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2 more Chinese newbuilds for St Malo and Ouistreham


colin
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1 hour ago, crechbleiz said:

Given the current situation and as a regular of this route, I am grateful to have at least this ship sailing which actually has more comfortable cabins than the Bretagne. 

I sailed Thursday night from Portsmouth on Armorique and yes I missed the à la carte restaurant but every bit of the crossing was enjoyable. Including the dinner in the self service. I had a pork stew with mushrooms and a cherry clafoutis, all washed down with a half bottle of Chateau Noaillac. Could do worse than that I think. 

Never had a bad meal in Armorique's self service restaurant, sadly I can not say the same for the a la carte in PA, MSM or Normandie over priced silver service outlets.

Edited by colinschandler
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37 minutes ago, colinschandler said:

Never had a bad meal in Armorique's self service restaurant, sadly I can not say the same for the a la carte in PA, MSM or Normandie over priced silver service outlets.

Some things are very good. But ... totally different feeling from sitting being served at you table in a magic setting. And the worst fried eggs. Worse by far than British Rail.

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8 hours ago, Cabin-boy said:

Hence the new Bretagne 2 perhaps having cabin-only accommodation in addition to the bars and catering areas. That way you can book a table for the waiter-service restaurant if you want, maybe in advance. 

Ed

That's annoying. As a single traveller, the cost of a cabin is a lot Compared to the rest of the crossing.

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4 hours ago, The Ferry Man said:

That's annoying. As a single traveller, the cost of a cabin is a lot Compared to the rest of the crossing.

Just an idea. It depends on what the SOLAS regulations Jonno mentioned stipulate with regard to new builds and long crossings.

Ed

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On 23/07/2021 at 18:55, colinschandler said:
On 23/07/2021 at 17:17, jonno said:

The tech is readily available to have purely electrically powered transmissions with the main engines only used as generators

 

The railways realised this in the sixties albeit without the use of batteries.

None of this is new technology. Not only diesel electrics railway locomotives from the sixties, ‘shaftless’ podded propulsion comes from the late 1980s. The first podded cruise ship launched at the end of the nineties with over 100 Azipod (there are other manufacturers available) cruise ships now alone, never mind all the other shipping with podded propulsion installed. Depending on who is doing the figures electrically driven propulsion gives 8 to 15% increase in efficiency while reducing maintenance costs.

All E-Flexers could have been built using this proven technology with four, or even six smaller gen-sets, providing load adjusted efficient running and importantly redundancy, with dual pods and battery support. With design forethought as battery capabilities improve the ability to replace gen-sets with battery banks for longer electric running with the ability for higher power charging, improving efficiency further and most importantly reducing operating costs massively.

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The Battleship USS New Mexico of 1918 had turbo electric drive as did the original Atlantic record breaker Normandie in the 1930s. It was a common method of propulsion between the wars and afterwards although the motors were connected to conventional screws.

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I was thinking more modern flexible propulsion systems but as you say electric propulsion in some form has been around for ages. There is nothing totally new, just things before their time (maybe).

Either electric way would have been a greater step forward.

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2 hours ago, Shipping Forecast said:

None of this is new technology. Not only diesel electrics railway locomotives from the sixties, ‘shaftless’ podded propulsion comes from the late 1980s. The first podded cruise ship launched at the end of the nineties with over 100 Azipod (there are other manufacturers available) cruise ships now alone, never mind all the other shipping with podded propulsion installed. Depending on who is doing the figures electrically driven propulsion gives 8 to 15% increase in efficiency while reducing maintenance costs.

All E-Flexers could have been built using this proven technology with four, or even six smaller gen-sets, providing load adjusted efficient running and importantly redundancy, with dual pods and battery support. With design forethought as battery capabilities improve the ability to replace gen-sets with battery banks for longer electric running with the ability for higher power charging, improving efficiency further and most importantly reducing operating costs massively.

Thanks SF.

For those of us interested in a bit more info ABB have a webpage which illustrates the advantages of Azipod propulsion. Personaly I didn't think they were popular due to the issues Cunard had with QMII.

https://new.abb.com/news/detail/24849/azipodr-m-propulsion-for-ferries-and-ropax-vessels-faster-safer-cleaner

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Yes, podded propulsion went through a sticky patch as power increased and the original design of thrust bearing could not be scaled up due to the eccentric oscillations in the shaft causing them to misalign. Updated thrust bearing designs with roller bearings etc have mitigated the issue.

New designs including rim driven rotors which look more like aircraft engines providing concentrated directional thrust are coming onto the market too. Still early days though.

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1 hour ago, Shipping Forecast said:

Yes, podded propulsion went through a sticky patch as power increased and the original design of thrust bearing could not be scaled up due to the eccentric oscillations in the shaft causing them to misalign. Updated thrust bearing designs with roller bearings etc have mitigated the issue.

New designs including rim driven rotors which look more like aircraft engines providing concentrated directional thrust are coming onto the market too. Still early days though.

Uni mate who's an architect for Knud's has worked with rim propulsors, I think it was for a rig vessel? Aren't they fitted to our new aircraft carriers?

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IIRC they dropped the pods for more of a Turbo Electric arrangement with twin shafts with two motors per shaft, each shaft / propeller able to deliver 50,000 hp (~37MW). This was instead of four 20MW pods.

Also IIRC the two new hydrographic vessels are the first RN ships to feature modern propulsion pods.

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