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Crossing borders.


Penlan
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19 hours ago, Rapido640 said:

Is cheese or pickle now being prohibited from being brought back to the UK? I thought that prohibition only applied when travellers were going from the UK to EU countries.

I have heard that Randox are developing a day two test for cheese. So you should be OK provided the result is negative. They just need to find an MP to lobby the government 🤨

Edited by IanN
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So back to the question. I travelled out Plymouth Roscoff and back late September. Cursory check of the car (driver, no passenger, so maybe the reason why). Asked to open the bonnet and boot where the customs guy in Plymouth asked me what an object was at the back of the boot. It was a breakdown triangle but he didn't ask me to show him. Usual security questions. Nothing in Roscoff apart from request for passport and vaccination certificate. Bought wine from WBS in Roscoff to the limit of 4 cases; in the good old days it would have been about 10. Nobody checked in Plymouth and the customs place was unmanned. So in terms of the process it was just like pre-Brexit. In terms of buying alcohol it felt like going back to the 60s. I didn't even risk taking food/perishables out or back. 

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But there’s no risk in bringing foods or perishables back to the Uk - because there are no restrictions on them. We would never come back without a sack of pink Roscoff onions, two or three pots of pork rillettes and some St Nectaire cheese.

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My professional yacht skipper chum came over as a footie from Portsmouth to inspect a boat – so he was laden with laptop, backpack and wheelie including lifejacket and a full bag of emergency kit – including a sealed container of flares for a potential sea trial. [The boat had been unattended for the best part of a year and there was no inventory available in advance].  Based on previous experience carrying "pyros" he sensibly opted to declare. En route here, he was waved through by the Douane who recognised his business and equipment. On return to the UK a heavily laden foot passenger was obviously regarded as suspicious and he had to unpack. It took him several minutes to explain the flare canister – despite the labelling – and then persuade the Customs officer that she did not need to inflate the lifejacket to be sure it did not contain anything "naughty" !!!

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The dairy and meat issue has always been there as an EU member we were only ever allowed to carry what was for personal consumption anyway. That rule still applies to the remaining 27 members.

I find it ridiculous that you can't take meat or dairy but you can take eggs. Also how are my 2 litres of milk, 500g of Lurpak spreadable & 12 rashers of bacon going to get into the the EU's agricultural food chain... which is supposedly the concern, unless they feed their cattle on a diet of recyclable plastic? 

I mean, Arla haven't suddenly changed their processing machinery, it's the same across all of their European factories. The U.K is just as concerned about swine flu, bird flu & foot & mouth. It was the U.K. that put up the biggest fight against chlorinated chicken after Brussels said it was ok to import back in 1997 and travellers from the EU to the U.K. will happily push a trolley around any supermarket buying and consuming British meat & dairy whilst they're here.

I can go to Morrisons in St Peter in Guernsey buy milk, butter, cheese, sausages & bacon and take it to France even though it's of U.K. origin? It's an absolute load of bollox.

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18 minutes ago, VikingVoyager said:

Just a fair amount of it then.  

Honestly, I’ve no idea.

I’d certainly say 50 years ago the majority of our law was common law, but as governments have become more meddlesome it’s hard to say.

So your ‘most’ may now be right.

I’ll do some googling to try and find out.

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Just now, nick hall said:

Honestly, I’ve no idea.

I’d certainly say 50 years ago the majority of our law was common law, but as governments have become more meddlesome it’s hard to say.

So your ‘most’ may now be right.

I’ll do some googling to try and find out.

 

Nick, it's ok, I did a bit of googling myself and trying to remember back to a course I did many years ago.  result: I don't think the experts know for sure and you are right about the meddling - which I think was the context of my post, really - lots of laws are the result of politicians.

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21 minutes ago, jonno said:

The dairy and meat issue has always been there as an EU member we were only ever allowed to carry what was for personal consumption anyway. That rule still applies to the remaining 27 members.

I find it ridiculous that you can't take meat or dairy but you can take eggs. Also how are my 2 litres of milk, 500g of Lurpak spreadable & 12 rashers of bacon going to get into the the EU's agricultural food chain... which is supposedly the concern, unless they feed their cattle on a diet of recyclable plastic? 
 

As mentioned before, the UK is now a third country in trade terms. The regulations applied to food being brought from the UK to the EU are essentially the same as any other third country - and by law we can't be given preferential treatment. It's just the very long-established basics of international trade.

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18 minutes ago, hhvferry said:

As mentioned before, the UK is now a third country in trade terms. The regulations applied to food being brought from the UK to the EU are essentially the same as any other third country - and by law we can't be given preferential treatment. It's just the very long-established basics of international trade.

Load of rubbish they offered us a food deal with many, many strings attached which we declined, you can't do that if it's governed internationally.

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I just followed a UK-registered car into town which still had 'GB within a Euro flag' plates. Should I have made a citizen's arrest and rugby-tackled the elderly lady to the ground if she tried to get away or was I right to let her go on her way?

Ed

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21 minutes ago, Cabin-boy said:

I just followed a UK-registered car into town which still had 'GB within a Euro flag' plates. Should I have made a citizen's arrest and rugby-tackled the elderly lady to the ground if she tried to get away or was I right to let her go on her way?

Ed

She's a Resistance Fighter, that's how we identify each other. Darn...keep it under your hat

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3 hours ago, Cabin-boy said:

I just followed a UK-registered car into town which still had 'GB within a Euro flag' plates. Should I have made a citizen's arrest and rugby-tackled the elderly lady to the ground if she tried to get away or was I right to let her go on her way?

Ed

She's just posted on Facebook under the title Angry from Angers that a strange Frenchman built like a rugby player has just followed her into town.

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Seems like the full Monty restrictions don't come in till next year.

Then we will be back to getting properly turned over every trip.

Maybe I need to get a multi coloured land rover and the ZZ top coiffure again..

Rhys

 

 

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