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Brittany Ferries explore 'flying ferries' concept.....


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14 hours ago, cvabishop said:

OK if they are unobtrusive replacements but round here we seem to have lots of prominent black panels overlaid on red roof tiles. Not a pretty look.

Whenever I see solar panels on houses i think to myself of the CO2 outputs that they represent. I find them very attractive.

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My preferred form of air transport between Miami or Fort Liquordale and Nassau back in the days when I raced over there each winter. Chalks International Airlines. "Once airborne, we will be serving complimentary drinks, weather permitting" .... Clearly not if it was raining.

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23 hours ago, wortley said:

They don’t have to load or land on the water.

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The Lydd - Le Touquet car ferry. I was once doing a photographic assignment of the cars loading onto a plane. I was escorted onto the runway by the airport manager. After I'd finished shooting I asked him if there was anywhere decent nearby to get lunch. He then opened the door of the nearby plane and treated me to lunch at the airport in France.

 

No tickets, no passport, no immigration. (and no PCR test)

 

I am old enough to have seen flying boats take off from Southampton bound for South Africa.

Edited by BobCrox
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5 minutes ago, BobCrox said:

No tickets, no passport, no immigration. (and no PCR test)

And if the weather had turned bad, no way home! 😂

Has anyone else ever gone into another country just for lunch and then come straight back again?

I spent around 5 hours in Tijuana (Mexico) on a bus trip from the USA which gave us a chance to browse the market and have lunch but that might not count. And the old P&O high speed ferry did once get me across to Cherbourg for lunch with a friend in St Vaast La Houge and back again in the evening. But again it was more than just a simple lunch trip as I had plenty of time to visit Auchan before the return ferry.

Ed

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Quote

I spent around 5 hours in Tijuana (Mexico) on a bus trip from the USA which gave us a chance to browse the market and have lunch but that might not count.

We did that, using the tram from San Diego. The date was September 11th 2001.

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8 minutes ago, Cabin-boy said:

Has anyone else ever gone into another country just for lunch and then come straight back again?

Once went on a day trip to France from Deal.

Once went to Macao to taste General's Chicken. Didn't read the weather forecast and was stranded for several days.

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Many years ago my company was a regional distributor for a well known Italian electrical appliance manufacturer.They flew all their distributors in private aircraft from Southampton to Le Havre to visit their new distribution centre.A short visit to the warehouse was followed by a very long boozy lunch at Le Havre Yacht Club and then back to Southampton.

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2 hours ago, Cabin-boy said:

Has anyone else ever gone into another country just for lunch and then come straight back again?

Flew from Fort Liquordale to Bimini for lunch once. Skipper of maxi racing yacht had his own plane .... He was corporate executive vice president of the owner's business as well. Nice lunch.

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What is the backup for loss of power, batteries need charging from a land source or possibly solar panels which could be built into the upper structure; even so some means of back up will probably be needed? Is it stocked with oars to be given out to the passengers? I assume it will not carry life-rafts'.

Like others have said I think this is some years down the road, I suspect I will have gone up the chimney in smoke before this concept becomes reality and my diesel engine motorhome will be in a museum ( or scrapheap). How long did it take to develop the hovercraft to an operational size and capability? That has not lasted because of the problems with fuel economy and the 'skirt' getting damaged very easily.

Even the famed LNG ships are a long time in arriving, I do not think the ex-Honfleur will be operating on an enviromentally fuel once it goes into service; in fact is the LNG equipment still on the vessel?

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3 hours ago, Barry Thomas said:

What is the backup for loss of power, batteries need charging from a land source or possibly solar panels which could be built into the upper structure; even so some means of back up will probably be needed? Is it stocked with oars to be given out to the passengers? I assume it will not carry life-rafts'.

Expected in service by 2025. The first prototype is being built, scheduled end of this year for testing in winter weather.

The technology used has already been demonstrated and proven with craft like the Lilium for battery storage / propulsion (see https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mjAJWrraTKs to see in action) or Pipistrel, and concept (Widgetworks Airfish 8 etc), all Regent are doing is combining them. 

I am not sure why generally there is such doubt over the range and need for backups. The technologies are very reliable, certainly more reliable than the thousands of parts in a marine diesel, and use a battery big enough to complete the task, all of which happens now and easily be calculated for.

Solar cells on the upper wing surface will not generate enough power to do much apart from power the (some) in-cabin equipment. Batteries could be charged in situ while docked using plug and cable, or as some manufacturers like Pipistrel do, offer the ability to battery swap for fast turn arounds (Pipistrel https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WiADDbeFanU for example from 2015).

The real question is not can it be built and will it work, rather what is the viable use case / market for BF?

Also by then e-VTOLs like the Lilium, the Archer Maker, Vertical Aerospace etc will have launched with similar ranges / speeds, taking off from small landing pads, so what competitive advantage does BF using the GEV apart from less rigorous certification requirements due to being a marine craft rather than an aircraft?

 

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On 16/06/2021 at 12:29, Shipping Forecast said:

These craft have a hydrofoil to start the voyage / flight (?) with which unsticks them from the water. They will take off in highly charted waters with comprehensive weather forecasts, so the likely hold of hitting anything will be practically zero. Agree, sea state will be the limiting factor, but we don't have the tech specs yet to see how limited.

Aren't they only a few metres above water at full height? So they would or could hit obstacles.

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9 minutes ago, Nick Hyde said:

Aren't they only a few metres above water at full height? So they would or could hit obstacles.

It is a matter of probability, just like when flying it is certainly possible to hit objects, but highly unlikely. This probability then reduces with additional measures like wave height radar, ML camera software etc. 

The leading edges could be strengthened against impact to reduce / prevent damage, although as it is a high wing version, the chances of impact are lessened further compared to low wing versions like the Airfish. Not done the calculations, but high speed water craft would have a higher probability of hitting something than these surface skimming craft.

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And with a left brain moment talking of protection, the Airfish reminds me of the Snowspeeders on Hoth, so if you have contacts in a galaxy far far away you could always add a couple of heavy laser cannons to further enhance collision avoidance. You would have no problems getting passengers then to ride on a Hothian Airfish especially if R2-D2 did inflight service - marketing opportunity?

Maybe BF picked the wrong model.

Edited by Shipping Forecast
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12 hours ago, Shipping Forecast said:

Expected in service by 2025. The first prototype is being built, scheduled end of this year for testing in winter weather.

Had a chat with Ed Alsford. The prototype is a scaled down product. First flight of a full size - yes full size - 12 seater is planned for 2023. These will hopefully, or dare I say, theoretically go into production during 2024/25. A 50 seater is 'a long term plan'. That's as much as he'd commit to say.

They're a great idea but having the chat I think they're more about limited capacity Caribbean island hopping and short connections to the Keys for the rich and shameless.

Let's not get excited about nipping to Cherbourg just yet. We need improved woven composites as the airframes need to be a lot lighter. Surface engineered tape casting is still in the lab and to a lesser extent so too is micro-pyramid pore structure morphology. We need these to be mainstream before we can consider 180 passengers or you'll need a wingspan similar to a 787 Dreamliner as currently the 50 seater will need one the same size as a Boeing 737-600.

 

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On 17/06/2021 at 10:07, VikingVoyager said:

Whenever I see solar panels on houses i think to myself of the CO2 outputs that they represent. I find them very attractive.

All of the houses on our small estate had 6 fitted during the build stage as standard, all part of the house price and eco standard they had to build them to. These houses don't lose heat and all have an 'A' EPC cert with around 95 SAP points. If we'd had a EV they'd even fit a wall mounted charger as a cost option. It's why we chose it, oh and the huge driveway we can fit 4 cars and two motorhomes on so we can even it out with our petrol head carbon footprint!

Thinking on... the motorhome is quite green too with two 200Ah lithium batteries, two 160w very thin solar panels & a Victron MPPT and 3kw inverter.

Edited by jonno
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1 minute ago, VikingVoyager said:

They would seem ideal for this.

What about the Isle of Wight too, or is that just too close?

...and a ticket price probably 3 times the price of a ferry.

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44 minutes ago, jonno said:

... A 50 seater is 'a long term plan'. ...

We need improved woven composites as the airframes need to be a lot lighter. Surface engineered tape casting is still in the lab and to a lesser extent so too is micro-pyramid pore structure morphology. ...

Only now are the necessary technologies in development to realise past visions of the future.

Looking out can see slightly larger craft like 20/30 coming to fruition or more likely x passenger + y cargo in the same craft, but above that there are other modes that provide better transport solutions.

23 minutes ago, VikingVoyager said:
43 minutes ago, jonno said:

I think they're more about limited capacity Caribbean island hopping

They would seem ideal for this.

Caribbean is first choice as lots of wealthier clients. Other opportunities around Vancouver / Seattle where there is the world's large concentration of seaplanes, the Great Lakes, Chesapeake Bay (east coast US), Mediterranean / Adriatic Sea, the South East Asia islands are all prime markets.

Widgetworks that makes the Airfish is based out of Singapore and there are other companies developing these like FlyingShip (US - automated cargo initially 1.2 tons), RDC Aqualines (Singapore / Russia - 12 passenger) and CASTED (China - who knows exactly) all with different designs.

IoW too close and better solutions in place.

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