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JamesF

"A captain always goes down with his ship"

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"A captain always goes down with his ship"

 

Its an old saying, and many years ago it was true. However, I was wondering if there is an element of this saying which still exists today.

 

For example if you are the captain of the Aurora and hit an iceberg, roughly who would be given priority to get on the lifeboats (bearing in mind that time is very limited)? Where would the officers and his crew go/do? Would they have to stay onboard until last, and if time runs out, they go down. In todays society is the Captain usually the last person to step off onto a life raft (if possible)?

 

In Titanic (the film) we see the Captain shut himself away on the bridge and go down. In those days wasn't he allowed to get into a life-raft?

 

James

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Re: "A captain always goes down with his ship"

 

I didn't know there were that many icebergs round the Isle of Wight........8-)

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Re: "A captain always goes down with his ship"

 

"A captain always goes down with his ship"

 

Its an old saying, and many years ago it was true. However, I was wondering if there is an element of this saying which still exists today.

 

For example if you are the captain of the Aurora and hit an iceberg, roughly who would be given priority to get on the lifeboats (bearing in mind that time is very limited)? Where would the officers and his crew go/do? Would they have to stay onboard until last, and if time runs out, they go down. In todays society is the Captain usually the last person to step off onto a life raft (if possible)?

 

In Titanic (the film) we see the Captain shut himself away on the bridge and go down. In those days wasn't he allowed to get into a life-raft?

 

James

The captain is the commander of the vessel, therefore he needs to be onboard to see the operation of the vessel through to the last minute. The most senior crew would stay onboard to get the passengers and serving crew off the ship. Further, special members of the crew are trained weekly to deal with these emergencies and some would pilot the life-boats, while others would stay onboard (normally the officers) overseeing the operation. Given enough time, they would then board the last life vessel to leave the ship.

 

I don't think it was the case that the captain wasn't allowed off the vessel in Titanic, but that the captain felt that he had a pride and duty to see his ship through everything, and that as he was responsible for her he should go down with her. Whether this is what really happened is another matter!

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Re: "A captain always goes down with his ship"

 

"A captain always goes down with his ship"

 

Its an old saying, and many years ago it was true. However, I was wondering if there is an element of this saying which still exists today.

 

For example if you are the captain of the Aurora and hit an iceberg, roughly who would be given priority to get on the lifeboats (bearing in mind that time is very limited)? Where would the officers and his crew go/do? Would they have to stay onboard until last, and if time runs out, they go down. In todays society is the Captain usually the last person to step off onto a life raft (if possible)?

 

In Titanic (the film) we see the Captain shut himself away on the bridge and go down. In those days wasn't he allowed to get into a life-raft?

 

James

 

 

Of course not.

If you see all the recent events (Ece, Kariba & Tricolor,etc...) everytimes the Captain was on the lifeboat!

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Re: "A captain always goes down with his ship"

 

Of course not.

If you see all the recent events (Ece, Kariba & Tricolor,etc...) everytimes the Captain was on the lifeboat!

I don't think there has been a sinking recently that has resulted in the loss of the captain unless many other lives are lost.

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Re: "A captain always goes down with his ship"

 

I don't think there has been a sinking recently that has resulted in the loss of the captain unless many other lives are lost.

 

You are right.

I don't have understood ALL what JamesF wanna said.:-#

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Re: "A captain always goes down with his ship"

 

If you are the captain of the Aurora then you are more likely to be concerned about fending off some dreadful stomach virus than hitting an iceberg. On the bridge you may well be the last to go down - with the bug!

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Re: "A captain always goes down with his ship"

 

If you are the captain of the Aurora then you are more likely to be concerned about fending off some dreadful stomach virus than hitting an iceberg. On the bridge you may well be the last to go down - with the bug!

 

LOL! (L)

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Re: "A captain always goes down with his ship"

 

It seems from the documentary on the sinking of the Estonia the other night that the Captain and officers off the bridge were the first onto lifeboats - without informing the passengers that the ship was going down at the time...

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Re: "A captain always goes down with his ship"

 

It seems from the documentary on the sinking of the Estonia the other night that the Captain and officers off the bridge were the first onto lifeboats - without informing the passengers that the ship was going down at the time...

 

My recollection from that programme is that the Captain went down with the Estonia.

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Re: "A captain always goes down with his ship"

 

My recollection from that programme is that the Captain went down with the Estonia.

I remember that being the case too. However, the remaining crew were given a code signal to get onto lifeboats and abandon ship early on.

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