Brent is a light sweet crude oil, whereas the Canada's WCS crude is heavy sour.

Therefore the important question is what is the percentage of each hydrocarbon grade in the crude oil from each field and how much processing does it require? This then sets the basic price structure before the oil traders get involved. Obviously due to the much higher demand for petrol, kerosene and diesel the lighter crudes like Saudi and North Sea crude are the most in demand and has a higher price than the heavy sour crude found in bituminous oil sands of Canada and Venezuela.

To help meet demand for the more popular products - petrol, kerosene, diesel - and as the demand for the denser hydrocarbons products is lower, the refineries also crack, or break up the heavier oils, to produce the high demand, higher price lighter hydrocarbons. This makes these products more expensive as extra processing is needed so avoided where possible.

Bunker fuels are at the bottom of the pile just above carbon black / bitumen residue and these are the real less wanted extras. They also tend to be the sourer products with more contaminants in, hence not so good for the environment. But they are cheap compared to the higher priced lighter hydrocarbons so out of sight, out of mind. 

Gaseous hydrocarbons or natural gas (superb greenwashing there) tend to come from separate gas fields like those in the southern North Sea as they require little processing apart from removing contaminants and water from the gas to produce dry natural gas for use. Gas from separate gas fields is better quality than the gas from crude oil reservoirs.

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8 hours ago, nodwad said:

I understand what you mean but how much oil is in gallon of petrol/ diesel.always thought these 2 fuels were one of the last bye products after many other things used out of oil.stay safe

Fractional Distillation from school chemistry Curtesy BBC

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I found out a bit more about the Tour de France vehicles today. The six stages which aren't using the full electric Skoda are those in the high mountains (Alps and Pyrenees). Obviously it's not a question of oxygen levels as there is no fuel to burn with electric so I wonder what the reason is. Either the range which is curtailed by the repetitive climbs (but that should be partially clawed by back by the regen systems on the downhill stretches) or something to do with overheating whereby the thinner air doesn't cool the batteries as efficiently. Does anyone have any other theories?

Ed  

 

 

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Yes, and as soon as something is posted the situation changes. It's difficult to keep up. Plus, depending on a third party website for advice is advisory at best and may not accord with what is actually happening.

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8 minutes ago, cvabishop said:

Yes, and as soon as something is posted the situation changes. It's difficult to keep up. Plus, depending on a third party website for advice is advisory at best and may not accord with what is actually happening.

Exactly, which is why hearing from French Residents or those who have crossed a border recently is helpful.

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Helpful, but by no means definitive in the current situation. (plus the rules 'seem' to be open to local interpretation in many cases.) It is a moving feast really and dependent on personal status and reasons for travel.

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For many the reality of ferry travel is a distant memory and dream. From being a relatively frequent traveller to not being on board for 18 months feels strange, and it is looking like it could be 2 years before gracing a linkspan again. For those who last travelled in the summer of 2019 it could easily be three years before boarding once more.

Some of the ships we love and those we love a little less have been vacationing on the canals and quaysides for a similar amount of time, becoming silent memorials to a bygone age of free travel filled with joie de vivre, bread rolls and man's best friend.

There are a lucky few who can travel or travel for work, but most of us are still in the terminal waiting to for permission board for our next travel adventure. Some have given up and gone home, some are snoozing in the quiet corner, a few reading or away with their own thoughts as life intrudes, while rest make small talk which as time goes on drifts slightly to keep the conversation flowing. 

When that clarion call from above allowing us to board, to continue our travels freely again unencumbered by an acronym salad of bank depleting tests, we will be ready for plenty of good ferry rapport reporting, retorting and reimporting items to avoid the tax.

Edited by Shipping Forecast
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As one who has moaned about BF but has continued to support / use them in 2020 and 2021 I welcome tips about Covid testing, entry requirements and customs. If you have no intention to travel I can appreciate it may get a bit boring. I find discussions about which end of the ferry goes in first tedious. As far as electric cars are concerned no real harm and most will find some interesting information. 

I make up my own mind If a topic is no interest to me I don't read it.  These items are on top of Topics about Ferries not instead of. Any way living near Leicester first hand experience of anything to do with shipping is not easy.

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  • 3 months later...

A quick update on life with an electric car.

By the end of August the effective range, which had started out at 210 kms, was up to 224 kms. This was due to the mild weather, limited use of the aircon (as it wasn’t that hot) and a lot of driving around towns and local roads. This continued through early September but by the third week had started to drop off as the temperature fell. This morning we had a low of 2 degrees and the range, when fully charged, was just under 200 kms. That’s not a problems as I can charge each night if necessary or during the day when visiting certain customers. I get the impression that the range is the polar opposite of an ICE vehicle. With petrol or diesel your range decreases in the summer due to the extra fuel required to run the air-con while in winter the latent engine heat is captured to warm the cabin and clear the windows. In an electric car the air-con in the summer uses very little energy as it’s a heat-pump but in winter needs more power to overcome the lack of a constant heat source. It does however demist the windows in seconds - almost like turning on a large hairdryer.

Other than that, life is easy. Plugging in each day and/or night takes a minute or two, most of which involves untangling the cable. Totted up this might be slightly longer than a fill up at the pumps but doesn’t involve any diversions or queuing so saves time overall. The price of diesel has just hit an all time high here in France and petrol is very expensive too so not having to pay for that is a bonus.

Overtaking slow moving vehicles, and the wine harvest is underway here, is extremely easy and fluid. I managed to drive over 20kms on local roads the other day without once touching the brakes and just using the regenerative system (controlled by paddles) and anticipating the roundabouts etc. This will I hope mean the brake pads last longer and it also helps keep the range up.

On the negative side, I’ve nearly run over a lot of dozy people who cross the road without looking and assuming that because they can’t hear a car there isn’t one coming. One of my would-be victims is an elderly lady who is now on her third fright (she crosses over to her garden to feed her goat!) and whose facial expression is a mixture of fear, wonderment and hatred.

Ed

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